Local traditions and culture in Peru

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Most Viewed Local Customs in Peru

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    More hats

    by SirRichard Written May 6, 2005

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    Every ethnic group has its own distinctive hat. When I was in Pisaq Market I counted up to 4 different types of hat, all in women with traditional dressing. In the pic you can see the most colourful one, with "flowers in their hair", like the hippies of the 60s :-))

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    Main language

    by SirRichard Written May 7, 2005

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    In Peru they speak mainly spanish, though there are words and expressions we don't use back in Spain. In general you could understand all, is just that some words sound funny or inusual, but you get soon used to them.
    Knowing a few words of spanish is so very useful, specially if you have to ask for a street, find where a bus takes you and so on...

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    Other languages

    by SirRichard Written May 7, 2005

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    But there are other languages spoken in Peru. Most of the people from Cuzco and north Titicaca speak QUECHUA, a language spoken by incas. If you go south of Lake Titicaca they speak AYMARA, and in the jungle the different tribes have different dialects.

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    Beers

    by nenzo Updated Jan 18, 2004

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    Peruvians prefer to drink Peruvian beers, and the 3 most famous are Pilsen, Cristal and Cusqueña. Beers are sold in 3 different bottles, 330 ml, 620 ml and 1100 ml. The big beer containing 1100 ml is often called "un margarito". It is hard to give a favourite of these, but if I had to choose I think it would be Pilsen. The prices for the beers are almost always identical. For the beers on the picture I paid 4.75 soles for the bottle of 620 ml and 6.85 soles for the margarito

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    Red Wines

    by nenzo Updated Dec 20, 2003

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    Different from Chile and Argentina, Peru doesn't export much wines to Europe. Therefore, as the big lover of red wines I am, I was very curious about tasting the local vino tintos. The most common in Lima is the peruvian Tacama Gran tinto and the chilean "Casillero del diablo". Both are excellent wines. Without being 100% sure, I think Tacama is the best and most famous in Peru. On my picture you will see the Tacama Gran tinto which I bought for only 17 soles in a super market. There is also the more expensive Tacama selección especial to the price of 36 soles. This one I haven't tasted yet, but since the bottle on the picture is mine it won't last long... :-)

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    Inca Kola

    by nenzo Written Dec 20, 2003

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    A famous Peruvian non-alcoholic soft drink. I cannot compare it to any softdrink I know to describe it better, but it is yellow and tastes very sweet. btw don't expect it to taste anything similar to Coca Cola or Pepsi Cola.... It doesn't. I paid 1.70 soles for the bottle on the picture.

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    panetón

    by nenzo Updated Dec 21, 2003

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    A panetón is a sweet fruitcake sold in Peru at christmas time. It is very popular among the locals. There are several different brands, and they vary in price and quality. The panetón on the picture is one of the best, and cost approximately 17 soles.

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    Inca Kola, La Bebida Del Peru

    by calcaf38 Written Mar 4, 2005

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    I had read about Inca Kola, the hilariously named Peruvian soda. I couldn't wait to try it.

    So I ordered one the first chance I got, in the old 727 of Aerocontinente over the Andes.

    From the color, I expected something lemony, but the flavor was bubble-gum, and very sweet. No wonder Peruvian smiles often flash with gold!

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    Drinking custom

    by melosh Written Dec 11, 2004

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    In the Juli plaza on Lake Titicaca these dancers take a break and introduce me to the Andian beer drinking custom. (The men dressed in suits are also dancers.) One cup and a large bottle. You are first given the bottle, the giver empties the cup in kind of a toast, and then passes you the cup which you fill before passing the bottle on to the next drinker. You toast that drinker, pass on the cup and await the next bottle. Yes, there may be multiple bottles making the rounds so one quickly learns to only put a little into your cup each time. Staying sober at this altitude with the Peruvian generous attitude can be a challenge.

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    Hats

    by SirRichard Written May 6, 2005

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    In Peru women wear traditionally hats, while most men wear just caps or nothing.
    The most common hats are a kind of bowler hats, I guess they come from some old caps wore by europeans here in 19th century. These are common in Bolivia too.

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    Festivities

    by christian99 Written Jan 3, 2005

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    Fiesta de la Cruz (across Peru): The Festival of the Cross isn't as solemnly Catholic as it might sound. Best in Lima, Cusco, and Ica, the festival does features cross processions (although the decorated crosses are vibrant), but it also displays a surfeit of folk music and dance, the highlight being the daring "scissors dancers," who once performed on top of churches.

    El Señor de los Milagros (Lima): The Artist Once Again Known as Prince would love this highly religious procession, with tens of thousands of participants all clad in bright purple. The Lord of Miracles, the largest procession in South America, lasts a full 24 hours. It venerates a miraculous painting of Jesus Christ, which was created by an Angolan slave and survived the devastating 1746 earthquake, even though almost everything around it was felled.

    Inti Raymi (Cusco): The Festival of the Sun, one of the greatest pageants in South America, celebrates the winter solstice and honors the Inca sun god with a bounty of colorful Andean parades, music, and dance. It takes over Cusco and transforms the Sacsayhuamán ruins overlooking the city into a majestic stage.

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    FESTIVITIES2

    by christian99 Written Jan 3, 2005

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    VIRGEN DEL CARMEN (Paucartambo): The tiny, remote Andean colonial village of Paucartambo is about 4 hours from Cusco, but it hosts one of Peru's wildest festivals. Its 3 days of dance, revelry, drinking, and outlandish, scary costumes pack in thousands who camp all over town (there's almost nowhere to stay) and then wind up at the cemetery.

    VIRGEN DE LA CANDELARIA(Puno): Puno, perhaps the epicenter of Peruvian folklore, imbues its festivals with a unique vibrancy. Candlemas (or Virgen de la Candelaria), which is spread over 2 weeks, is one of the greatest folk religious festivals in South America, with an explosion of music, dance, and some of the most fantastic costumes and masks seen anywhere.

    PUNO WEEK (Puno): Puno, the fiesta capital of Peru, rises to the occasion for a full week every November to mark its Amerindian roots. A huge procession from Lake Titicaca into town remembers the legend of the first Inca emperor, who emerged from the world's highest navigable lake to establish the Inca Empire. The procession deviates into dance, music, and oblivion.

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    more language (slang) tips

    by chancay Written Jun 6, 2003

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    parts of a list I found in the internet:

    English ...... Peruvian slang

    Friend = pata (or) carreta
    something cool = es chevere (or) es bacan
    police officer = tombo
    thief = choro
    omnibus (van) = combi
    nice guy = gallada
    police station = la comica
    young woman = gila
    brown nose = sobón
    gay = maricón (or) ñoco
    pretty woman = churro
    have a lot of money = tiene bastante mosca (or) guita
    have a party = pachanga
    security guard = huachimán
    tips = propinas
    whistle blower = soplón
    paper boy = canillita
    jail = chirona
    bald head = pelado
    job = chamba
    private eye = tira
    succer = froilán
    howdy = hola
    bye = chao
    see you later = nos vemos
    woman = jerma
    brawler = bochinchero
    whiner = ayayero
    soccer = futbol
    handsome fellow = piedrón
    friend = pata, chochera, choche (EU)
    something chever = maldito, paja, chevere, bacan, aluscinante (EU)
    pretty woman, good-looking guy = cuero(EU)
    girlfriend = hembrita (EU)
    boyfriend, girlfriend = machuca fuerte (EU)
    jail = cana (EU)
    No way! = arranca! (EU)
    sleep = jatear (EU)
    boring = tela (EU)
    stupid, dumb = monse (EU)
    to party = tonear (EU)
    drink (alcohol) = chupar (EU)
    to eat = jamear (EU)
    come with me = hazme la taba (EU)
    throw up = buitrear (EU)
    restroom = ñoba (EU)
    thsirt = polo (EU)
    guy = cuñado, amigo (EU)
    mother = vieja (EU)
    father = viejo (EU)
    house = jato (EU)
    truck = mionca (EU)
    to walk = latear (EU)
    circle of friends = collera (EU)
    to kiss (tongue) = agarrar (EU)
    to go out and try to score with no pretty girls = bagrear (EU)
    person = punta (EU)

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    Tabues

    by christian99 Written Nov 16, 2004

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    Homosexuality is legal in Peru but you should be aware that social attitudes generally are fairly conservative. Any outward display of homosexual behaviour is likely to be frowned upon.

    An agreement on the border demarcation line with Ecuador was signed in 1998. However you should still exercise discretion in the border area and avoid taking photographs of anything of a military nature there and elsewhere within the country.

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    Inca flag versus gay flag

    by B_Lacombe Written Mar 29, 2003

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    Along with the peruvian flag, you may noticed a flag that looks like the gay flag, but it is not. It is the inca nation flag. Actually they are quite upset that the international gay used that flag. For the incas, the rainbow is created by Inti, Sun-god so it is logical to use it as a symbol where for the gay community, it is the notion of diversity of color in harmony that retains their attention to use it as a symbol.

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