Iquitos Things to Do

  • Bird
    Bird
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  • Dock at Tapiche Ohara
    Dock at Tapiche Ohara
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  • Insect with many legs
    Insect with many legs
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Most Recent Things to Do in Iquitos

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    Deep Jungle Trip up the Tapiche River

    by amyharmony Written Aug 1, 2011

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    Tapiche River
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    New in 2011. There is a new destination deep in the Amazon, 340km up river from Iquitos, Peru called Tapiche Ohara's Reserve. I went there in May 2011 and found it to be way off the beaten track in terms of typical jungle tour locations. It takes a day to get there from Iquitos. Requena is the last "town" along the way and the Reserve is yet another five hours by boat. You get to see lots of wild life along the way (including river dolphins) and pass several Amazon villages. The scenery slowly changes as one travels on the Maranon, Amazon, Ucayali, and Tapiche Rivers. I got to see an overwhelming assortment of monkeys, birds, plants, fish, and insects. You can sleep in hammocks or beds, there are bathrooms with showers and toilets, and meals are cooked for you. If I were a zoologist or botanist, I would definitely want to spend some time here. The long distance away is worth it!

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  • Jungletravel in iquitos for all kind of people

    by iquitoslover Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Iquitos the city that lay on a island in the middl of the jungle. You can reach it by plain, 1.5 hour from Lima or by boat from Tarapoto or Pucalpa that taks 3 to 5 days.
    In the city you can arrange your own trip to the jungle or by internet. You can make a expencife trip to luxery lodges or you can make a basic trip and make adventure trekkings into the primairy forest. For all kind of people there is something to do.
    If you stay close to the city whit his 350.000 people you see some animals, but if you go far from Iquitos, you stay in paradise.
    In the Amazon you can see the gray or the pink dolfins. They are realy beauty to see, playing or fishing. You can ask at the guides to swim whit these beauty animals. A realy nice experiance!
    You can piraña fishing, caiman cathing and relise, study about the medicinal plants and insects, there so math to do.
    The best way to know it all is to visit this paradise.

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  • Jungletravel around Iquitos

    by iquitoslover Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Iquitos the city that lay on a island in the middl of the jungle. You can reach it by plain, 1.5 hour from Lima or by boat from Tarapoto or Pucalpa that taks 3 to 5 days.
    In the city you can arrange your own trip to the jungle or by internet. You can make a expencife trip to luxery lodges or you can make a basic trip and make adventure trekkings into the primairy forest. For all kind of people there is something to do.
    If you stay close to the city whit his 350.000 people you see some animals, but if you go far from Iquitos, you stay in paradise.
    In the Amazon you can see the gray or the pink dolfins. They are realy beauty to see, playing or fishing. You can ask at the guides to swim whit these beauty animals. A realy nice experiance!
    You can pira?a fishing, caiman cathing and relise, study about the medicinal plants and insects, there so math to do.
    The best way to know it all is to visit this paradise.

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    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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    Bird watching Birding Iquitos Guide

    by vdeva Updated Sep 9, 2010
    Walter Soplin Culqui Iquitos Bird Guide
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    I did do a day trip into the jungle outside Iquitos with Walter Soplin Culqui at wacho@lycos.com cell: 965303113 Walter speaks English quite well. We went on an Iquitos city bus on the road toward Nahua to the Alpahuayo National Reserve. Walter is a talented and enthusiastic birder. He can really point out birds and find them by their sounds which you have to be able to do with the low light in the jungle. In the couple of hours we walked in the jungle and road the bus along the road we saw Yellow browed Tyrannulet, Black-billed Saltater, Swallow-winged Puffbird, Widge-billed Woodcreeper, Screaming Piha, Buff-throated Wren, Blue Crowned Mannikin, Parroqui Nightjar, White- spot Antbird, Black Spotted Barbet, Roadside Hawks. We saw a Hot Lips Flower with Blue Berries. A group of black caterpillars on the trail inching along in a mass about the size of my hand, Almadillo Holes, Brown and White termite nests which Walter stuck his hand into one and then mashed up the termites in his hands to show me how they smelled and that hunters would use the smell to mask their own human scent. Fascinating day....good to be with a bird guide....he doesn't have a book or didn't that day so bring one. He used to guide with a local company but struck out on his own. He charged me about $25-$30 US dollars to guide me for the day. I paid my and his transport on the bus which was minimal. His email again is wacho@lycos.com His mobil # is 965303113 and home phone is 51-065-787215 to call from outside Peru.

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    One of the best jungle adventures

    by vdeva Updated Sep 9, 2010

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    Red faced monkey
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    If you are in Iquitos take the time to visit Padre Cocha and the Butterfly Farm. The amazon animal orphanage and Pilpintuwasi butterfly farm was an amazing experience for us. We had the tour by the founder, Gudrun Sperrer which just made a fascinating time for us. She told us how she has felt about the project over years and I admire her for all she has done there. Check out her website www.amazonanimalorphanage.org The butterfly tent is fascinating too. If you have $ to spare donate to this place. Not a zoo but an animal sanctuary and butterfly research facility. She takes on some volunteers also. Met a couple of women from England volunteering here.

    Take the boat from the outskirts of Iquitos to Padre Cocha. The village is also interesting and stop along the streets for Coconuts and talk to people there, many of whom have extensive knowledge of the area and the environmental projects.

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  • JessieLang's Profile Photo

    The Market

    by JessieLang Written Jun 13, 2009

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    Iquitos Marketplace

    There is a big local marketplace, where vendors were selling fruits, vegetables, live chickens, and everything imaginable. People shop every day for the groceries they need that day. It is a busy place, crowded with people, merchandise and moto-taxis.

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    Eiffel House

    by JessieLang Written Jun 13, 2009

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    Eiffel House
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    There are some beautiful older houses in the downtown area with imported tile and balconies. They were built by wealthy rubber barons in the 1880s. The iron house is one of the most interesting buildings in town. It was built by Eiffel for the Paris Exposition in 1898. A wealthy businessman had it dismantled, shipped down the Amazon, and reassembled in Iquitos. It now houses a restaurant and bar.

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    Take a boat to Belen

    by JessieLang Written Jun 13, 2009

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    Belen
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    Belén is a giant floating shantytown that has been here since the early 1900s. Some houses are on stilts; others are built on rafts that rise and fall with the river. Population is 20-30,000. Sewage goes straight to the river, which is also their source of drinking water. It is a different world!

    We passed houses, small businesses, and lots of bars with music playing. Vendors sold food from canoes, and one of them was willing to come over to us and show us what she had. Nothing goes to waste—she was selling chicken feet on a skewer for 1 sole. She also had some fruits and vegetables and shaped balls of mashed corn. (Our guide didn't let us eat any of it--probably not a good idea!)

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    Cruise the Amazon

    by JessieLang Written Jun 13, 2009

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    Amazon village

    I spent a week on a riverboat on the Amazon and its tributaries, and it was an incredible experience. One of the best parts was meeting local people in the villages we passed.

    Please see my Departamento de Loreto pages for travelogues, more tips and photos.

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  • dsilzer's Profile Photo

    Amazon travel from Peru

    by dsilzer Written Sep 4, 2008

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    Gerson's village
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    You could not make a better decision than to go with Gerson Pizango - a man with integrity, knowledge, and intelligence who lives in the Amazon and knows it as his backyard. Email him at amazonguideservices@gmail.com. He is awesome!!
    Denise
    denise_silzer@sd34.bc.ca

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    Amazon adventure

    by Jelapprand Written May 28, 2008

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    Hello,
    my friend and I are in Iquitos right now and we just finished an excellent six-night trip into the Amazon with a very good local guide named Gerson. He is from a local village on the Ucayali river about 260 km from Iquitos, so deep in the jungle -- be ready, there's no pre-packaged tourism here, just raw adventure. But we had an amazing time if that is what you are looking for, we went deep into the jungle and saw much wildlife and many animals. Gerson is very learned about all of the plants and animals and is so enthusiastic about his home. He works solo, but is hoping to create a company one day just for the local people of the Amazon villages.
    From his village we went much deeper and camped on the Cumaseva creek. The only people we saw were local fishermen and there were very few, and maybe two other tourists, but that was just on the way to our camp and we passed a jungle lodge.
    If you went with Gerson you would get to know a person who is very genuinely interested in making the selva known to you! A solid good guide.
    We went caiman spotting at night, we also went for nighttime walks through the jungle searching for tarantulas and scorpions (came across a huge poisonous snake), and by day we saw sloths, many birds (king fishers and birds of prey), monkeys. We also searched for anaconda, but couldn't find any -- you might be more lucky. Gerson also has a vast knowledge of the plant life in the jungle, and showed us many food-bearing and medicinal plants; the man seems to know his way around the whole jungle and we were never worried about getting lost.
    Oh and the last day to top it all off we swam with pink dolphins where the Amazon river begins (where the Ucayali and Marañon rivers meet). That was the most exciting part for me.
    The people were great, we were well taken care of and looked after (bring a book because you will have a lot of free time too) and it was all around an amazing experience. If you want to contact me I can give you all the necessary information to contact him. You would be with a man who is from the heart of it rather than a tour agency so I would highly recommend contacting this man.
    Loads of fun, enjoy, hoping you will go with him!

    Sincerely,
    Jules

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  • Jungle Experience in Iquitos

    by MerlinAmsterdam Written May 22, 2008

    We just got back from our holidays in Peru and went also to the Amazon. from what we understood is that there are basically three Amazon jungle zones open to tourism with good lodges and infrastructure: Manu, Tambopata and Iquitos. Manu is a more expensive and has a lot of animals and birds, Tambopata is cheaper and has less animals to watch and Iquitos is more adventurous and has animals but less than Manu. We chose for the last option also because we loved the idea of sailing upriver deep into the jungle and the combination of culture and nature. We visited a jungle village, NO tribes and dances were set up for us. We just walked their an no special attention to us. We booked through Aventuras de oro, who did a great job. info@aventuras-de-oro.com

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    Go to a Jungle Lodge

    by thebeatsurrender Updated Jun 20, 2007

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    Iquitos is the place to book various jungle lodges, which will allow you to stay in the Amazon and see the jungle close up. There are various lodges to choose from. The more luxury choices are the Explorama lodges, which have the canopy tour and I think one of them even has a water slide. We went with the Muyuna Lodge mainly because its office was across the street from where we were drinking (right next to the main square -- most the other lodge offices are in a different part of town), and because one of the locals we were drinking with said it was pretty good. I got the feeling that Muyuna was a more... granola... lodge than others, what with the kumbaya guitars in the "lobby" cabin, the optional vegetarian fare and the big group of hippies on an ayahuasca trip. The location is excellent -- all the cabins are on a raised platform and the river comes up over the ground in the high season. No electricity, FYI -- the place is lit by lanterns an candles, and good luck keeping secrets as are the walls are basically mosquito nets. Fun fact -- I'm pretty sure that dude from Travel Sick went to the Muyuna lodge as when I saw the Peru episode I was totally like "I know that blue chair!!" My only beef was the main guide didn't really give us much information on what to do (He assumed we knew how to dress for the jungle and how to put on mud boots, etc. Then, when us city kids were all like "huh?" he went off with the two more experienced lodgers because we were too slow).

    There are lots of other options, as you will see when you get to the airport as people will try to steer you toward different lodges. The further away you get, the more untouched the jungle is and the more wildlife you will see.

    The lodges run about $100 a day, which is pricey, but the jungle is so awesome. Included in the price is a guide, meals and 2-3 activities a day like pirahna fishing, visiting a village, a walk through the jungle and evening wildelife spotting on the river.

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  • Explorama Lodges

    by flyingrn Written Jun 5, 2007

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    We stayed at 3 of the Explorama Lodges while in the Upper Amazon region in September 2006. We found them to be well run, the food and services excellent. Ceiba Tops is the nearest to Iquitos being about 30 minutes downstream via the Queen of the Amazon. It is upscale, the rooms are equivalent to any mid-line hotel in the US. There is a pool, a hot tub, a beautiful lounge in the main lodge and, believe it or not, internet service! Peter Jenson, the owner and manager said that having a lodge like this one in the jungle makes the area accessible to those who are not able or willing to go further into the jungle and "rough it".

    Another hour downstream is the Explorama Lodge which is considerable more primitive. Again, the food and services were excellent. The rooms were comfortable, potable water was provided, the alarm clock was a military macaw that roosted in the rafters. Roofs were thatched, the beds were covered with mosquito netting and showers were a short walk from any of the rooms. The dining hall was nearby and served, among other things, fantastic pisco sours. They also provided battery charging equipment in the dining room for those of us who hauled laptops around to process photos.

    ExploreNapo Lodge is about an hour further down the Amazon and then the same time up the Napo River. We were welcomed by the campground mascot, a capybara named Charlie who lounged on the deck with the guests. This lodge was also primitive and was as comfortable as Explorama.

    The excursions and hikes provided by Explorama were well done and very informative. Peter Jenson was instrumental in building the canopy walk which is near the ExploreNapo Lodge and goes about 1/3 mile through the tree tops, reaching a height of 118 ft. at the apex. Very much worth the effort.

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    Jungle hikes

    by kzapanta Written Apr 16, 2007

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    naturally filtered jungle juice

    Hiking around the rainforest is fun and dangerous. Its a definite plus going with a guide and to wear calf high rubber booties since its very muddy. There are so many interestind wildlife and fauna we would never have realized if our guide didn't point it out to us. At one point, we passed a small foot long snake was litterally 4 feet away from our legs. He causally said it was a deadly snake and we almost jumped straight back.

    This photo is myself drinking pure water from a water vine. Our guide just cut a vine waited a few seconds then tipped it for us to drink. It was surprizing how much water was in each vine.

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