Isla San Cristóbal Things to Do

  • Cerro Las Tijeretas/Frigatebird Hill
    Cerro Las Tijeretas/Frigatebird Hill
    by MalenaN
  • Cerro Las Tijeretas/Frigatebird Hill
    Cerro Las Tijeretas/Frigatebird Hill
    by MalenaN
  • Things to Do
    by MalenaN

Most Recent Things to Do in Isla San Cristóbal

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Darwin Finches

    by MalenaN Updated Dec 20, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are 13 species of Darwin Finches in Galapagos Islands, and they are all endemic. The Finches are famous because the role they played in Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution . When Charles Darwin visited Galapagos Islands in 1835 during his voyage with the Beagle he didn’t pay much attention to the finches, but more to the Mockingbirds which he noticed differences in, between the islands. He collected finches but didn’t record from which islands. It was not until he came home and talked to an ornithologist and others who had collected finches during the visit that he understood the significance of them.

    All 13 Darwin Finches in Galapagos Islands have evolved from a species of finch found on the South American Pacific coast. When they came to Galapagos Islands they adopted to different habitats and food available there. The beaks have evolved to be suitable to the food they eat. To be able to specialize in feeding is good when food is scarce and there is more competition for what is available.

    Interesting to know is that the Woodpecker Finch can use thorns or twigs as tools when they search for larva or other insects in small crevices. Ground Finches eat skin parasites from Tortoises, Land Iguanas and Marine Iguanas, and the Sharp-beaked Ground Finch on Wolf and Darwin is also called Vampire Finch as they feed on blood they peck from Nazca Boobies.

    The Darwin Finches have a length of 10 - 16cm. Their plumage is mottled grey, brown, black or olive coloured. Some species are not difficult to distinguish, while others are more difficult to identify. Not only are some species looking alike, but there are variations within a species and there are also hybrids.

    The Darwin Finch in photo 1-3 was looking for food on the path up to El Junco Lagoon, Isla San Cristóbal. The Darwin Finches in phot 4 and 5 was sitting on the rock at Puerto Chino.

    Darwin Finch eating Darwin Finch, El Junco Darwin Finch, Isla San Cristobal Darwin Finch, Isla San Cristobal Darwin Finch, Isla San Cristobal
    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Ghost Crab

    by MalenaN Written Mar 7, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the beach at Cerro Brujo there were lots of patterns of small sand balls. Those sand balls are made by the Ghost Crabs (Ocypode gaudichaudii) that make them when feeding on micro organisms in the sand. When a ball becomes to heavy they make a new one.

    The Ghost Crabs are smaller than the Sally Lightfoot Crabs and they have a paler red-orange colour. They are also more shy and quickly run to their burrows and disappear down the hole when they are approached.

    The Ghost Crabs build deep burrows in the sand, where they can keep cool during the warm days.

    Ghost Crab, Cerro Brujo, Galapagos Islands Sand balls made by a Ghost Crab
    Related to:
    • Cruise
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Galapagos Sea Lion

    by MalenaN Written Jan 29, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Galapagos Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus wollebaeki) is an endemic subspecies. It is common, and there is a population of about 50 000 Sea Lions in the Galapagos Islands. They can be seen in many places near the shores, on beaches, on the rocks or even in the towns (for example on a porch in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno and at the Fish Market in Puerto Ayora). Don’t be surprised if you get surrounded by playful sea lions while snorkelling. It is absolutely fantastic!

    The male Sea Lion becomes very large, up to 230cm in length, with a weigh up to 250kg. They have a dark brown fur, which almost looks black when wet and they have a thick neck.

    The females are smaller and weigh up to 120kg. They have lighter brown fur, which looks dark brown when wet. There are many more females as only one tenth of the Sea Lion pups are males.

    The Galapagos Sea Lions feed during the day and they mostly eat Sardines. They can be away at sea for days to hunt for fish. Sharks are natural predators of the Sea Lions.

    The Galapagos Sea Lions form colonies which consist of a dominant male (bull) and up to 30 females (cows) with their pups. The bull protects its territory against other males and sometimes there are fights. As it is difficult for a male to be away feeding while protecting his territory he becomes weaker and he will then be replaced by a stronger male after a while. Males without a territory form bachelor colonies.

    The females give birth to one pup each year, which they nurse for up to three years. Sometimes you can see two pups of different age suckling milk from their mother. When they are around five months the pups can start fishing for themselves though. The mother and child can recognise each other’s bark and thus find each other among the other Sea Lions in the colony.

    In the first and second photo there is a baby Sea Lion suckling milk from its mother on the beach at Cerro Brujo. In the 3rd and 4th photo there is a Sea Lion lying on a bench at the pier in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, and in the 5th photo there are two Sea Lions resting on a porch, also in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno.

    Galapagos Sea Lions Galapagos Sea Lions at Cerro Brujo Galapagos Sea Lion in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno Galapagos Sea Lion in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno Galapagos Sea Lions in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Isla San Cristóbal

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

34 travelers online now

Comments

Isla San Cristóbal Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Isla San Cristóbal things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Isla San Cristóbal sightseeing.

View all Isla San Cristóbal hotels