Lima Warnings and Dangers

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Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Lima

  • staindesign's Profile Photo

    Pinochitos to the Rescue!

    by staindesign Written Aug 12, 2009

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    These pinochitos are around during holidays and protests. The gov't uses these trucks to spray the crowds when they get rowdy or begin to riot. I'm told by a Peruvian source the water is something like pepperspray. So take precautions!

    pinochitos

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  • A Few Mosquitos in Lima

    by alohagunnar Written Mar 31, 2009

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    Some of the older hotels in Lima don't have screened windows and a couple of mosquitos will eventually find you deep asleep. You can buy effective (just say)"Mosquito Repellent" at any pharmacy here for US$6/ 18 Soles. Why don't they screen the windows? Am I the only one who got bitten? I never got bitten walking around outside, only late at night in my room.

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    Avoid Taxi Green at Lima Airport!

    by GmoArg Written Mar 26, 2009

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    The moment you exit the baggage claim area, you will be intercepted by drivers of "Taxi Green", which are the "official airport taxis." They claim to be safe and to have nice cars but you will pay dearly for it. A trip to Miraflores with this service will cost you 45/50 soles or even 35 dollars depending how tourist you look. Avoid them and walk outside to take a white cab (make sure it is a real cab and that the license is written on the side) which will cost you much less. For example, a trip to Miraflores cost me on March 19 only 30 soles. Taxi green drivers are very obnoxious so you will really need to get nasty with them to get them to stop following you.

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Taking photos in Museums

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 28, 2009

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    Taking photos without a flash in a dark place like a church, or in a museum or aquarium requires a little more care than most tourist photography. The problems to be addressed are

    * Flash reflection,
    * General reflections,
    * Under exposure and
    * Blur.

    Most of these pictures demonstrate Blur, but photo 4 also shows the problem with Under Exposure which is that the photo will become QUITE grainy if you attempt to correct the under exposure.

    First - make sure you know how your camera works. In particular know how to turn off the flash. If flash is even allowed, it reflects off the glass cases and blanks out what is inside. This is also true for taking pictures out the window of a bus because flash will reflect off the bus window. Even if you do not get flash reflection, unless you are careful, there will still be reflections of the surrounds in the glass. Since I do know how to turn off my flash, the only Lima photo that I have which illustrates this in any way is photo five where there is a small hot spot caused by someone else's flash

    Second - know that there is a difference between film photography and digital photography for a dark area. A film camera can be set for an f-stop and will actually take the photo at that setting regardless of whether the film will be underexposed or not. Then in the developing of the film some of the underexposure can be rectified. The problem is that no one does that anymore.

    Unless you set a digital camera NOT to do an automatic exposure, it will make the exposure as long as is required to get the picture. This means that it will extend the exposure time. When the exposure time gets longer, you will no longer be able to hold the camera still and the photo will be blurred.

    There are several things you can do to reduce the blur.
    a) Know how to set your camera so that it does not do automatic exposure. I confess that I've not done this.
    b) Be sure that you hold your camera as still as possible. Using the viewfinder, pressing the camera against your eye and holding your breath while pressing the shutter will give you the best chance. Or if you can brace the camera (or yourself) against a railing or wall that will also help.

    Blurred photo with reflections in the glass Slightly blurred photo in the Larcos museum Not holding the camera still enough Partly corrected underexposure Reflections and hot spot
    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Warning Posters

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 15, 2009

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    I thought it very interesting that I could see posters hanging on the light poles in Lima warning against various illegal and antisocial acts. Mostly if we had posters like this it would be advertising an exhibition or some municipal event. But that wasn't what these were.

    Not just detour signs or a sign on a barricade on a work site saying "Thanks for letting us work", or signs on crosswalks saying "Respect Pedestrians" (photo 3)

    Not just against drugs (illegal in most places)

    But also against graffiti (I still saw some - photo 4- 5, but not as much as might be expected), against drinking in public and "Orinar" "en la via publica". The picture was of a man's back.

    So put away your spray can, and don't Orinar in the street.

    Don't do any of these in the public view Graffiti costs 1,000 Si/ Thanks for letting us work & Respect pedestrians Graffiti More graffiti
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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    No photography

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 23, 2009

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    There were two places where no photography was allowed. One we knew about in advance and that was the Gold Museum. In that case I think it is fear of theft and also they want to sell you souvenirs. (Although I understand that as much as 85% of the items on display there are fake)

    The other was the San Francisco Church and Monastery. The guide said she did not know why photography was prohibited there. Again I think that they want to sell you their postcards and souvenirs.

    I took a photo of the sign at the admission desk (photo 3) and was chastised. I also took two pictures inside - one of the courtyard and a picture of the tile on the wall (photo 2) without a problem (no one saw me), but another lady on the tour took one and was told she could not even take pictures of the plants in the courtyard. One of the other ladies said it was for reasons of privacy, but that is total bunk. Of course the guide was calling this a convent, so maybe she thought there were actually nuns living here.

    Courtyard in the monastery Wall tile Admission prices sign - I was yelled at for this Outside - a tower Sentinal to be sure no one takes photos?
    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • risse73's Profile Photo

    Commonsense needed, otherwise it's a safe city

    by risse73 Updated Jul 16, 2008

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    You constantly hear all this chatter about the dangers present in Lima. Although I cannot guarantee all travelers to be 100% SAFE all the time (like I was), I can tell you that your visit to Lima does not have to end up traumatic with a few commonsense precautions:

    *Put valuable documents (passport, driver's license), credit cards, and cash in your money belt all the time

    *Use bags/purses for all other needed items (e.g., sunglass, lip balm, kleenex, etc.). You can hand this "worthless" bag/purse in a robbery (God forbid!).

    *Do not wear any jewelry or expensive watches (you're just inviting trouble)

    *Upon arrival or departure--make sure that all your luggages/belongings are safely in the trunk of the car/taxi and also that any bag/purse you have with you must be put under the seat of the car because I was warned by my driver that there have been incidences of general theft of tourists and locals a few miles around the airport area.

    Otherwise, Lima is like any other city (New York, etc.) with its share of crime infused with its urban setting. Do enjoy your trip to the wonderful city of Lima!!!

    A busy street scene in downtown Lima
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  • rob12c's Profile Photo

    safety

    by rob12c Written Jun 24, 2008

    I justt finished travelling through South America and spent about a week in Lima. As for safety there, it is the same as everywhere else. Nearly every city i went to in South America people kept saying i should beware because its dangerous but i always seem to find that this was untrue. It was just the same as Australia and everywhere else i have been. You have your good areas and bad areas. Tourists dont go to bad areas so she will be fine. I met heaps of female travellers around the same age travelling alone and they had no problem. So dont worry to much she will be fine and will have an awsome time.

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  • Airport pick up and hotel transfers in Lima

    by dagustin Written Jun 22, 2008

    I agree with nhoolb ("have the hotel/hostel to arrange transportation") but I would ask the hotel at the time of booking with them for either the driver's name or make sure that the driver that will be waiting for your daughter at the airport will have the hotel booking code that has been provided to you in advance as proof of being the correct driver. I am sorry to tell that there have been "fake hotel transfer" cases at the Jorge Chavez and as a result tourist have lost everything they had.

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  • SheLuvz2Fly's Profile Photo

    Lima - Purse Snatchers

    by SheLuvz2Fly Written Jun 7, 2008

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    Like most cities....be careful with your purse or wallet. As our cab driver made a point to ask me {as we were driving through the city of Lima}...to not have my purse in plain view, particularly as we were at a stop light....that there had been occasions where there were purse-snatchers.
    I had no problem and felt quite safe in this city!

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  • ROCKARIA's Profile Photo

    no specific danger

    by ROCKARIA Written Apr 26, 2008

    As the posts before me well explained Lima is a rather quite safe place to be and i have travelled all over peru and the people are very friendly towards all tourists of all nationalities especially americans.
    One have to always takes the necessary precautions as in any city.

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  • Robin922's Profile Photo

    Every City Has a Bad Area

    by Robin922 Written Mar 20, 2008

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    Every city has it bad areas of town, and Lima is no different. Unfortunately the bad area of town will most likely be the first thing you see when you arrive. Think about it as a rule ship ports and airports have a tendency to bring down residential property value... people with money don't want to have to listen to the noise.

    Once you step outside the airport it's time to get your guard up. Keep belongs close. Most drivers will automatically lock the doors, but if your car doesn't have the air on, remember to keep your purse, camera and such in the middle of the back seat and to roll you window up a bit at the red lights. I haven't heard of any violent crime, but several locals have warned me about grab and runs in the area.

    It you aren't a seasoned traveler or a woman traveling solo, you might have your hotel send a driver for you. The average rate is $30 which is about $10 more than you would normally pay, but it can be money well spent. Let the hotel know what flight you are arriving on and the driver will be in the terminal waiting for you when you clear customs.

    This paid off for me on my last trip. We arrived 3 hours late, then I got a 'red light' in customs... another hour delay. By the time I cleared everything it was 2 am! My hotel driver was there waiting for me, and I was happy to see him.

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  • Robin922's Profile Photo

    Rules of the Road

    by Robin922 Written Mar 16, 2008

    There are a lot of warnings on this subject, and a good reason for it.
    Size matters! A big truck out ranks a car, and a car out ranks a pedestrian.

    I wouldn’t suggest driving here for the average person! If you are faint hearted, you may wish to close you eyes while riding in the taxi.

    Red lights appear to be an option, people turn left from the right lane, and right from the left lane. If there is a traffic jam, they may just go down the middle of the cars, making a two lane into a three lane. I’ve was even in a car that drove on the wrong side of the street for several blocks.

    The excessive blowing of horns and yelling at each other isn’t road rage, but local culture.

    The good news, the odds are you will get to your destination in one piece. While they do have the occasional fender benders, they don’t ever appear to have enough speed to have serious accidents.

    Related to:
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  • K-nalla's Profile Photo

    Pirañitas

    by K-nalla Written Nov 26, 2007

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    Pirañitas are groups of 20-30 children (up to 10-12 y.o.) that come in groups and will mug you. They are not cute, and outrunning them is quite hard. Stay in well lighted places. They mainly work in downtown Lima, Acho and the area crossing the river toward Cerro SanCristobal.
    On the same subject, if a single child comes asking you for money, please dont give him any, there is an adult (who ownes them) around the corner waiting for him to come back with money. Instead, if you want to do something, get him something to eat. Thanks

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  • LAN Peru Scam

    by karpowij Written Oct 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If changing planes in Lima for a flight elsewhere in the country, be careful of scams perpetrated by LAN Peru employees. My American Airlines flight from Miami was delayed (I was told it is delayed 80% of the time). We arrived in Lima about 45 minutes before my connecting fllight to Cusco. Several others on the plane had already missed theirs. We were told by LAN Peru that American had called them to infiorm them we would be late so my seat was cancelled along with about 25 others. We were told that since it was Easter, they were totally booked for 2 weeks but we would be put on a stand-by list. One by one, we were called to the side by a "helpful" airport employee and offered a seat on the next flight for $200 cash. As I was tired and eager to get to Cusco, I paid the money. Once on the plane, there were at least 10 empty seats despite the others on my flight waiting standby who refused to pay the extra. Consider staying in Lima overnight or leave several hours between your connecting flights.

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