Palacio De Gobierno, Lima

4 out of 5 stars 20 Reviews

Plaza Mayor - Main Place (Centrum of Lima)

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  • Changing of the Guard at the Palacio De Gobierno
    Changing of the Guard at the Palacio De...
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Front View of the Palacio De Gobierno
    Front View of the Palacio De Gobierno
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Palacio de Gobierno
    Palacio de Gobierno
    by littlesam1
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    GOVERNMENT PALACE

    by davidjo Written Apr 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You will find this building in the main square, Plaza Mayor. The building was renovated in 1937 and has many rooms, courtyards and a garden. Originally the site was a Indian Burial place and the original palace was constructed in 1535, but has been reconstructed/altered/renovated several times. The changing of the guards can be seen at noon each day, but tours of the palace can only be arranged through the information office.

    PLAZA MAYOR
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    Presidencial Palace

    by staindesign Updated Dec 7, 2011

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    This is a must see! The president of Peru lives here, the palace is an entire block. There isn't much to see, as far as, you can't enter the palace. But it is interesting to watch the changing of the guards. Also there are army guys surrounding the palace with machine guns.

    Front of the palace side door of the palace
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  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Impressive Changing of the Guard at the Palacio

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Nov 14, 2011

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    The Palacio De Gobierno is the home of the Peruvian president. It is a relatively new building built in 1937 in the style of French Baroque architecture. Formerly the site was the home of Francisco Pizzaro. Everyday around noon there is an elaborate changing of the guard at the palace. Folks line up for over an hour to see the impressive event. Entrance into the palace is free even though there are armed guards posted to the sides of the palace. We did not get an opportunity to visit the inside of the palace because of the changing of the guard ceremony going on at about the same time.

    Front View of the Palacio De Gobierno Changing of the Guard at the Palacio De Gobierno

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    Lima's Drinking Water

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated Oct 18, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From what I had read the City of Lima's water treatment program is a work in progress and unreliable. I would recommend purchasing bottled water from the local grocery store. From talking to folks the San Luis brand appears to be one of the best. Oh yes the water you will find comes with either "sin gas," or "con gas." The latter being club soda so unless you are looking for mixing drinking go with "sin," or without gas.

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  • littlesam1's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Gobierno

    by littlesam1 Updated Dec 10, 2010

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    The Palacio de Gobierno is the Presidential palace of Peru. It is located in Plaza Mayor. If you are looking for Plaza Mayor don't be surprised to find that most people in Lima still call it by its former name Plaza de Armas. Even the staff at our hotel referred to the Plaza by its former name. The palace was the original old home of Pizarro. It was built around 1538. The structure had major damage over the years and was eventually restored in the 1920's and 1930's after major fires. When you approach the palace you will see that it is surrounded by a large black fence and that armed guards are stationed in all directions.

    Palacio de Gobierno Palacio de Gobierno Tanks and armed guards at Palacio de Gobierno

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    House of Pizarro

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 19, 2009

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    This building was built by Francisco Pizarro when he was Governor c 1535. Then, it was used by the Viceroys of the Viceroyalty of Peru. There were several fires - the last one was in the 1920's, so some of it isn't very old. The President doesn't actually live here anymore. People used to be able to visit, but that may not be possible now.

    Every day at noon, the guard at the palace changes and this is fun to watch according to some of our friends on the ship who saw it on Friday.

    Because of APEC, the Presidential Palace was being used for meeting of various heads of states and therefore the square and Cathedral were closed for a good part of the time we were there. But on Monday, when we did our Highlights tour, the square was open again.

    After we came out of the cathedral we saw a band forming up in the forecourt and a limo, and were told that the Chinese ambassador was getting ready to leave. We waited to see if he would come out, but he never showed nor did we get to see the changing of the guard.

    Band in front of the Presidential Palace Square, police and palace when we arrived Closeup of the band Limo and tanks in front Closeup of limo
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    In Presidential Palace, about a question

    by interventor Written Jul 23, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hi! Yesterday, i went to Historic Centre of Lima, and i asked about a question, and i was surprised of the answer. There is no more tour inside Presidential Palace.
    There were tours before, but with this new goberment (since 2 years ago) they were cancelled. It is a pity.

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  • Trumpet, Tanks, and French Horns - Oh My!

    by intiqori Written Dec 17, 2007

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    I had the opportunity to view a spectacular changing of the guard ceremony in front of Lima’s Presidential Palace. The ceremony, almost an hour long, was heralded by the Presidential band, blowing through trumpets and French horns in bright red suits as they paraded around the courtyard. This was followed by a hundred or so militia men who executed elaborate patterned marches in synchronicity around the courtyard. After 30 minutes, the band and the militia marched out of the palace gates and started a slow procession around the main square. Dozens of men riding horses joined in the march, and a sizable crowd of locals and tourists gathered around the square to witness the spectacle. The event was quite memorable even with the sight of two armed and manned military tanks sitting at each corner of the palace facing the crowd in the square.

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  • ThiagoRamos's Profile Photo

    Government Palace

    by ThiagoRamos Written Feb 2, 2007

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    The magnificent building of the Government Palace dates from the XVI Century and was known as "House of Pizarro" because the spanish conqueror worked and lived here since the foundation of Lima until his death in 1941.

    The change of guard takes place daily at 11:45 AM. I´ve missed it when I visited Lima... shame on me!!!

    Government Palace - Lima Government Palace - Lima
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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Palacio de Gobierno

    by acemj Updated Sep 16, 2006

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    This is the official residence of the president of Peru and the building was only completed in 1938. It was on this site in 1541 that Francisco Pizarro was murdered. Tours can be arranged a day in advance by booking at the entrance. Unfortunately, we didn't have that information, so we didn't visit the interior.

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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    See the Changing of the Guard at the Palace

    by AKtravelers Written Mar 2, 2005

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    Every day at noon, the guard at the palace changes, a ceremony based on the event at Buckingham Palace. But it a way, the ceremony in Peru is much more colorful. First, the bolivarist uniforms, with the plumed hats and bright colors, make a great spectacle. Secondly, the Peruvian guards employ a variety of steps/kicks to get themselves in position, including the highest-kicking goose steps I have ever seen. Furthermore, it will strike most anglophonic observers as odd that a martial band would play Simon and Garfunkel during such a serious ceremony! In fact, they are playing the song "El Condor Pasa", written by a Peruvian in the 1940's but borrowed by the American duo in the 1960's (it's amazing what you learn when you travel).

    The guard changes in Lima
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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    An interesting Tour of the Presidential Palace

    by AKtravelers Written Mar 1, 2005

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    Once we got in (see Warnings and Dangers), we found the tour of the Peru's Presidential Palace to be interesting. Unfortunately (from my perspective, not that of the tour guide), the Palace was rebuilt after a 1920's fire by a variety of architects borrowing a variety of styles. How about some originality? For example, the room in the photo is modeled after the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles. Interestingly, it is used for the most important state functions and belatedly got air conditioning when they realized a small room full of hot-aired politicians gets, well, hot. It is the only room we toured that has air conditioning.
    If you're lucky enough to get a tour of the Palace (it takes some doing and planning ahead) make sure you look at Pisarro's coat of arms on the back of the chairs in the state dining room. They show an Incan with chains around his neck.
    By the way, President Toledo does not currently live here.

    Andrea and Sarah take the podium for Pres. Toledo
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  • RORRO72's Profile Photo

    CAMBIO DE GUARDIA ENTRADA PRINCIPAL PALACIO PIZARR

    by RORRO72 Updated Mar 24, 2003

    El Palacio de Gobierno se conoce como Casa de Pizarro en razón que el fundador de Lima lo habitó hasta el día de su muerte en 1541. El edificio de gran valor histórico y arquitectónico ha sufrido los estragos de los indicios en 1884 y 1921, debiendo en consecuencia, realizarse algunas modificaciones. Destaca su estilo afrancesado y entre sus salones los denominados Colonial, Dorado y Pizarro. En una de sus alas, se ubica la residencia oficial del Presidente del Perú. Gran atractivo turístico constituye la ceremonia de Cambio de Guardia que se efectúa diariamente al mediodía.

    Cambio de Guardia Palacio Pizarro

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  • RORRO72's Profile Photo

    ENTRADA PRINCIPAL DEL PALACIO PIZARRO

    by RORRO72 Updated Mar 24, 2003

    Fue edificado en el lugar de residencia del curaca Taulichusco; el edificio actual fue inaugurado en 1938. Destacan en su interior el Salón Dorado, Salón Túpac Amaru, el Gran Comedor y el Patio de Honor.

    Entrada Principal del Palacio de Gobierno

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  • El_Sueco's Profile Photo

    El Palacio de Gobierno

    by El_Sueco Written Jan 3, 2003

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    The place for the palace was choosen by Francisco Pizarro. It is unknown in what year Pizarro started to build his residens. During the first years after the conquering it was a turbulent period and Pizarro had to for some time leave his newborn city. However, when he returned in September, 1535, it is known to have been ready.
    After the death of Pizarro and the following centuries, the exterior of the palace was not well mantained. Outside there was big commerce on the streets, "vendedores ambulantes". In 1884 the government of the republic decided to give the palace a more dignified and prestigious view, and the commerce outside was prohibited. A new facad was constructed.
    The palace have injured from three fires, the biggest one in 1921. The palace of today shows the result of a big restoration of the Pizarro palace, and it was inaugerated in 1938.
    The palace is about 20.000 m2. The polish architect Ricardo de Jaxa Malachowski was responsible for the restoration work. He has also projected other important buildings in Lima.
    The changing of the guards is daily at 12.00.

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