Getting Around Bogotá

  • La Candelaria, Bogotá
    La Candelaria, Bogotá
    by mircaskirca
  • Bogota from MontSerate
    Bogota from MontSerate
    by Angelo_B
  • A car of this company picking me up at the airport
    A car of this company picking me up at...
    by Angelo_B

Most Viewed Transportation in Bogotá

  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Car

    by acemj Updated Dec 30, 2007

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    If you're lucky enough to have a local friend in Bogota like I did, you might get to experience driving or at least riding around in a car that you're not paying for! Amy was kind enough to pick us up in her new car and take us up to Montserrate and around town as well. Parking in La Candelaria is possible on the street or, preferably, in a more secure lot such as the one pictured here. It's not very expensive and the lots are enclosed and their is an attendant, so your car and possessions inside will be safer.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    To Bogotá from San Agustin, part 2

    by MalenaN Updated Sep 17, 2007

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    The tip from above continues...
    After lunch we stopped at a few more garages and finally came to one that could repair the bus properly. After waiting for half an hour we saw the driver and the other man working on the bus crossing the road to sit down at one of the bars. I and the other two tourists (one from Colombia) did the same and had a beer.

    When we came closer to Bogotá traffic was moving very slowly as many people were returning to the city after the weekend.

    We arrived to the bus terminal in Bogotá late, about 14 hours after we had left San Agustin. I bought something to eat to bring to the hostel and then went to take one of the “safe” taxis to Platypus. To take a safe taxi from the terminal you will stand in line, say your destination to someone in a window and then you will get a recite with destination and price, and also a telephone number you can call if you have any complaints and the number of the car. This late it was 8800 pesos to Platypus from the terminal.

    While the bus is being repaired
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    To Bogotá from San Agustin, part 1

    by MalenaN Written Sep 17, 2007

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    We were three persons leaving Casa de Nelly and San Agustin for Bogotá the same morning. The guide Pacho helped us with the tickets and brought them to us the evening before. The price between San Agustin and Bogotá, with Coomotor, was 44 000 pesos (August 2007). The direct bus for Bogotá is leaving very early (5.30am) so we left Casa de Nelly by foot at 5am (it was too early to get a car). It was still dark and I was happy not to walk this dark road alone.

    While it had been cold in the bus from Bogotá it became very hot in this bus as the air condition didn’t seem to work. We were stopped once at a military checkpoint were all men had to be searched. Between that and lunch we got problems with the bus, a flat tyre I think. We had to stay in the closed bus while it was fixed, or at least I thought it was being fixed, but we continued with reduced speed and went to a few garages where no one seemed to be able to give us the help we needed.

    Finally we stopped for lunch (and bathroom as the toilet in the bus didn’t work). We stopped at the same road café as on the way down and once again everyone seemed to eat different kind of breads. I was very hungry and asked for chicken, but it had to be quick as the bus were not stopping for too long. I got chicken, rice, potatoes, pasta and salad for 3500 pesos. I’m glad I had proper food as we still had many hours left until we reached Bogotá.

    This tip turned out to be too long so it is continuing below...

    Repairing the bus
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    From Bogota to San Agustin

    by MalenaN Written Sep 15, 2007

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    I went up very early to go to the bus terminal. I didn’t have a reservation and thought a bus was leaving at 6.40 for San Agustin. From Platypus to the terminal this early in the morning a taxi was 8800 pesos (August 2007).

    At the terminal I found out that the first bus to San Agustin was leaving at 7.00. I bought a ticket from Coomotor for 42 000 pesos (the first price was 46 000, but as I said it was expensive the women immediately gave me the other price). At the terminal there are several cafeterias and I had breakfast at Donkin Donuts (sandwich and coffee for 6200 pesos). If there is no bus direct to San Agustin you can also take a bus to Pitalito and change there.

    The bus was rather small but comfortable, and there was a toilet. I had asked for a window seat as I wanted to see the scenery along the way. The disadvantage with sitting there was that the cold air condition was blowing out right above and a sweater was needed (at least on my right side).

    The bus ride took 11 hours. About halfway we stopped to eat. After I came from the bathroom it seemed that everyone ate different breads (only the drivers had tamales). I thought there was no time to order anything else so I bought a yoghurt and some bread with cheese which I didn’t like. I was still very hungry and when we stopped at the terminal in Garzón (I think) I hurried to a cafeteria to buy lunch (meat, rice, salad and Pepsi for 6500 pesos).

    The landscape is very beautiful at some parts and you can at several places see Magdalena River.

    The bus arrived to San Agustin just as it started to get dark. As I didn’t know the way to Casa Nelly and didn’t want to try finding the way in the dark I took a car there for 5000 pesos. I asked for a taxi at the Tourist Office, which is situated just where the bus stops.

    Avenida Jim��nez
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    From Bogota to Zipaquira and back

    by MalenaN Written Aug 26, 2007

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    It is very easy to make a daytrip to Zipaquira from Bogota using public transport. I took the TransMilenio (red buses) nr B74 from Avenida Jiménez bus stop to the end stop Portal del Norte. It was 1400 pesos and took 25 minutes.
    From Portal del Norte there are frequent buses to Zipaquira. They were leaving from the other side of the platform I arrived to. The bus to Zipaquira was 2800 pesos (August 2007) and it took 55 minutes. When the bus stopped near a road crossing and many people went off I asked if it was Zipaquira and it was, and it was also the place for me to go off at as I wanted to visit the salt cathedral.

    Going back to Bogota I walked down to the main road and stopped a bus with the sign Bogota. When it passed Portal del Norte it stopped by the side of the road and from there I and the others had to walk over the road on a bridge to the station. At Portal del Norte I looked for a sign saying B74 but couldn’t find it. I asked for the TransMilenio for Museo del Oro (the stop I wanted to go to) and I was told to take number J 72.

    By Parque de los Periodistas
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    To Bogota from Villa de Leyva

    by MalenaN Written Aug 23, 2007

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    There are two direct buses from Villa de Leyva to Bogota every day. One is leaving very early in the morning and one in the afternoon. As I didn’t want to be in a hurry in the morning it suited me better to travel via Tunja. When I arrived at the terminal in Villa de Leyva the bus was leaving for Tunja within a few minutes. The buses are frequent and takes about an hour to Tunja and cost 4500 pesos (July 2007).

    As I entered the terminal in Tunja and asked for a bus to Bogotá a man took me to a bus that was soon leaving. He said the ticket was 10 000 pesos, but when I was going to pay on the bus it was 13 000 pesos (other people around me paid the same price). The bus was a big air-conditioned bus (not very cold) with comfortable seats. To the bus terminal in Bogota it took over 3 hours (there were some road constructions along the way). Many people went of at Portal del Norte and that’s what I would do another time, to take the TransMilenio bus to the city centre.

    On the same bus as me was a Canadian woman and she was also going to Platypus so we decided to share a taxi. At the terminal you can take a safe taxi. By the exit you can buy a ticket for the taxi. You say your name and where you are going and you will get a ticket with the price, the number of the taxi and a telephone number to call if you have complains. To Platypus (in Candelaria) the taxi was 7400 pesos.

    Street in Bogota
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  • morgr's Profile Photo

    Bus Terminal

    by morgr Updated Apr 19, 2007

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    Bogota's bus terminal is quite a large one and is split into three parts. 'Norte' services bus routes to the north of the country, 'Oriente & Occidente' go to the east and west and 'Sur' go to the south. So depending on where you are going, will depend on which terminal you need to go to. Though all the terminals are side by side, so a mistake wouldn't mean needing to walk far. The terminal is serviced by dozens of different bus companies, all of whom opperate a window in the applicable terminal. IE if one company services buses going both to the north and to the south, that company will have on window in the 'Norte' terminal and one in the 'Sur' terminal. Buses depart frequently to all parts of the country.

    Bogota's bus terminal is quite a distance from downtown Bogota, however it's a strait forward afair getting to and from. From downtown hop on a colectivo labelled 'Terminal', from the terminal hop on one labelled 'Germania'. The fair is 1,000pesos, or thereabouts. A taxi should be no more than 8,000-10,000pesos, I'm guessing (as I've never actually taken a taxi there, only used colectivos).

    Also at the terminal, there are cafe's, food stalls and such.

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  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Taxi in Bogota 2

    by travelife Written Jun 2, 2005

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    The following day I had to get another taxi to my friend that was based on meter and I ended up paying 8 USD for 15 min. ride.

    Now, I had to get the same meter taxi to airport and had to pay 10 USD, hm Should I have waved one instead of getting a meter taxi. But Early in the morning I was not prepared for any unwanted adventure. And always thought its secure if you get one through your hotel.

    always look for this when you are in a taxi

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  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Airport tax

    by travelife Written Jun 2, 2005

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    It angers me a little every time I paid departure tax at the airport which are mostly payable in cash in different countries of South America. And you find out that the tax was not included in the price.

    The airline stuff asked me to get a tax rebate that perhaps depend on what document you hold and where you are going to.

    I got a receipt here in the airport and then went on to get boarding card. And paid the reduced fee before entering deaprture lounge.

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  • Ossi.P's Profile Photo

    Adresses in Bogotá are rather...

    by Ossi.P Updated Nov 16, 2002

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    Adresses in Bogotá are rather easy to find.
    The streets are all in quadratic order with 'Calles' (sometimes the calles are called avenidas) and 'Carreras'...just like streets and avenues in the USA. E.g. if you have the adresse 'Calle 77 #11-91' that means that you live in calle 77, 91 meters away from Carrera 11 in the direction of the next higher carrera (12 in this example). And though 91 is an odd number that means the house is on the left side. Even numbers indicate that the building is on the right side...if you're walking from carrera 11 to carrera 12...

    The Abreviations are Cll. for Calle and Kra. or Cr. for Carrera.

    Carrera might also be called "Transversal".
    Calles might also be called "Diagonal".

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  • Almost all travelers arrive...

    by idrincon Written Aug 26, 2002

    Almost all travelers arrive using commercial planes. Roads leading to Bogota are in very good shape but from Colombian borders to Bogota is almost a 15 hour ride.
    You will not (I'm sure) drive in Bogota. Unless you have experience in driving in places like Mexico City, Sao Paulo or Bankgog, you will find driving in Bogota a very annoying experience. However, taxis have a very good 24 hour service and it's very cheap for foreigners (a typical ride will cost between 2 and 5 dollars). For safety reasons, it's better to use hotel taxis or call-in taxis.
    If you want to venture in public transportation use Transmilenio, the Bogota answer to metro systems. It runs along two major streets (N-S and E-W) that will serve almost every major point in the city.
    Do not use any other kind of public transportation (even locals get lost sometimes because routes are not clearly defined)

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  • ca13's Profile Photo

    Well, if you live in Venezuela...

    by ca13 Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Well, if you live in Venezuela or Ecuador you can get Bogotá by car, is a long trip, but you can know other sites of Colombia.
    But if you live in another country you must book a fly to Bogotá.
    In Bogota you can use a car, but if you haven't one
    you can use bus, the buses aren't very lovely but they go to all sides and you haven't parking problems. And now we have a transport system called Transmilenio, it is a big group of big buses, those buses travel from south to north and form north to south, but new routes are coming up.

    To go outside Bogotá use a car or use a intermunicipality bus.

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  • travelife's Profile Photo

    Highway toll

    by travelife Written Jun 2, 2005

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    Hmm, I found the toll system on highway is quite frequent in many countries of South America. Here we are paying toll on the way (and also back) to/ from Zipaquira.

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Bogotá Transportation

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