Quito Warnings and Dangers

  • Warnings and Dangers
    by MalenaN
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by MalenaN
  • Warnings and Dangers
    by MalenaN

Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Quito

  • jonniej's Profile Photo

    Backpacker information Lunch at SAE, Sept.3rd

    by jonniej Updated Sep 1, 2009

    The South American Explorers Club is hosting a backpacker's information lunch on September 3rd from 11am to 3pm.. A member of the British Embassy and the staff and volunteers of SAE will be on hand with advise and information about travel, health, and safety in Quito and Ecuador. Citizens of the UK will also be able to sign up for the LOCATE program which helps the embassy assist those in need quickly. A small charge will help cover food costs.

    Quito Clubhouse
    311 Jorge Washington y Leonidas Plaza

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Study Abroad

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  • Klaudia&Frank's Profile Photo

    WARNING – Robbery scam in busses leaving Quito!

    by Klaudia&Frank Written Sep 13, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a warning for all travellers leaving Quito by bus, especially to those travelling south to Latacunga. We have been robbed in a bus leaving from Quito Terminal Terrestre and have heard now from hostal-owners in Latacunga and other locals that this scam is very common.

    There is a gang of three or four young people observing tourists buying tickets in the terminal and then entering the bus before them. One of the group is posing as the bus assistant / controller, advising seats and indicating the passengers where to put the bags (under the seat or in the overhead compartment). The rest of the group seat themselves around the tourists and one of them behind. This person uses the bumpy and bad roads to move the bag back and opens / cuts it to steal everything of value. Sometimes they even close the bags and put back cases or wallets after stealing so that the tourists don’t notice the theft.

    This scam is known to the police and the bus companies, is going on since months but no one seems to do anything about it.

    Our advice: Keep your bags on your lap at all times. Never place them beneath your feet. Never let someone (not even the bus assistant) touch your bags or let them help you.
    We have lost a laptop computer and two expensive sunglasses. Tell this to other travellers, spread the word so that this stops.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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  • elsadran's Profile Photo

    What not to do in Quito!

    by elsadran Updated May 18, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beautiful Quito!

    Don't walk up to Panecillo or Pinchincha. Everybody will warn you against that, especially the taxi drivers who of course want to make a profit. But it is true. There have been a lot of unhappy incidents. During my 2 week stay I heard of 7 tourists who were kidnapped.
    Don't wear gold necklaces except if you have decided to part with it. Everybody I met who used to have a gold chain was robbed of it in plain daylight. They are very swift and well trained...
    Don't leave anything of value in your hotel room. It will disappear into thin air even with the door double locked. They are ..magicians...
    Don't trust your money with anyone and don't show your big bunch to anyone. It's better to use an ATM card to get small amounts at a time. Always keep your money in a hidden pouch close to your body. Keep a small pack of dollars out to pay bills and never admit you have more.
    Don't keep your camera on your shoulder or around your neck except if you have been tired of it and need a new one... They stopped me in the street several times and instructed me to put it in my bag. A European living there told me she had already lost 3 of them.
    Many times local people warned me in a confidentially whispering voice that an innocent looking passer by, even a woman, could be a potential skillful thief.
    However none of this has happened to me, except that .. the airlines lost my whole suitcase....So watch yours in public transport.
    What to do if you have a serious problem: Go to the Ministry of Tourism and make an official complaint! It's much better than trying to solve things out yourself. The address is Av. Roy Alfaro N32-300. Tel. 2 228303.
    Good luck! Nevertheless Quito is a nice place.

    Related to:
    • Singles
    • Family Travel
    • Backpacking

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Basilica steps

    by acemj Updated May 10, 2008

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    Jonathan scaling the stairs

    When you visit the Basilica del Voto Nacional in the Old Town, it's incredibly fun and rewarding to climb the towers and to see the spectacular views from here, but be careful with the steps and lack of railings and the makeshift ladders and planks that provide the access to these areas. They are safe enough if you exercise caution, but while I was there, I couldn't help thinking that there's no way that these facilities would be up to code in the US! ;-)

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  • Hiking the summit of Pichincha

    by cgregoo Written Apr 28, 2008

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    In the past three months, there has been a dramatic increase in assaults on people hiking from the Teleferico to the summit of Pichincha volcano. Women, men, people traveling alone, and people traveling in groups as large as eight, have been assaulted. The assaults are violent and are not limited to robbery. Currently, there is no security in place for people hiking from the Teleferico. It is not recommended to hike the summit at this time as there is complete lack of security.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Altitude

    by b1bob Updated Nov 21, 2007

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    2483 m. at Mitad del Mundo
    1 more image

    The altitude in Quito is quite high, averaging 2800 m. (9200 feet). When I found out it was that high, I wrote into "Fox News Sunday House Call" and Dr. Isadore Rosenfeld read my submitted question on the air. Dr. Rosenfeld recommends a day to take it easy (certainly not bed rest) to acclimate yourself to the altitude. That means don't go higher into the mountains or do anything strenuous. The altitude didn't have any adverse effects on me until, well into the trip, I took the Teleferiqo up to 4100 m. (13448 feet). I managed to take all the photos I needed, but I was keen to get back to the base at 3165 m. (9680 feet). If you are older or have heart or respiratory problems, see your doctor before organising a trip to here or any other high altitude city.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Volcanoes and earthquakes

    by b1bob Updated Nov 18, 2007

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    Cotopaxi off in the distance

    Quito is surrounded by eight volcanoes: Cotopaxi (pictured at 5897 m. 19342 feet), Antisana, Sincholagua and Cayambe to the east; Illiniza, Atacazo, Pinchincha and Pululahua to the west. The most interesting of the lot is Cayambe, which is east-northeast of Quito. Although it hasn't erupted since 1786, it is the only mountain or volcano on earth that lies directly on the equator (the southern flank, at least) and has a permanent snow cap and glaciers.

    Quito is the only capital in the world to be directly threatened by an active volcano. Guagua Pinchincha, only 21 km. (13 miles) west, has continuing activity and is under constant watch. The largest eruption occurred in 1660 when over 25 cm (10 inches) of ash covered the city. The latest eruption was recorded on 5-7 October 1999, when a large amount of ash was deposited on the city. Although not devastating, the eruption caused significant disruption of activities, including closing the international airport.

    Activity in other nearby volcanoes also can affect the city. In November 2002, after an eruption in the volcano Reventador, the city was showered with ash for several days with greater accumulation than the previous closer eruption.

    The region also is vulnerable to earthquakes. The worst known earthquake to have hit Quito occurred in 1797 and killed 40,000 people. The most recent major seismic event, with a magnitude of 7 on the Richter scale, occurred in 1987 with an epicentre about 80 km (50 miles) from the city. It killed an estimated 1,000 near the epicentre, but Quito itself suffered only minor damage. About a year before my first visit, the city felt a quake measuring 4.1 on the Richter scale, but no major damage was reported. While I was there, some said a small earthquake happened, but I sure enough didn't feel it.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Dodgy neighbourhoods

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    San Roque on the Panecillo

    Like all cities of any size at all, Quito also has its dodgy neighbourhoods. Most of the tourist areas are in the north. Many of the dodgy areas are on the south side and in the hills just above town. There is really nothing much to see south of the Basilica del Voto Nacional. The one area where tourists may clash with a bad neighbourhood is the San Roque neighbourhood on the Panecillo below the Virgen de Quito. Tourists have been robbed making the trek on foot. Taxis are cheap, so be safe and not sorry.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Know your buses

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    metro bus
    1 more image

    There are many different types of city buses in Quito. I found that out the hard way. I went into the city on a metro bus from the Ofelia station. Because it was one of those long buses, I thought it was a Trolé Bus. When I took the real Trolé Bus back, its northern end point was different from that of the metro bus. I ended up having to take a taxi from the Estación de la Y which is near the 10 de agosto and the Avda. de la Prensa through to the Ofelia station. Thank goodness taxis are cheap.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Bad roads

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    the worst roads I've ever seen

    I have been to many states and countries with bad roads, but some of those around Quito have to be the worst. Potholes big enough to lose a small child in and road construction can appear with little warning, so mind your speed.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Fog

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    fog

    My first experience in Quito was the foggy drive from the airport along the winding roads through the hills through to Cumbayá. I want to make it clear that, while fog is common at night, it doesn't get foggy every night. Fog is even more rare at any time during the day. When fog does happen, keep a better distance than normal.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Don't worry, but use common sense

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    my first meal in Ecuador included salad

    The worrywarts often say for people not used to Quito to wait a few days to eat local fruits, vegetables, and salads. I had salad an hour after landing and suffered no ill effects. The key is to make sure the produce has been thoroughly washed before you eat it. That is, any reputable-looking restaurant or the people in whose home you stay will be more likely to be mindful of that than a street vendor or at a lesser restaurant.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Rotten drivers

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    rotten driving skills on display

    Save your hate mail on this one. It is my observation that many of the folks in Quito don't know how to drive. They take traffic lights as suggestions, they rarely signal, they never look where they're going, and they don't hesitate to cut folks off like the idiot in the picture did to us. (No, this isn't an isolated example. If I had a nickel for every time that happened down here when I was there, I could buy a round-trip ticket: first class.) As bad as the drivers are, the pedestrians are even worse! It's some wonder with the rain, fog, steep hills, bad roads, and a heaping helping of rotten drivers that there aren't more accidents on Quito's roads.

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  • b1bob's Profile Photo

    Steep hills

    by b1bob Written Nov 18, 2007

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    city of hills and valleys

    Quito is a city of hills and valleys. Be careful whether you walk or drive. The streets are very narrow and cars often drive too fast for safety. If you walk, make sure you are in shape to make the climb. The locals are used to the 2800 m. (9200 ft.) altitude, but many outsiders not be able to climb these hills.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    the deadliest view

    by richiecdisc Updated Nov 8, 2007

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    steep? Yes. Worth it? Most decidedly.
    1 more image

    The Lonely Planet heralded the climb to Basilica del Voto Nacional as the most deadly one in all of Quito. Though there were some parts best not attempted by those afraid of heights, most of it was not bad at all and just about everyone can make it to the final ascent ladder. This is the view from above and though it was steep and perhaps a bit exposed with regard to what you can see, it is very safe with plenty to grab a hold of as you try not to look down. Yes, it is well worth it. That extra climb affords quite a view of both the cathedral and the entire city.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

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