Cuyabeno What to Pack

  • Rubber Boots
    Rubber Boots
    by filipdebont

Most Recent What to Pack in Cuyabeno

  • dtimoske's Profile Photo

    How much money to bring

    by dtimoske Written Dec 30, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Miscellaneous: Although tours are all-inclusive, you'll want to have about $50-$60 on hand. Many tours pass through indigenous communities, and they charge $1 to watch them in action. I personally don't like this. I feel it's intrusive. While it was interesting watching them make pan de yuca, I felt awkward at the same time. The visit to the shaman will also cost 1 or 2 dollars and 5 to 10 dollars for ayahuasca. This kind of eco tourism helps supports the communities where the oil companies have failed them.

    In addition you'll want to bring money to tip the guides. In our tour we had a guide, a cook, and a driver. I tipped the guide $20 and the cook and driver $10 each. I would have tipped a little more because I thought they all did such a great job, but I didn't have any more money. One couple tipped the guide $100 and the cook and driver $20 each. This may be a little high, but if you think your guide did a great job, tips are completely at your discretion.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • dtimoske's Profile Photo

    Pack light

    by dtimoske Written Dec 30, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: Don't bring your finest luggage. A hiker's backpack is your best bet. Also bring a lot of zip lock bags. I brought 8 and wished I had more. Things you want to keep dry: your passport, your camera, some clothes for the last day, your medicine.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Bring long socks, light clothing, lightweight hiking pants, 5 or 6 shirts with at least two long sleeve shirts, a swim suit, an extra pillow, an old towel. Bring a large zip lock bag to put some of your clothes. Despite all the precautions the the guides take, your things ARE going to get wet. It sure was nice having a dry set of clothes for the 10 hour bus ride back home.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Bring toilet paper, vitamin B pills, Advil (especially if coming from Quito), anti-malaria pills. Bring a couple small bottles of water just in case of emergency.

    Photo Equipment: Bring lots and lots of batteries. There are not outlets to recharge your equipment. Bring zip lock bags for your electronics. Bring your zoom lens if possible. The largest, most exotic birds are high up in the trees and hard to photograph without a zoom. I brought my video camera and was glad I did.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Rubber boots and ponchos are absolutely essential. Your tour should provide these things. Bring Duck tape (keep it dry) to repair any holes in mosquito nets. My pocket knife came in handy on several occassions as well. You'll also want plenty of sun screen and mosquito repellant. When you use the repellant, use it all over your body, not just the exposed areas.

    Miscellaneous: Whatever you do, don't overpack for this trip.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Camping

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  • cybergenic's Profile Photo

    The bare essentials

    by cybergenic Written Nov 24, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: Medium sized waterproof backpack.
    Watertight bag for electrical/camera equipment.
    Small daypack

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Thongs or Sandals.
    Waterproof hiking boots.
    Board Shorts.
    TShirts

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Waterproof bandages.
    Bug Spray
    Sun Cream
    Malaria pills

    Photo Equipment: Lots of batteries because there is no electricity

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: Towel

    Related to:
    • Kayaking
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel

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  • filipdebont's Profile Photo

    Rubber Boots

    by filipdebont Written Oct 4, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rubber Boots

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: The camp provided us with good rubber boots.
    But for the guys with big feet, there were no big sizes. The biggest size they had was 45. But that was known before we started the trip, so these guys brought there own boots from home.
    And as the service in the camp was so good, they left these boots to use for future travellers.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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Cuyabeno What to Pack

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