Local traditions and culture in Guyana

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Guyana

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    Dollar of Guyana

    by henri123 Updated Apr 8, 2014

    Normal exchange rate in guyana at the bank is about G$200 for one US$

    On the G$20 the famous Kaieteur falls

    On the G$100 georgetown cathedral

    On the G$500 Parliament building in georgetown

    It is quite easy to change cash at Scotia Bank

    guyana dollar
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    Guyana's Local Brews

    by travelmad478 Written Mar 16, 2013

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    If you're looking for alcohol in Guyana, you have two options: Banks beer and El Dorado rum. I found both to be highly worthwhile--the rum because it really is good rum, and the beer because it is cold and Guyana is very hot! Banks is not exactly a craft brew, and it's so low-alcohol that I could put away three of them in short order without feeling much at all, but it's very refreshing after a hot day slogging through the jungle or the streets of Georgetown.

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    Pepper pot and bakes

    by Aafia Written Jun 20, 2007

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    My all time favourite meal in Guyana was pepper pot, an Amer-Indian stew that is the national dish. It was made in Tusenang by Camille, the wife of our guide, Thomas. We waited patiently while the beef was stewing in a sauce of peppers, cinnamon and cassava root. It was served with hot bakes: delicious bread fried in lard.

    Is it ready yet? Bakes: fried bread in lard.
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    Child protecting bird

    by Aafia Written Jun 19, 2007

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    As we were trekking from one village to another in the Pakaraima Mountains of Guyana, we came across a very small settlement of about two families and saw these birds for the very first time. They are called Gray-winged Trumpeters and I was told they can be tamed and kept as "watch dogs" to protect children and babies not just from strangers but from snakes, as they are very adept at killing them. As we passed through, these birds made sure we didn't come too close and made quite a racket if they felt threatened.

    Gray-winged Trumpeters
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    Walking to school

    by Aafia Written Jun 18, 2007

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    In Guyana, education is free from nursery school through university. School is compulsory for children aged five to fourteen. The school teacher is an important member of village life and many parents make sacrifices so their children can attend school. All children have access to a village primary school. As we trekked from village to village we would encounter young students on their way to school, some having to walk as much as an hour.

    On our way to school. Up early and geetting ready for school.
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    Logging

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    The road into the interior of Guyana and further across the border into Brazil, has been built to carry logging traffic. Brazil apparently offered to pay for a proper road to be built, on the understanding that they would get a one mile stretch of land either side of the road! That is an awful lot of land! The Guyanese government did not agree!

    Another great worry to environmentalists is that logging companies from Asia, having devastated their own tropical forests, are now searching for new sources of timber.

    Timber
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    Hunting

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    The local Macushi people still hunt using the traditional bow and arrows. The main prey are the smaller mammals such as agouti or maybe tapir if they are lucky.

    Seeing Bernard walking towards us with his traditional hunting equipment, it seemed somewhat out of place for him to greet up with a firm "Good morning!" Forgetting that English is the official language of Guyana, you don't expect a greeting in your own language!

    Bernard also works on an ad hoc basis as aboatman ferrying tourists around.

    Bernard
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    Slash and burn

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    The local Macushi comminity in Fairview Village, use the slash and burn method to create arible land where they can grow vegetablers, mainly cassawa.

    Within Iwokrama, this is sustainable and controlled, unfortunately that cannot be said for more large scale slash and burn agriculture elsewhere in the country.

    Slash and burn
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    Petroglyphs

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    People who lived in Guayna as far back as 7,000 years ago, left alasting legacy with these petroglyphs near Iwokrama. They are only accessible by boat at low tide (dry season). Very little archaeologial work has been carried out in order to try and find out more about the people who libved in this area in the old days.

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    Pepperpot

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    One of the most famous Guyanese delicasy is the pepperpot. It various from household to household, and can be made with beef, chicken or fish.

    Veronica, our host in Surama village, really wanted to share her traditions with visitors, but ours was the first group to whom she had dared to serve the pepperpot. The dish it is served in had been in her generation for centuries, and she was very fond of it. The recipe is her own, with fish and fiery little chillies (the small yellow "bits" in the bowl that look like sweetcorn - my were they HOT!!!!). The dish is served with thin, crispy cassawa bread, and is absolutely delicious! Veronica was very nervous to see what our reaction would be like, and she was so pleased that we appreciated her traditional cooking, that she has decided to make it a regular feature with tour groups!

    Pepperpot
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    Village food

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    In the villages, it is not just a case of nipping down to the local convenience store for those last minute purchases, not can you buy in bulk and freeze!

    All the vegetables are locally grown. Most families only hunt wild animals as and when they intend to eat them, and then sell the remainder of the meat to the other villagers.

    My lunch consisted of:

    Eddoe - the grey veggie bottom right
    Plantain - the yellow stuff bottom left
    Pumpkin - the orange stuff
    Okra - the green vegetables
    Pumpkin cake on the left.

    The sauce on top of the vegetables was made from coconut.

    Village food
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    "Facilities"

    by grets Written Nov 3, 2004

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    Once you're in the hinterland, the facilties are few and far between. Mostly, you use the bush. You should bury your faeces six inches deep and burn any toilet paper.

    Some places may provide a basic latrine, such as this one on the photograph.

    On the throne
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    This is a photo of our...

    by simbac2001 Written Sep 7, 2002

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    This is a photo of our indigenous Amerindian Children. _____________________________________________________

    This is the Culture of the Guyanese nation......first there came the Amerindians from Mongolia they settled in the forest......later came the Europeans from Spain, Holland, France and England they came looking for gold but stayed to trade and to exploit the rich virgin land of Guyana. Thus the forced arrival of masses of Africans, Portuguese, Chinese and East Indian.

    The Amerindian population has given Guyana its indigenous, religion, the Halle-lujah meaning the Gods of the sky, and the Great Makonaima God of the sun, rain, bush and of all thins natural' the beautiful legends and myths that explain life, love and other imponderables that enhance Guyana's beauty.

    Guyana like any other Caribbean country, has succeeded in blending western music with the strong catchy african rhythm and lyrical melodies of the East. There has been a fusion of modern and traditional sounds from Amerindian flute, the Amerindian Mari-Mari dance, masquerade the African Cumfa and Queh Queh (wedding dance) and Indian Sitar to the organ, piano and latter-day steel pan.
    _____________________________________________________

    In the world of Art and Sculpture, the Amerindian influence still lives. Guyanese folk music and folk tales, whether extolling the virtues, vices or wisdom of people, places and things are disseminated in the rich creole dialect of the people-creoles and the local proverbs, ring-games and celebrations are all being stirred in a melting pot that must produce food that is exquisitely GUYANESE!

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    Guyana dollars are unstable....

    by B_Lacombe Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Guyana dollars are unstable. Many try to buy US dollars for a much higher rate than the bank would give you. One can make a good transaction but like anything else beware since one may easily get robbed.

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    This is where I learned the...

    by Gerry_Crooks Written Aug 24, 2002

    This is where I learned the differences between cultures. Do not compare what is done in Guyana to what you do in your own hometown. Accept them on their turf. And it becomes more enjoyable, learning a new way to do things.

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