Cotundo Travel Guide

  • The Quichua huts we stayed in at Huasquila lodge
    The Quichua huts we stayed in at...
    by Kindra
  • Getting my face painted by guide Pablo
    Getting my face painted by guide Pablo
    by Kindra
  • The Jatun Yacu at our point of entry
    The Jatun Yacu at our point of entry
    by Kindra

Cotundo Things to Do

  • Kindra's Profile Photo

    by Kindra Written Apr 7, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I have been rafting in Canada before on Class IV rapids and had a great time. These rapids were a lot gentler but I also had a lot of fun. Since they are more class III type rapids that come in sections followed by pools of water, you can play lots of games, swim in the water, take breaks to go into the jungle, AND fight the rapids.

    We went through Huasquila and they arranged everything, including driving us to Tena to the rafting company. Our guide Pablo was great, safe, lots of fun. We were then driven to the site of the rapids, taught safety and paddling tips and then started our journey! We had a nice buffet lunch at a little lagoon and later stopped off at a little part of the jungle with waterfall where Pablo took the natural coloured clay from the caves there and painted our faces! It was a terrific day!

    Posing on the raft! The Jatun Yacu at our point of entry The suspension bridge where we got in the raft Getting my face painted by guide Pablo Rafting!

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  • Kindra's Profile Photo

    by Kindra Written Apr 7, 2009

    These caves were historically a sacred site of rituals for the Quichua people who lived in the area before the Spanish conquest in the 1500s. Later on, a Spanish priest claimed to have discovered the caves, though always known to the local indigenous people. However, the caves are formed of lava and volcanic rock (from the nearby Sumaco Volcano which erupted not long ago) as well as ancient stalactites and stalagmites.

    The caves are full of water, ponds and waterfalls. Not for the claustrophobic. You go in with a headlamp and helmet, bathing suit and rubber boots. Nothing else! Prepared to get wet, though I really enjoyed the part when we came to this rushing waterfall in the dark caves and got to dip down into this deep, refreshing cenote below the waterfall (a deep hole carved out of the rocks that is narrow and full of water). We also got to a point where we turned off all our lights and listened to the guide's stories in the complete darkness!

    This phallic structure's called el Pene de Jumandy The crazy volcanic rock and stalactite Booting up by the pool before entering caves The pool at Jumandy- I dare you to go in! Entering the caves

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  • Kindra's Profile Photo

    by Kindra Written Apr 7, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These caves were historically a sacred site of rituals for the Quichua people who lived in the area before the Spanish conquest in the 1500s. Later on, a Spanish priest claimed to have discovered the caves, though always known to the local indigenous people. However, the caves are formed of lava and volcanic rock (from the nearby Sumaco Volcano which erupted not long ago) as well as ancient stalactites and stalagmites.

    The caves are full of water, ponds and waterfalls. Not for the claustrophobic. You go in with a headlamp and helmet, bathing suit and rubber boots. Nothing else! Prepared to get wet, though I really enjoyed the part when we came to this rushing waterfall in the dark caves and got to dip down into this deep, refreshing cenote below the waterfall (a deep hole carved out of the rocks that is narrow and full of water). We also got to a point where we turned off all our lights and listened to the guide's stories in the complete darkness!

    This phallic structure's called el Pene de Jumandy The crazy volcanic rock and stalactite Booting up by the pool before entering caves The pool at Jumandy- I dare you to go in! Entering the caves

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