Local traditions and culture in South America

  • Local Customs
    by MalenaN
  • Local Customs
    by MalenaN
  • Local Customs
    by MalenaN

Most Viewed Local Customs in South America

  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Christmas in Santiago

    by gwened Written Dec 17, 2012

    Christmas is held there very close to family traditions. The city is richly decorated and main sights are illuminated at night
    and try these season's favorite Queque de Pascua, Cola de Mono buy them at pasteleria Mood at Louis Pasteur 5393

    there are parties celebration in many hotels, the San Francisco is famous for them. Any special event you can write the local govt in Santiago at
    santiago@munistgo.cl

    For new years go to Castillo Hidalgo,its a happening
    hope it helps

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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    ETIQUETTE

    by davidjo Written Jun 26, 2012

    As many South Americans have their roots in Spain some cultural customs are similar to the Spanish. Generally speaking the South Americans are more easy going than their European counterparts. There are a few unwritten rules that you should be aware of.
    It is considered rude to chuck an object to someone, but should be handed to them directly.
    If someone is having a conversation with you and steps closer to you it would be considered rude to step back.
    At meal times don't help yourself to the last portion of chicken or whatever, ask first if anyone would like it. Not asking would be considered rude or greedy.
    Do not mention a person's faults or mistakes in front of a crowd. Pull him to one side and mention the problem in private to avoid losing face.

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    The heros of Islas Malvinas

    by globetrott Updated Aug 31, 2011

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    Have you ever heared of "Islas Malvinas" ? When taking a look at the inscriptions of maps, books or postcards in Argentina you will hardly ever find the expression "Falkland-Islands" but always instead the name "Islas Malvinas"! That is the local name for the Falkland Islands and in Fireland and other areas of Argentina you will find in almost every village and town a monument for the soldiers, who were fighting for them just a few years ago. The monument in my pictures here is the one in Rio Grande, it is actually a series of monuments along the main road N3 and is also the wall of the local army barracks.
    Take a look at any map in Argentina, the Falkland islands will always be written there "Islas Malvinas (Arg.)" - just like they would be part of Argentina and GB would have lost the war...

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    In Fireland iron will rust extremely slow

    by globetrott Updated Aug 31, 2011

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    When driving around in Tierra del Fuego / Fireland you will see a natural phenominon in many places: old Iron might have a tiny little bit of rust, but even after decades it still looks pretty the same. And so you will see there cars and other machineries standing somewhere in the landscape, rusting just a bit but not thrown away. There are several reasons for that, first of all the fact maybe that once such a machinery was taken to the end of the world with a lot of shipping-costs,they might still sell some of its parts as spareparts to someone or use them for other machineries.
    All of these vehicles are displayed in the garden around the Misión Salesiana de Santo Domingo, where I took all of these pics they might also serve to explane some functions to the pupils of the school of agriculture
    The locomovil in my main picture is more than 100 years old and still not falling apart like it would after 100 years standing in the open air in rain and snow in Europe maybe.

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Molas - a great souvenir from the San Blas Islands

    by globetrott Written Aug 31, 2011

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    Reserve some extra money for a special souvenir, when you are lucky to be able to visit the San Blas Islands off the coast of Panama. Molas are these works of their art called, and the native ladies fix such molas to the front and to the back of their costumes, but they sell them also like pictures / paintings to the tourists.
    These are cloths, with different colors, sewed and fixed in a very special way stripe by stripe.
    I bought a lot of them and a few of them are shown in my pictures here.
    Some of them are shown behind glass in my home and some others were tranferred into great & interesting cushions !

    Molas - a great souvenir from the San Blas Islands Molas - a great souvenir from the San Blas Islands Molas - a great souvenir from the San Blas Islands Molas - a great souvenir from the San Blas Islands Molas - a great souvenir from the San Blas Islands
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  • chancay's Profile Photo

    A list of Peruanismos

    by chancay Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Here I have a for "latinos" probably well known list of peruvian slang meanings...

    - El Peruano no se emborracha: ¡se mete una bomba!
    - EL Peruano no saluda: te dice ¡Hola won!
    - El Peruano no tiene amigos: tiene patas
    - El Peruano no se cae: se saca la mierda
    - El Peruano no se burla: se caga de risa
    - El Peruano no está enamorado perdidamente: está templado hasta el culo
    - El Peruano no sale con una chica: tiene un plancito
    - El Peruano no está con una mujer sólo por el sexo: está enchuchado
    - El Peruano no convence: tira floro
    - El Peruano no se lanza: se avienta
    - El Peruano no besuquea: chapa
    - El Peruano no es un tipo que molesta: es una ladilla de culo
    - El Peruano no molesta: jode
    - El Peruano no se baña: se mete un duchazo
    - El Peruano no se molesta: se pone hecho una mierda
    - El Peruano no te golpea: te revienta a patadas
    - El Peruano no tiene amantes: tiene calentaos
    - El Peruano no sufre de diarrea: está con la bicicleta
    - El Peruano no fracasa: la caga
    - El Peruano no es mujeriego: es un pinga loca
    - El Peruano no sale corriendo: sale hecho un pedo
    - El Peruano no toma siestas: se queda jato
    - El Peruano no cree que es mucho dinero: es un huevo de plata
    - El Peruano no es tonto: es un huevón
    - El Peruano no es un tipo detestable: es una rata
    - El Peruano no tiene relaciones sexuales: se echa un polvo
    - El Peruano no ríe hasta más no poder: se caga de la risa
    - El Peruano no la ve difícil: está bien yuca
    - El Peruano no va rápido: va como alma que lleva el diablo
    - El Peruano no toma: se zampa
    - El Peruano no entra en acción: entra con todo
    - El Peruano no te alaba interesadamente: es un sobón, un franelero, un lameculos
    - El Peruano no es listo: es recontra mosca
    - El Peruano no pide que lo lleven: pide una jaladita
    - El Peruano no ha consumido droga: está duro
    - El Peruano no es un tipo alegre: es como la puta madre
    - El Peruano no cree que algo es lo mejor en su especie: es lo máximo; ya no ya
    - El Peruano no hace algo muy bien: hace lo máximo!

    Fiesta en Mama Africa / Cusco
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  • pepples46's Profile Photo

    Wildlife

    by pepples46 Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Mico..as they're called in Brasil...Callitrix penicillata kuhli
    Otto we called him, a black- tuffed-ear Mormoset, kind of Monkey. they have no thumb, five straight fingers, catching stuff looks quite a bit of an effort. but they fast.
    nowadays they are actually on the endagered spezies list. Otto was bought in Salvador da Bahia and lived with us for 2 years in Nova Lima, quite free, he knew where the food came from, quite tame too..but very spirited and territorial, forming monogamous partnerships and raising the young, while mum is doing....other things
    the common Mormoset..Callitrix jaccus...is very common and when you look in the trees of Rio's suburbs, you can see many of them, and so can they.

    common Mormoset

    Otto
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  • cium's Profile Photo

    Hiking the Salkantay

    by cium Written May 22, 2008

    While hiking, do as the locals do and chew (chacta) coca leaves. There is a whole ceremony involved in chewing too, but for your purposes just chew a quinto, meaning five leaves together folded up. It will take care of or prevent altitude sickness and will give you energy (and NO, coca leaves are not a drug and are not cocaine). It's a hard hike but not too hard either. Go slow if you get tired, take your time and if you are already working out you will be fine. It's so amazing that the magic of the place will give you all the energy you will need. Layer up, sierra weather is tricky. One minute very warm/hot the next very cold. Bring extra pairs of socks, a hat, scarf and a great attitude.
    Please don't forget to tip your porter.

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  • pepples46's Profile Photo

    the Voice

    by pepples46 Updated Feb 3, 2005

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    of America Latina, Mercedes Sosa, born in Argentina,her songs voices socio-political questions, and the old native indian songs of South America. I meet her a couple of times a very kind and gifted woman, greatly respected by her peers..the voice of America Latina.
    references can be found on the net

    Mercedes Sosa
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  • pepples46's Profile Photo

    the Culture

    by pepples46 Updated Dec 18, 2004

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    of the Incas spread over more than 2000years, that's pretty awesome to me.the Altiplano and the Aymara's on of the oldest Inka tribe.
    their woven handgraft is pretty colourfull and widespread on the markets, often the only income they had.

    Aymara Women, with tipical Boulderhat
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  • Maillekeul's Profile Photo

    The coffee - Le cafe - El cafe

    by Maillekeul Updated Mar 21, 2004

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    Well, coffee in South America is supposed to be the best ! Well, except from the brasilian one (excellent !) and notwithstanding that I have not been to Colombia, I may tell you that you won't drink a good coffee in the other countries ! Why ? Because the best one is exported and they don't know how to prepare it here ! Really funny though : in a restaurant, you might be served : 1. coffee in a small bag (like tea !), 2. a Nescafe box with boiled water, 3. pure coffee with boiled water !!!

    Bon, le cafe d'Am-Sud est cense etre le meilleur, non ? Eh bien, hormis le bresilien (excellent !) et le colombien (je peux pas dire, j'ai pas goute le pays), je peux vous assurer que vous ne buverez jamais de cafe d'exception en Am-Sud ! Le meilleur est exporte et la preparation n'est pas au top ici ! C'est marrant, d'ailleurs : dans un resto, on peut vous servir : 1. du cafe en sachet (comme le the), 2. une boite de nescafe avec de l'eau, 3. de l'essence de cafe avec de l'eau !!!

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    Children

    by andal13 Written Nov 29, 2003

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    South America is a young continent... An important percentage of the population are the children. Unfortunatelly, not always the children have a child's life; the infantile work is a social flagellum, and a common situation here. Peddlers, musicians, beggars, workmen, can be seen everywhere.

    Sudamérica es un continente joven... Un importante porcentaje de la población está formado por niños. Desgraciadamente, no siempre los niños tienen vida de niños; el trabajo infantil es un flagelo social y una situación común aquí. Vendedores ambulantes, mendigos, obreros, pueden ser vistos por todas partes.

    Children at Cusco

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    Artisan

    by andal13 Updated Nov 29, 2003

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    South American artisans are well known all over the world; all kind of handicrafts are made and sold along the whole continent. Clay, stone, cane, wood, plaster, wool, leather,dry fruits, metal... Any material can be usefull for creative mind and hands.

    Los artesanos sudamericanos son bien conocidos en todo el mundo; todo tipo de artesanías son realizadas y vendidas a lo largo del continente. Arcilla, piedra, caña, madera, yeso, lana, cuero, frutos secos, metal... Cualquier material puede ser útil para una mente y unas manos creativas.

    Artisan

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  • andal13's Profile Photo

    Musicians

    by andal13 Written Nov 29, 2003

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    Anywhere you are, you can hear the music... a quena, a berimbao, a charango, a tamboril, a bandoneón... The street musicians gladden your stroll in exchange of some coins.

    The picture shows some tamborileros (side drum players) at Sarandí street (Montevideo).

    Dondequiera que estés, puedes oir la música... una quena, un berimbao, un charango, un tamboril, un bandoneón... Los músicos callejeros alegran tu paseo a cambio de unas monedas.

    La foto muestra a unos tamborileros en la calle Sarandí (Montevideo).

    Tamborileros

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    Shoeblacks

    by andal13 Written Nov 29, 2003

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    In some places in South America you still can find shoeblacks... With their particular box, they are at the main squares of the cities waiting for their customers.

    The picture shows the showblacks at the main square of La Paz (Bolivia).

    En algunos lugares de Sudamérica aún pueden encontrar lustrabotas... Con su particular cajón, ellos están en las principales plazas de las ciudades, aguardando sus clientes.

    La foto muestra los lustrabotas de la plaza principal de La Paz (Bolivia).

    Shoeblacks

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