Unique Places in South America

  • Iglesia Pedro Claver dome from port at dusk
    Iglesia Pedro Claver dome from port at...
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  • one of Colombia's stunning churches
    one of Colombia's stunning churches
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  • Off The Beaten Path
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in South America

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    Fireland: a great museum of whale-bones

    by globetrott Updated Sep 1, 2011

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    Museo Acatushun de Aves y Mamiferos Marinos Australes is the full name of a small museum in Estancia Haberton / Fireland, where you will see a large collection of whale-bones inside and outside of the building. It is a walk of 10-15 minutes to get there by foot from the ship and you normally will have enough time to go there and take a look at least at the whalebones that are displayed OUTside of the building.
    Museo Acatushun is where you enter the farm-area, when arriving by car, in a distance of maybe 1500 meters from the main farmbuilding / restaurant of Estancia Haberton.
    The entrance to the garden of the farmbuilding is also decorated by a gate made of whale-bones, see it in my last picture !

    Museo Acatushun in Haberton / Fireland Museo Acatushun in Haberton / Fireland Museo Acatushun in Haberton / Fireland Museo Acatushun in Haberton / Fireland Estancia Haberton / Fireland
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    • Historical Travel
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    Fireland: Puerto Haberton

    by globetrott Updated Sep 1, 2011

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    Estancia Haberton & the first white settlers in Fireland
    Estancia Haberton was the first settlement of the europeans in Tierra del Fuego / Fireland.
    It is still a farm today and includes a great museum of whale-bones, a good restaurant and a lot more ! Haberton is also a great daytrip from Ushuaia: take the boat or drive there by car, in both cases you will almost need a whole day to explore everything there.
    A day in Haberton takes you back into the past, as in this place it seems they did not thrown away anything, but kept it for spare-parts or what-ever and so you can still see old washingmachines, a sawmill, various cars, trucks and boats - read more about in my Haberton-page !

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    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Fireland: San Pablo & the wreck of the Desdemona

    by globetrott Updated Aug 31, 2011

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    San Pablo is a really tiny village at the Atlantic Coast of Tierra del Fuego / Fireland. The wreck of Desdemona is more or less the only sight in San Pablo, that is not even a village, but rather a few houses and an old motel, that is not used anymore and most of its windows are broken.
    You will see the ships-wreck of the Desdemona already a long time in the distance, but it takes some time,until you will find the best path to get there. In any case you have to walk the last 200 meters on the beach, through the muddy ground, but it was worth it.
    See the size of that ship, when you click on my last pic and see my brother with his video-camera in comparison with the ship !
    When driving along the dust-road to San Pablo you will see a great and scenic landscape, with several narrow brooks, wild sheep and cows and even some guanakos - and when you are lucky you will not meet them, while they are trying to cross the street and running into your car ! We saw one crossing the road ahead of us and a group of 6 guanakos in the forest next to the street.

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    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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    Fireland: Misión Salesiana de Santo Domingo

    by globetrott Updated Aug 31, 2011

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    Misión Salesiana de Santo Domingo is a small village in the north of Rio Grande and it was there, where the first monks from Europe started to build a mission and teach the locals how to improove agriculture.
    Nowadays the Misión Salesiana de Santo Domingo is at one side a national monument and at the other hand it is still a well-known school for agriculture and while we were walking around the mission we saw quite a lot of pupils of all ages there, a part of them was riding on horses close to the school and we could hear some others in the classrooms. The founder of the salesianer-monchs, Don Bosco from Torino / Italy, can be seen on top of the school-entrance
    Dont miss to take a look inside the small church of the mission, it dates back to the year 1898 and it has an interesting interior. You can enter it freely and without restrictions, you just have to find the right entrance of the long fence that was built around the church.
    Museo Monsenor Fagnano is the name of the interesting museum is one of the side-buildings of the mission. You will find a lot of exhibits about the 4 native tribes, who where living in Fireland, when the monks of Don Bosco had arrived. These tribes were water-nomads, travelling from one place to the other and they were dressed only with thin furs all year long. Just think of the icy winds even in summertime here and you might understand, that they were eating only meat and fish and they even had a different ordinary body-temperature of over 38 degrees celsius ( human beeings normally will have 36,8 degrees and everything above 37 is feever and you have to stay in bed with such a temperature) These tribes died shortly after the arrival of the white men, partly because they got diseases they were not used to, partly because the white men were hunting there as well and did not leave enough food for the tribes.
    You will see 2 locomovils (my 3rd picture) displayed in the garden of Misión Salesiana de Santo Domingo and when you get to Ushuaia,you will find another locomovil inside the innercourt of the prison-museum.

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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Argentina: Montes Martial, a glacier in Ushuaia

    by globetrott Written Aug 27, 2011

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    Montes Martial is a glacier high above the town of Ushuaia, the southernmost town on earth. You can take the bus up there or you drive in your own car, it is a drive of just a few minutes and you will be able to touch snow and take a little walk and of course you will also have an excellent view of the bay of Ushuaia and its surrounding mountains.
    There is a great mountain-restaurant as well, we had an excellent vegetable-soup there.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Skiing and Boarding

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    Argentina: Isla Martillo, a penguin-island

    by globetrott Written Aug 27, 2011

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    Penguins are the main attraction of Isla Martillo, a small island in the Beaglechannel,
    rather close to Puerto Willimas and Haberton.
    In case that you would like to walk around Isla Martillo you have to take one of the
    organized bustours from Ushuaia, BUT ask there as well, how long you will be allowed to stay
    on the island.
    I just saw it from some distance, from the catamaran going to Haberton and there also were
    not a lot of penguins at this place at the beginning of November. November is their breedingtime and
    the chicks will be there from December onwards.
    There are 2 possibilities to take a look at Isla Martillo:
    1) Take a fulldaytrip to Estancia Haberton by ship from Ushuaia and Isla Martillo is a place, that you
    will visit on the way to Haberton. The ships are not leaving daily, but 2-3 times a week and mostly 2
    different shipping-companies will start at 09.30am in Ushuaia. You will pass by the lighttower at the end of the world from quite some distance and you will stop at Isla Martillo ,an island with penguins : the catameran is getting close to the beach there, BUT you have no chance to get out, after 10 minutes the ship is leaving again there for Haberton, where you will get a guided tour and will have some extra time to walk on your own or go to the cafe / restaurant of Estancia Haberton.
    Before you get to Haberton, you are able to order a 3-course-menu for about 30 ARG $ (=7,50 Euros) onboard.
    Calculate some extra 30 minutes to get your ticket and to embark after a time-consuming check-point, when entering the port-area.They will insist of all your handbags, camerabags etc. scanned like at the airport and several ships are leaving all at the same time !
    2)Take a bustour by "Pira-Tour" to Isla Martillo and you will be able to even WALK on the penguin-islands , while all of the ships-tours, that advertise this Penguin-island as well will just get close to the island and you are just able to watch the penguins from the distance.
    Pira-tours is offering the tours from Ushuaia to Isla Martillo in combination with a tour to Estancia Haberton, a large farm that once was the very first farm of the white settlers in Tierra del Fuego / Fireland.

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    • Adventure Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Carmelo and the Nandu...

    by pepples46 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    at the beautiful Rio Tigre in Uruguay, can be reached by boat from Buenos Aires or from Rio Grande do Sul City of Quarai or Urugaiana on a very idylic river cruise.
    Carmelo is know for its Nandu Nurseries and lovely setting at the River, a quite Town to set back and relax.
    the Nandu is the smalles species from the Family of Oistiches and Emus, the fightles birds. the Male looks after the offspring, while Mum goes of for more exiting times.

    Nandu Nursery
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    • Sailing and Boating
    • Arts and Culture

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    beaches in uruguay

    by rkearns Written Jul 4, 2010

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    i have not traveled within uruguay besides by bus from buenos aires to florianopolis in brazil. the buses are very comfortable, equipped with a/c and a bathroom. you should have no problems with your baby girl. 4 hrs. is not too much time and most of the time, in my experience, there are other youngsters on the bus.

    as far as uruguay beaches go, here's an article on two distinctly different beaches within reach from montevideo:

    http://www.myworldsouthamerica.com/uruguay-punta-cabo-polonio.html

    they both have a different feel. see what works. cabo sounds more interesting to me, being more isolated and colonial, but to each his own. they are two hrs. apart by car.

    cabo polinio

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    Volunteer work in the Amazon

    by Nelven Written Jan 1, 2009

    One of the best options I've seen for volunteering in South America is this one: www.peacevillages.org . They are the direct recepients of the help. No finders fees or middlemen. They've been there for many years, are well organized, have various accomodations and plans. You volunteer whatever you know how to do. The longer you stay the better the price for accomodations.

    Cheers!

    Nelson

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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Work Abroad
    • National/State Park

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    From Venezuela to Guyana

    by cochinjew Written Jun 23, 2008

    If you can get to Puerto Ordaz ( the old ciudad Guyana) from Caraccas, then you have the choice of begining your journey in Barrancas or Tucupita or Curiapo. I know that you can hitch a ride on a boat going to Guyana from Barrancas and certainly from Curiapo. No scheduled service, and the ride is rough, through the orinoco delta and then on to open seas to the guyanese coast. from there by bus to Georgetown.
    Alternatively, fly into Puerto Ordaz from Caracas, just a short one hour ride from Caracas and you can connect with international flights into Caracas, aeropostal is one of the airlines plying that route. from there you can take a bus or get a ride to Santa Elena de Uiren, through some delightful scenery of Tepuis, and various Indian tribes. At Santa Elena Uiren, make sure that you have a visa to Brasil and also Yellow Fever certificate, otherwise Brasilian authorities will turn you back, I tried to bluff saying I am a doctor etc, but didnt work, had to go back to Santa Elena (not that far away from the Border, a short taxi ride away) and get an yellow fever shot ( i had forgotten my yellow fever certificate)and i was let in, even though strictly speaking you should have an Yellow fever vaccination certificate at least ten days old. from the border you can go to the delightful riverside brasilian city of Boa Vista, the smallest state capital in those parts. At the bus station you can take a bus that would take you to the Guyanese border. after clearing the brasilian customs, you can board a boat to the other side of the river which is Guyana, and a nice little town of Leatham. from leatham you can fly or take a bus to georgetown. almost every one needs visa to Suriname. I got mine at the Suriname Consulate in Miami.
    Good Luck, Delta Orinoco was truly an adventure.

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    Working While Traveling

    by abckidz Written Jun 19, 2008

    I'm currently living in Argentina teaching English - that industry is taken pretty seriously here. While you MAY be able to pick up a few hours here and there, you should know that the students are learning English to improve their opportunities for the rest of the their lives, e.g. getting a better job with a higher salary, sending their kids to school etc., not paying for beer.

    That being said, most of the English teaching positions here require a certificate. I can't speak for other Latin American countries as far as teaching English is concerned.

    I do know that working on various types of farms doing work around the house or on the actual farm is pretty popular all over the world, but as far as I know they only would be providing free accommodation and possibly some food. In my opinion it's the same as being paid because that's a free bed to sleep in and some free food that you're not spending money on. For this you may want to try some Google searches related to working on farms in South America in exchange for food and a place to sleep. Good luck and enjoy!

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    • Work Abroad
    • Study Abroad
    • Budget Travel

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    The Lost City Colombia I trekked up and flew down!

    by Katzky Updated Sep 11, 2006

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    I took a trip initiated in Santa Marta, Colombia for a 6 day trek to the Lost City ( la cuidad perdida) remnants of a city dating 500 B.C. of the Tryrona Indians discovered only in 1976. I have to say it was harder than I expected! It’s three days up, and three days down. The first day I fought so hard to make it through the day! The next day, I found when it was really hard on me, I would stop, breath deep, and ask those beautiful mountains and jungles for her energy, and it worked! I kept a better pace and felt great. But alas, after I reached the city, I was pooped! Then a torrential rain came and I prayed to get off that mountain in one piece. I had a feeling I'd slip, fall and break something... Now if I was an animal, I would be a Hawk. The morning of day 4, I saw a beautiful helicopter land on the largest terrace, (built as the foundation of the largest home in the lost city). The guide knew I was going to have a rough time of it going down, so he secured me a spot on that copter (a Huey, probably purchased from good ol’ U.S. of A.) Thank you Great Spirit! I waved good bye to 22 other trekkers! (I did miss them and made great friends from all over the world!!) But it would have been very hard for me to make it down...
    Now, here is my TIP--
    I purchased my trip through Over Alestur Tours in the Rodadero, and I was the only trekker to pay 600,000 pesos. But every one who went direct to Turcol, the planners, payed only 440,000 pesos. Also, the whole country is required to take a yellow fever vaccine because of a recent epidemic. But we as tourist (though I’m Colombian who’s lived in the U.S. all my life) are not required. I didn't. But had I known, I would have taken it. It’s 10 days after the shot is administered for effectiveness.
    Have fun in Santa Marta, the oldest European city in South America, and home to the highest coastal mountain range in the world.

    A Kogi child Colombia's Indigenous Rio Magdalena Katrina Elias A rest in a creek
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    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Brasilia

    by pepples46 Updated Dec 16, 2005

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    carved out of the State of Goias high Plateau 1100m above sealevel, right in the selva(savanne), build in about 3years, though many Buildings, like the Cathedral took over ten years to be finished.
    Brasilia ended up as Brasil's artificial Capital in 1960. the then President Juscelino Kubitschek had polished his big Ego. though the Architecture of Oskar Niemeyer, the Urbanist Lucio Costa and Burle Marx as Landscaper delivered an exceptional outcome and the most modern City in the world, Brasilia suffered from the word go.
    neclected by the People of Brasil, more humiliating..by the very People who it was build for, the Goverment and its Civil Servants.
    Rio de Janeiro was now second in Line, just laught, knowing the Civil Servants would be back. well they where in ...every free min.spending their time again at the Copacabana.
    But I got to say...when in Brasil and having a day to spare, fly out from Rio or Sao Paulo and have a look.around Brasilia the 760km from Rio are worth it.
    good webside on the history of Brasilia....have a look

    Brasil's Supreme Court in Brasilia
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    Parana

    by pepples46 Updated Dec 16, 2005

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    the 3rd southerly State of Brasil ...Parana, with it's lush, green and fertil pasture. an ideal off the beaten path, but then....when you wanna travel overland to the Foz the Iguacu, it becomes a destination in it's own right. Parana feeds Brasil with grain and the best coffee.
    Parana's Capital Curitiba a 'small City' by Brasil's standards, population around 1.5mill, neat and very efficent, at an altitute of over 900m, therefore always a little on the rainy side, but good accommodation and fine restaurants, will make up for it

    Fazenda in Parana
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    • Work Abroad
    • Farm Stay
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Local fauna 7

    by andal13 Written Jan 4, 2004

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    The Southern Elephant Seal (Mirounga leonina) is the biggest seal of the world; the adult males have a lenght of 6m and weigh 3 or 4 tons, and develop a proboscis when are 6 or 8 years old; the adult females are smaller (3 m, 1 ton) and do not have the proboscis.
    I visited the only continental station for southern elephant seals at Punta Delgada (Peninsula Valdés, Argentina).

    El elefante marino (Mirounga leonina) es la foca m?s grande del mundo; los machos adultos tienen una longitud de 6 m y pesan 3 ? 4 toneladas, y desarrollan una proboscis cuando tienen de 6 a 8 a?os de edad; las hembras son m?s peque?as (3 m, 1 tonelada) y no tienen proboscis.
    Visité el único apostadero continental de elefantes marinos en Punta Delgada (Península Valdés, Argentina).

    Elephant seals

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South America Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of South America off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for South America sightseeing.
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