Surama Village Transportation

  • "Our" vehicle
    by grets
  • Meeting a vehicle on the red dirt track
    Meeting a vehicle on the red dirt track
    by grets
  • Boats on the river - after bailing out!
    Boats on the river - after bailing out!
    by grets

Most Recent Transportation in Surama Village

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    Getting back to Surama Village after the camp

    by grets Written Oct 25, 2004

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    The travellers would sit on top of all the luggage

    Those who did not want to walk the three miles back to the vilage where given the option to ride on the tractor back. What they weren't told though, was that they'd share the trailer with all our luggage, cooking equipment, hammocks, tarpauling, camping equipment, an outboard motor and four of the staff! An interesting experience travelling three miles over extremely bumpy terrain perched on top of this lot!

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    Boats on the Burro Burro River

    by grets Written Oct 25, 2004

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    Boats on the river - after bailing out!

    We wre quite dismayed to see one the boats was submersed in the river - we were supposed to be exploring the area in that soon! Gary explained that in the extreme heat they suffer in this area, they store their wooden boats below water to stop it drying out, the wood shrinking and it letting in water! That's a relief!

    At low tide during the dry season (when we were there), there are many obstacles to manouvre around in the river, such as rocks and fallen trees. The river rises many feet during the rainy season!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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    The transport to Carahaa

    by grets Written Oct 24, 2004

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    The tractor with its passenger trailer

    From Surama Village it was a three mile walk to Carahaa, where we were to spend the night. Those who were unwilling or unable to walk, could catch a ride with the local tractor. Sitting on the back was quite an experience, having to hold on for dear life as you bumped your way over the rough track.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Road Trip

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    The long and winding road.....

    by grets Updated Oct 24, 2004

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    Meeting a vehicle on the red dirt track

    Once outside of Georgetown, the road was a red bauxite logging track. Each time another vehicle passed, we had to wind the windows up to stop the dust from entering the vehicle. Despite this, we were a lovely shade of red by the time we reached Surama. Fortunately, the road did not have heavy traffic - in fact, during the last seven hours of driving, we met only three logging trucks travelling together!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Turning off the "main" road

    by grets Written Oct 24, 2004

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    Pulling the Land Cruiser out of the puddle

    The track to Surama is only passable during the dry season - I can see why!

    Once we turn off the "main" track and head towards the village of Surama, the last five or six miles, deteriorate even more, if that is possible. By now it is totally dark, and the seriously rutted track has puddles the size of a small lake, surrounded by a sea of mud! And this is the dry season!

    We follow the Land Cruisers, and the other drivers appear to be concerned about how our driver will manage. So are we! And with good cause. At the second puddle, we get stuck in the mud! The driver revves the engine at such speed, making the wheels spin, that we dig ourselves deeper and deeper into the mud!

    One of the Land Cruisers take out a tow rope, and haul us out of the sea of mud without any hassle. Oh, the power of a four wheel drive! He then tries to get past us in the middle of a puddle, and gets stuck in the deep end! It was obviously deeper than he thought, up to the top of the wheels in fact. The passengers at the back get out to try and lighten the load, but those in the middle and front do not wish to swim in the muddy lake and remain where they are.

    We manage to get the truck around the side of the puddle, and the tow rope is now attached to our truck, as we try to haul the Land Cruiser out of its predicament. Our driver has apparently never towed anything in his life. He revves the engine up and jerkily starts and stops at great speed, instead of slowly, surly and smoothly pulling us out. After much shouting and swearing by the other driver, we eventually manage to get them out of the deep puddle. The rest of the journey goes without incidence, but it is nearly 9pm before we arrive at the village!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Deteriorating road

    by grets Written Oct 24, 2004

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    Log bridge

    Once we have crossed the Essequibo River, the road deteriorates. Now it is many potholes joined together by gravel.

    The driver appear to have a small problem with his eye sight: he seems to be heading straight for the potholes!

    Bridges are really just large tree trunks placed on top of a metal frame. Sometimes with cross planks, sometimes just the logs. As we are nearing the bridges I am wondering why he doesn't slow dow. Has it not seen the bridges? Should I say something? Surely he is going to slow down any minute now? At the very last minute, he appears to notice the bridge, slams his breaks on, and then skids - travelling sideways towards a narrow bridge with no supporting edges on almost totally bald tyres! I quickly become a nervous wreck, and regret voluteering to sit in the front seat!

    We travel on and on and on. Paul said we should reach the village about four in the afternoon. It is now gone seven and there is no sign of any village!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Crossing the Essequibo River

    by grets Written Oct 24, 2004

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    The pontoon ready for loading

    At Kurupukari we cross the Essequibo River by pontoon. Once our three vehicles have loaded, the operators try to start the engine. No joy. After many, many attempts, I join two other girls for a pee-excusrion back on land, as this could be a lenghty procedure.

    Eventually, after about 20 minutes, they manage to get the engine going. Just as we have set off from land, another couple of vehicles arrive, and we return to pick them up. By this time the light is fading.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Overland to Surama

    by grets Written Oct 24, 2004

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    We travelled overland from Georgetown to Surama in a covoy of three vehicles - two Lan Cruisers and this luggage truck which also transported four passengers.

    We chose to go in the truck, for no particular reason, it just happened to be the nearest on to us when we boarded.

    Unlike the Land Cruisers, the truck did not have air conditioning, which meant having the windows open in order to keep the temperature to some sort of narmailty. On the plus side, the truck did not have the far back seat with people sitting sideways on very low and uncomfortable seats, as they did in the Land Crusiers.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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Surama Village Transportation

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