San Francisco Church And Convent, Lima

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 47 Reviews

Calle Ancash, At The Corner With Lampa

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  • San Francisco Church And Convent
    by TooTallFinn24
  • San Francisco Church And Convent
    by TooTallFinn24
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  • AKtravelers's Profile Photo

    The Church of San Francisco beat Lima Cathedral

    by AKtravelers Written Mar 3, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entering the Church of San Francisco

    The Church of San Francisco is one of the few buildings that predates Lima's 18th century earthquake, which alone makes it worth a visit. But its interior beauty also far surpasses that of Lima's cathedral. If you want to get an idea of what religious life was like during Spanish colonial times, this is the place to come. It's in a quaint square just down a few narrow streets from the Plaza de Armas.

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    San Francisco

    by SirRichard Written Sep 24, 2005

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    The main facade

    San Francisco is probably the most famous church here after the Cathedral. Inside the convent you will find a magnificient library, catacombs and some peaceful patios.
    There are guided tours (most in spanish, but also in english) showing you the many chapels, paintings, stairs, patios...

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Iglesia San Francisco Catacombs

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jan 25, 2009

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    catacombs

    Deep under Iglesia San Francisco is its weirdest site. In the catacombs are the remains of 1000's. The monks here have arranged these remains by bone types. The strangest is this arrangement in an old well.

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    Iglesia de San Francisco- Monastery or Convent?

    by grandmaR Written Jan 23, 2009

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    Earthquake damage?
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    Our guide kept calling this a convent, but I think that is a missed translation on her part because when I think of a convent, I think of nuns. Apparently this church is most famous for the catacombs, and secondarily for the library and collection of religious art. It is probably best known for a mural of the last supper depicting the apostles dining on guinea pig and a devil standing next to Judas.

    We saw none of that, because we stayed to see if the Chinese Ambassador would come out of the government building while we were watching so we had to cut short our visit here. The catacombs are somewhat claustraphobic, and the site is definitely not handicapped accessible. Some people didn't even go in and waited outside in the courtyard.

    The San Francisco Monastery and Church was consecrated in 1673 and is one of the best preserved colonial churches in Lima. It withstood the earthquakes of 1687 and 1746 but did suffer extensive damage in a quake in 1970.

    The architecture has been described as baroque or Spanish Neoclassicism.

    It is open every day from 9:45 to 5:30
    Adult 5.00 S/I
    Students 2.50 S/I
    Child 1.00 S/I

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  • TooTallFinn24's Profile Photo

    Beautiful Church in Old Town Lima

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Nov 14, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Nestled almost adjacent to the Cathedral of Lima is the impressive Iglesia y Convento de San Francisco. The church was built in 1674 and is considered to be an outstanding example of colonial baroque architecture. At the door is a very nice wooden portal. Inside the church there is a very nice altar and well preserved wooden stairs. There is a tour of the church that takes about an hour but we didn't go. In the basement of the church is a former burial ground with a catacomb and hundreds of skulls.

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  • El_Sueco's Profile Photo

    San Francisco de Asis (1)

    by El_Sueco Updated Aug 21, 2004

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    San Francisco de Asis

    One of the most important religious centres.
    Founded by Francisco Pizzaro en 1535.
    1656 the tempel of San Francisco was destroyed, but a new tempel was reconstructed during the XVII century.
    It has the best exterior of any of the religious buildings of Lima from colonial times.
    In the area are also a monastery, a museum and the catacombes.

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  • El_Sueco's Profile Photo

    San Francisco de Asis (5)

    by El_Sueco Updated May 13, 2003

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    The catacombs

    The catacombs served as a cementary until 1808, it is estimated that more than 80.000 bodies were put to rest there.
    The bone reservoirs are 10 m deep, and is build to resist seismic waves.
    Also note the crypt with the name Venerables where the rests of Fray (brother) Juan Gómez are placed (died 1631). Fray Juan Gómez was immortilized by the famous peruvian author Ricardo Palma in the tradicional legend "El Alacrán [Scorpion] de Fray Gómez.

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    Iglesia de San Francisco

    by acemj Updated Sep 16, 2006

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    A visit to this church and monastery is only 5 Soles and is well worth it. The church dates to 1674 and was my first introduction to "Lima Baroque" architecture, which I still don't really understand. However, I did enjoy seeing the carved portal and seeing the artwork throughout the monasteries many rooms, courtyards and stairways. I must admit that I was concerned about the preservation of much of the artwork and carvings, which are mostly just exposed to the elements and don't seem to be very well-maintained. Tours can be arranged in English, but we just followed along with the nearest guide who happened to be speaking Spanish. One of the best parts of the tour is going down underneath the structure into the catacombs where the bones of over 75,000 people are stacked in some interesting patterns (skulls, hipbones, femurs, etc. are all neatly stacked together in an eerie type of organization).

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  • El_Sueco's Profile Photo

    San Francisco de Asis (6)

    by El_Sueco Written May 13, 2003

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    A distant view of books

    The librery contains more or less 25000 volumes, written in different languages and on different topics. A catalogization of the books is going on for the moment. The librery is only accessable for research and people with special interest. We others just have to pass by.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Church of San Francisco

    by richiecdisc Updated Mar 9, 2003

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    Church of San Francisco

    This baroque church with distinct Moorish influences survived earlier earthquakes but in 1970, it did not fare so well. Its restoration was so detailed and complete that it remains one of Lima's best examples of colonial architecture.

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    San Francisco de Asis

    by Urzu Written Jun 24, 2008

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    This church and monastery date of the 17th century, and you can see a lot of the Spanish influence there. I was specially impressed to see a "mudejar" dome in the monastery. Of course much of the work has had to be renovated due to the many earthquakes that the city of Lima has suffered. When you're walking around the omnastery you can even see how croocked the walls are! Also interesting to see are the library, and the catacombs of the church. The catacombs were the local cemetery for many years, so under the church thousands of bodies are thought to be burried.

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  • al2401's Profile Photo

    Convento de San Francisco

    by al2401 Updated Dec 9, 2011

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    Convento de San Francisco
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    The church and monastery of Saint Francis were consecrated in 1673 and completed in 1774. The church, built in the Spanish Baroque style, survived earthquakes in 1687 and1746 but was extensively damaged in 1970. The complex was World Heritage listed in 1991 as part of the Historic Centre of Lima.

    One of the most interesting features of the monastery is the Catacombs. Located below the building is an ossuary and a maze of passageways (said to connect to the cathedral during the time of the Inquisition). they remained in use until 1808 and were re-discovered in 1943. One of the features is a pit of bones and skulls arranged in a circular design.

    When I visited I was disappointed not to be able to take photos - even without a flash.

    Open daily from 09.30 am to 05.45 pm.

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  • MJL's Profile Photo

    Some may not like the catacombs

    by MJL Written Mar 16, 2010

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    The monumental set of buildings of San Francisco of Lima, is the most representative jewel of the viceregal architecture of Peru, being the most beautiful colonial complex located in the historical center of the city. The buildings of this remarkable set are churches of San Francisco, La Soledad and El Milagro, that together with the courtyards and annexed are known the MONASTERY OF SAN FRANCISCO.

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  • thebeatsurrender's Profile Photo

    Convento de San Francisco

    by thebeatsurrender Updated Jun 19, 2007

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    Exquisite interiors and courtyards highlight San Francisco Monastary -- in my opinion the highlight of our day in Central Lima. There was no English tour when we went. We tagged along for a Spanish tour for a few minutes before giving up, but it was just as well. The best part was wandering the halls and stairways of the monastary by ourselves, discovering what was around the next corner. Down a long hallway, the light filtering through rows of arches... up a staircase to overlook the richly colored church interior... down into the darkness of the catacombs...

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  • Tom_In_Madison's Profile Photo

    Old nice church with bones....

    by Tom_In_Madison Written May 26, 2007

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    From the 17th century(1674), this is a really nice old church.

    The catacombs contain skulls and leg bones of about 75,000 people, some of them monks that used to live here. It's really pretty bizarre. They often have been stacked in eerie geometric patterns.

    Open: Mon - Sunday 9:30am - 5:30pm

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