Puno Favorites

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  • risse73's Profile Photo

    Cheaper Prices in Puno

    by risse73 Updated Mar 26, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I noticed that prices of goods are cheaper in Puno than in any of the Peruvian cities I've been in. The alpaca scarves/sweaters, indigenous crafts, etc. were not only cheap but abundant. Some of the local merchants can be "sweet-talked" into giving you the items for a cheaper price than what they normally ask. Shopping can be a great experience in this part of Peru. Try it!!!

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Women's Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Banks in Puno

    by risse73 Written Mar 26, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you're ever in need of cash, there are major banks available around Puno's busy Lima Street. These banks are right in the vicinity of the Tourist Information Office and are near many shops and eateries. Major banks such as Banco Continental and Banco de Credito can be found. I used Banco Continental's ATM and the transaction was as seamless as it is in the U.S. Peruvian Soles or US Dollars can be dispensed from this bank's ATM.

    Fondest memory: Meeting people, sightseeing, and eating local goodies!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Tourist Information Office

    by risse73 Updated Mar 26, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It may be best to stop at the local tourist information office located in bustling Lima Street (Pasaje Lima 549) at Puno's city center. They offer tourist-related services and practical information. Also, they give out a map.

    One of the other tourists led me to this office and told me that they set up her tour to Arequipa from Puno for such a great deal! I didn't have a chance to seek tour assistance from this office, but next time I'm in the area, I'll definitely do so. Check them out when you're in town!

    Fondest memory: Meeting wonderful visitors from all over the world!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • risse73's Profile Photo

    Puno: One of the highest poverty rates in Peru!

    by risse73 Written Mar 26, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Puno area of Peru has one of the highest poverty rates in the country. I didn't know this fact until after the guide said it during our tour.

    If you are ever in this area of Peru, here are some tips to be a socially responsible tourist:

    1.) Buy local goods (e.g., buy from street vendors, eat street foods as much as you can, etc.)
    2.) Be more generous with your tips (give at least 35-60% tip for any service rendered)
    3.) Patronize local tour operators/agencies
    4.) Bring something you can donate to a social service agency
    5.) Refer possible visitors to this area of Peru

    Let me know if you have any more ideas with regard to this issue! Do enjoy Puno/Lago Titicaca. It is a place with something to offer its visitors!

    Fondest memory: The excursion to Lago Titicaca by boat!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Arts and Culture

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  • kzapanta's Profile Photo

    Puno facts.

    by kzapanta Written Sep 19, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Uros resident

    Favorite thing: Again, no sense duplicating other VTers work.
    Here are some facts I did not see posted about Puno.

    1.We went in Sept, supposed to be dry, warm season in Peru. It was cold. There are few areas in the world I personaly know that the sun makes a dramatic difference in the immediate temperature. This is the most dramatic to date. The temerature is cozy cool in the daytime if the sun is shining, but as soon as the sun sets, the temp. INSTANTLY drops to FREEZING. Same in the morning, before sun, teeth chattering, get the sun rays on you, take of the other layer of clothing.
    2. Its a big, spread out, unfinished city. Nothing much to see except center of town, Lima Street, and oh yeah, Lake Titiccaca and the floating islands.
    3. Its a good place to get buses, either tourist buses or local buses, down to the Bolivian border and beyond.
    4. Taxi is the fastest way to Juliaca and the airport for your plane flight. Its a full hour driving fast by taxi. Motorbikes taxis would be unwise and the minibuses available would take forever. Fare for the taxi we negotiated was 50 soles for both of us, plus tip.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Backpacking

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Small shops

    by SirRichard Written Jun 7, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Publicidad Cruz

    Favorite thing: Traditional shops are organized in Puno by groups. I mean, all the shoemakers are close, all the printing houses are near and so on.
    Being a graphic designer, I liked specially the "advertising and signs" shops, like the one in this pic. I love those old traditional signs, now almost gorgotten in Europe with all this computerised things...

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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  • nicoleken's Profile Photo

    the Tmbs of Sillustani

    by nicoleken Updated Jul 24, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When you go to Puno near lake Titicaca, you must visit this Tombs of Sillustani.
    The tombs are built above the ground and they are shaped.
    The ancient people in Peru believed in a mother earth that created and regulated life. When a person died, they were mummified in the fetal position, just like they cam into the world. The doors of the tombs face east, because it is believed that that is where the sun is born from the mother earth each and everyday.

    Fondest memory: The mysterious burial towers of Sillustani are called chullpas.

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  • chancay's Profile Photo

    a bit of Uros history

    by chancay Updated Feb 18, 2003

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    the boats made out of totora reeds

    Favorite thing: At times of the Inca the Uros fled to the middle of the lake Titicaca to escape conflicts with Incas and another ethnic group called Collas. During the time there started connections to the Aymaras, a lot of the Uros converted to Catholizism, but there still live the whole year some hundreds of Uros in these islands. You can find a seventh-day-adventist-church on one of the islands, a post office, schools etc.

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    The floating Islands

    by chancay Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    uh, just a

    Favorite thing: Very intersting. You have to go by boat: The people who lives on these islands ask you for entrance you have to pay. You can visit some islands and take a little tour with their boats made out of totora reeds as well as their islands. All the time they have to construct their islands new, because the water is destroying them from above. On the islands they sell a lot of traditional arts.

    Fondest memory: Most funny thing is to see dish antennas on the roofs of these grass-houses on the islands. They produce their energy as well with sun-energy. Impressing!

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    night bus nightmares

    by richiecdisc Updated Feb 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    locals exchange pleasantries during morning tea

    Favorite thing: The marketplace is the best part of Puno. It's not overly touristic, very colorful and great cheap fun just walking around it. Lots of great street food for the adventurous too.

    Fondest memory: The Cuzco to Puno night bus had a particularly bad reputation for theft, but the day bus arrived at an inconvenient time so we opted for the night run. We arrived at the terminal around 11 PM and anxiously boarded the dilapidated bus. Since we had expected the worst, the general appearance of the bus didn’t bother us much, but the small seats did. Peruvians are small in stature in general so the leg room is beyond tight for the average North American or Northern European. We crammed ourselves into our seats along with the hoard of locals and their assorted livestock. On a previous night bus, we had been overly warm so were ill prepared for the nippy conditions we now encountered. This certainly didn’t bother the indigenous locals, as they seemed to carry everything they owned with them and hence had an ample supply of blankets on hand. The driver had been driving like mad and it had been difficult to get much sleep with his taking curves at dangerous speeds that resulted in our being jostled from side to side all night. At one of the last stops, it seemed he didn’t want to go into town to drop a group of Quechua women off at the terminal. It was our first glimpse of the mysterious man behind the curtain who had driven so recklessly all evening. He looked a frantic figure, lanky for Peruvian, with a huge wool hat on and bulging eyes peering from underneath it. He yelled maniacally at the women, who in turn yelled back just as feverously. Of course, we found the whole thing amusing and didn’t quite know what all the fuss was about. Finally, he succumbed, as was a good idea with that many women in an uproar. He drove even more crazily bringing them to the terminal and barely waited for them to make it down the bus steps before flying off through the deserted streets of the small village. (concluded below in Fondest Memory)

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    early bird worm worries

    by richiecdisc Written Feb 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Puno's market is indeed a local affair

    Fondest memory: We tried to get a few more hours sleep before arriving but a boisterous group of men had got on at the last stop, and we couldn’t understand why anyone would want to talk at two in the morning with three hours of a trip left before them. They laughed and talked as we huddled under our jackets to keep warm and at least rest our eyes. The bus pulled into another stop at 3 AM and they luckily got off, but we were intrigued why the bus didn’t pull out in another mad rush right away. The driver came back and yelled in some insane incarnation of Spanish that this was the last stop, Puno! So, the 5 AM arrival that we had chosen over an 11 PM one had become an insane 3AM. Whether we would huddle in the cold empty terminal until daylight or venture out into the dark empty streets in hope of finding a room was the only matter of conjecture. As we now knew the horror stories about the night run from Cuzco to Puno were steeped in at least some truth. .

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Colonial flavour

    by SirRichard Written Jun 7, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The tropic?

    Favorite thing: Wandering around the centre streets you will find many examples of a certain colonial style in architecture, with vivid colours and low buildings. Some balconies were really delicious...

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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  • hanspeter_W.'s Profile Photo

    floating uros islands

    by hanspeter_W. Written Feb 25, 2003

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The islands are constructed of the totora reeds growing along the lake shore. An hour boat trip takes you to three of the islands. Island women sell embroidered tapestries

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism

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