Fun things to do in Bogotá

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Bogotá

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    Zona Rosa

    by xaver Written Mar 25, 2014

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    Zona Rosa in Colombian cities seems to be the area where all the entertainments are concentrated such as malls, restaurants, discos, bar exc. In Bogota it's a nice area but also overpriced if compared to the rest of the city.The good side is that is absolutely safe so you can walk without worrying at any time of the day or night. In Bogota te Zona Rosa is also known as T area.

    Zona rosa
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    Zipaquira Salt Cathedral

    by Skibbe Updated Jan 18, 2014

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    This is about an hour on the Transmilenio bus from Bogota. It is not really a cathedral but started as a sanctuary for salt miners. It is quite an experience going deep down into this massive complex. It is a pilgrimage site and contains Stations of the Cross, a dome, and three naves. But I also liked the little town of Zipaquira. It is high in the mountains and really pretty. I found a nice cafe on the main plaza and enjoyed a cappuccino and a piece of cake.

    Pictures from inside the Salt Cathedral are in my travelogue.

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    Torre Colpatria

    by ines2003 Written Mar 19, 2013

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    Torre Colpatria It is the tallest building in the country and the second in South America. It was constructed from 1978 until 1979, and has a total height of 196 metres (643 ft). The main headquarters of Colpatria Bank are located in the building, and also a great number of other banks and financial corporations have offices in it. The building lies at the intersection of 26th street and 7th avenue, in the heart of the city's downtown.

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    ALWAYS CARRY APPROPRIATE TRAVEL INSURANCE..

    by DennyP Written Apr 20, 2012

    COLOMBIA
    ..When I travelled through South America I carried the appropriate travel Insurance for my needs. When researching my travel plans I made sure that I put a good travel Insurance plan in place..This included of course the usual for loss of luggage and travel extras..ie camera and lenses etc. important also is medical cover for ALL accident and hospitalisation and doctors etc..Sometimes in many places the expert help that you may need is not available..Hospital and medical costs can be horrendous.
    The most important item in your insurance plan to put in place .. I beleive is "repatriation" if the unexpected or worst is to happen and you need expert medical attention ..The costs of repatriation back to home can be unbeleivably expensive for the uninsured.
    Of course nobody expects to have accidents or problems while on holiday or travelling ..but we ALL know anything can happen anywhere anytime...even mother nature these days has a big hand in that.
    I don't jump off bridges or out of aeroplanes so , I try and keep my insurance risks as low as possible as the more extreme your activities are the more it will cost.....This of course is relayed in the costs of your insurance policy...Think about that!!
    LIKE THEY SAY........DONT LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT..

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    Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira

    by JessieLang Updated Mar 29, 2012

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    The Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira is a great day trip. The tunnels in this old salt mine have been transformed into a fascinating and beautiful experience. This is the second salt cathedral here.
    The first one opened in 1951, but closed in 1991 because it became unstable. The new one, designed by a Colombian architect, opened in 1995 and is expected to last for 300 years. It is supported by 4 giant columns, which also represent 4 apostles. It is 590 ft. underground, and 250,000 tons of salt had to be removed to build it.

    There are 3 main sections. The first, nearest the entrance, has the 14 Stations of the Cross. Each of these small chapels required the removal of 50 tons of salt. Large crosses look like they are floating in front of the chapel walls, but they are actually carved into them and backlit. At the 14th Station, the wall on one side of the chapel is concave; the other side is convex—as though they had broken apart.

    At the far end, 3 naves represent Jesus’ birth & baptism, life & death, and resurrection. Each one has an altar and beautiful sculptures. Some of the sculptures were moved from the original cathedral. A carved dome in the church copies the one in the Bogota cathedral. Another area has a ceiling carving copied from a Michelangelo painting.

    The site is also an active Catholic church. There are services every Sunday, and occasional weddings are held there. Not everyone can afford to attend because of the admission charge.

    The city of Zipaquira was founded in the 1600s, but mining of salt in this area started in pre-Colombian times (maybe as early as 400 AD) and it still continues. An inland sea covered this area 70 million years ago, and it left a huge deposit of salt underground when it dried up. It is the largest rock salt deposit in the world. As the natives worked in the salt mine, they put up crosses to ask for a safe day, etc. That evolved into the Salt Cathedral.

    The gift shop has items made from the salt (Nativity scenes, etc.) in various price ranges

    You have to be accompanied by a guide. You can drive here and go with an on-site guide, but they take large groups and you might have to wait a little while for enough people to come.

    The best way to see it is to book a tour from Bogota.

    Entrance
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    World of the Fat

    by Assenczo Updated Mar 5, 2011

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    The Botero museum contains one of the priceless collections managed by the Bank of the Republic. Mr. Botero is still amongst the living but for some reason has decided to donate significant portion of his works to the state and here we go – a wonderful individuality is all open to the widest public for free. Once browsing up and down the relatively small museum, one is overwhelmed by the approach that this painter has taken to the world and many questions start to pour with not many answers to back them up. Whatever the rational or gut feeling behind this distorted constitution of the human and not only human body it might be, it certainly keeps you intrigued and puzzled throughout the visit. For people with tendency to worship generous forms this display of abundant flesh and underlined curves might turn into a drug. As it turns out for the uninitiated, Botero is famous the world over and in my case I had to learn that the peculiar statue that I ogled at in Yerevan was his.

    A rear like no other Comfort on a grand scale
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    Eclisiastical niche

    by Assenczo Written Jan 23, 2011

    The ecclesiastical niche in Bogota is significant. It has examples of early colonial architecture and its austere outlook, followed by the opulence and scale of cathedral building and flowing through to the newer and more uncertain in their roots architectural styles of the 20th century. All of them spare no expense to make you feel you are in God’s home and presence while his lieutenants watch over you carefully and sternly. The side effect – artistry has continued to flourish through the centuries.

    Steep vistas Church on top f a church Byzantine? May be Cathedral Square turns into an entertainment venue Nativity scenes are the rage - Christmas2010
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  • Low Cost Way to Visit Zipaquira

    by maxschnell Updated Nov 8, 2010

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    It is relatively easy to visit the Salt Cathedral by public transportation. Ask at your hotel for exact directions but in general one takes the very efficient Trans-Millenio bus system to Portal Norte. The cost in Nov 2010 was 1600 COP (less than $1 USD). From there take another collectivo bus to Zipaquira. Learn to pronounce it and also have it written on a piece of paper to show anyone. Colombians are friendly and are eager to help. Cost was 3000 COP (less than $2 USD). Once in the town get a taxi and be dropped off at the entrance to the Salt Cathedral (minimum fare 4000 COP (little over $2 USD). Discount for seniors for entrance to Cathedral. Unless you are crazy, at the most buy the #4 package which includes everything to see except for the rock climbing experience outside of the entrance to the mine (this is for those crazies). I missed seeing the "mirror" experience even though it was paid for because no one pointed it out for me. There 3 experiences in the mine and the museum outside.
    On the return, I strongly recommend taking a bus to Chia (town before Bogota). Be sure to ask someone on board because it is easy to miss. Get off and take taxi to Andres Carnes de Res Restaurant. It is truly a "don't miss experience." Think of RainForest Restaurant, Hard Rock Cafe, Coney Island, and Carnivale all rolled into one raucous place.

    Climbing Wall Outside of Mine Andres Carnes de Res Restaurant in Chia
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    balconies

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 28, 2010

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    As with many charming colonial towns in Colombia, Bogota is no stranger to balconies. Enclosed or open, these often intricately carved of wood structures add a true flair to an already colorful collection of colonial buildings and are great fodder for photographic outings. Walking around early in the morning, you not only have a great chance to stumble across some great ones but also will enjoy the city at its most peaceful. Though we saw many we liked, we especially loved these green ones set off well against their orange background but if you walk around Bogota on your own one morning you're bound to find favorites of your own.

    colorful balconies abound charming Bogota
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    La Iglesia de San Francisco

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 28, 2010

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    The oldest of Bogota's many churches is La Iglesia de San Francisco which took nearly 65 years to complete between 1557 and 1621. Close to the Museo del Oro it demands at least a cursory visit to see its incredible 17th century gilded altarpiece, by far not only Bogota's largest but most intricate. Unless you are planning on attending mass you might not spend much more time as they are literally in session there on an hourly basis from opening till closing.

    Similar in exterior style with a gorgeous stone facade, La Iglesia la Tercera is just up the street from it and is worth taking a peek for its elaborately carved in wood altars and ceiling in an otherwise plain white setting. It is a much more peaceful place of contemplation than its neighbor as well.

    La Iglesia de San Francisco the interior of La Iglesia la Tercera is stunning
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    Museo de Art del Banco de la Republica

    by richiecdisc Written Jul 28, 2010

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    Museo de Art del Banco de la Republica. Now, that's a mouthful and a surprising one too. Connected to the the Botero Museum by a labyrinth of courtyards, it is also easily accessible by an entrance near the Juan Valdez location likely to draw your attention if heading to see the Botero collection. This little gem should not be missed as it is also free and houses a nice collection in its Arte Coleccion section. Colombian artist Luis Caballero is prominently as well as some lovely large landscapes depicting some of the country's gorgeous nature.

    We revisited this on our second pass through Bogota and there was an amazing exhibition of B&W photography which we thoroughly enjoyed and was also free.

    stunning B&Ws made our second visit memorable
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  • "Cultural tours and bike tours"

    by businessman333 Written Apr 19, 2010

    Is the best service in the ciy The company in Bogota was simply amazing!! Whit this company do a tour in Bogota is very nice and the only way to really see and feel the city! Our tour was guided by Fernando, was very informative and knew about all the sites we stopped at both historically and culturally. He was also very friendly with the current state of Bogota and situation politc in colombia. I advice you this company is the best option in Bogota

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    visit montserrate

    by hanspeter_W. Updated Aug 23, 2009

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    On november 28th, Monserrate's Hill will say "hello" to the colombian christmas eve, with its traditional concert on charge of the Bogota's Filarmonic Orchestra.
    That day, with the Fallen Lord Sanctuary as scenary, the activities of the most waited part of the year will start, in which the Hill gets dressed of lights and the classic colombian christmas figures, welcomes national and foreigner people and enjoys the spectacle of music and fireworks to celebrate the birth of the son of God

    view to monserrate view to bogota from monserrate

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    Oblea-taste it!

    by elsadran Updated Aug 12, 2009

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    Having seen so many locals eating it I was curious to taste it, too. Oblea is a flat, thin, white wafer filled with 'arequipe' which is milk with sugar, soft white cheese and raspberry jam. It is light, very refreshing and not too sweet. I liked it! You can buy it from the street vendors who make it in front of you and choose what the filling will be. I don't remember the price but it was very cheap for the ...pleasure it gives!
    For the recipe get here: Oblea recipe

    a ...tired 'oblea' maker
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    Metropolitan Park Simon Bolivar

    by jumpingnorman Written Jul 8, 2009

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    My driver/guide was thinking of where to bring me next in Bogota and I said I did like going to Parks and so he brought me to this huge park in the middle of the urban area –the Simón Bolivar Metropolitan Park .
    In 1986, Pope Paul IV's visited this area of Bogota and a mass was celebrated – these grounds later became this park loved by Bogotenos. And I enjoyed the green expanse and the wonderful trees, ponds/lakes and little fountains.
    The park is actually formed by five minor parks: The Simon Bolivar, El Salitre, Parque de los Novios, Unidad Deportiva El Salitre and Jardín Botánico José Celestino Mutis.
    It was drizzling a little when I visited and so here were not too many people, but the huge park does have an amusement park, aqua-park, Children's Museum and even a coliseum.
    Other important events held here included shows of Metallica, Roger Waters, Iron Maiden and each year, they celebrate Rock al parque. Bogotenos do love music!

    Metropolitan Park Simon Bolivar, Bogota, Colombia Metropolitan Park Simon Bolivar, Bogota, Colombia Metropolitan Park Simon Bolivar, Bogota, Colombia Metropolitan Park Simon Bolivar, Bogota, Colombia Metropolitan Park Simon Bolivar, Bogota, Colombia
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