What to pack for Peru

  • What to Pack
    by tedandtina
  • A stop in the trail
    A stop in the trail
    by SirRichard
  • What to Pack
    by MBSTO

Most Viewed What to Pack in Peru

  • butterfly_girl's Profile Photo

    Inca Trail Packing List

    by butterfly_girl Updated May 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Miscellaneous: The essential items for your trip on the Inca Trail are: Water, toilet paper, Headlamp & flashlight, rain jacket, thick socks, 2 pairs of comfortable walking shoes (worn in!), moist towelettes, warm sleeping clothes, 2 or 3 lightweight shirts that wick away moisture, 2 pairs of zip off pants (not cotton), a comfortable, sturdy backpack, a good water holder to strap around your waist, snacks, medicine in case of sickness, blister block, camera/film ( throw away panoramic is nice), 45 sunscreen, sunglasses and a hat. I made the mistake of bringing too much. Once you start hiking, you don't have much time to go through your pack, so just bring the items that you absolutely need.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel
    • Camping

    Was this review helpful?

  • mad4travel's Profile Photo

    Going into the Jungle

    by mad4travel Updated Aug 23, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: Waterproof bags

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Waterproofs - it rains a lot. A rain cape is a good idea, looks a bit stupid but gives excellent ventilation in the heat .You can also put it over your daypack at the risk of looking like the hunchback of Notre Dam!
    T shirts/Trousers that dry quickly- everything gets damp here
    More clothes than you think you'll need. Everything gets wet quickly either from rain or you sweating buckets and you'll need to change clothing often
    Neutral coloured clothing. Bright colours can frighten the wildlife.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Anti malarials
    Antiseptic wipes/lotions etc
    Mosquito repellent/after bite
    Sun lotion (above SPF 15, preferable 30. The sun is very strong)
    Sun hat - my God its so hot there!
    antibacterial alcohol based hand wash & tissues to use as toilet paper

    Photo Equipment: batteries
    plastic bag to protect camera
    Zoom lens for photographing wildlife
    binoculars for wildlife spotting

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: torch
    headtorch for night hikes
    battery operated fan if you don't like the heat and humidity

    Miscellaneous: Acidophilis(friendly bacteria capsules) buy them from health shops, helps protects against runny bottoms and tummy upsets!

    It all looks like this!
    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Toilet Paper !!!!

    by Pinguino Written Dec 1, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Most all public restrooms do not have toilet paper or soap. I would highly suggest always having some on hand, as well as some hand sanitizer. Also -- do not put the toilet paper in the toilet, but in the trash can next to the toilet. Some places have signs telling you this but it's a general rule to help the poor plumbing.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • sweetbean's Profile Photo

    Don't forget the sunblock!

    by sweetbean Updated May 12, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: If you can avoid bringing large suitcases with you, do it. The streets in Cusco aren't really paved. They're more like tiles and cobblestones, and are really narrow. If you have large luggage it would be very difficult to maneuver. If you can't avoid it, arrange for a car to take you where you need to go so that you don't need to drag your luggage all over. Small luggage and backpacks are highly recommended.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Good hiking boots and comfortable walking shoes/sneakers are a must. Because the majority of the streets aren't really paved, you'll need good, comfortable shoes with a good thick sole for walking around. People don't really get dressed up too much (not that we saw, anyway), so there's no need for women to bring high heeled shoes. You'd just be miserable and probably end up breaking your neck. The streets can also get pretty slippery when wet, so keep that in mind. Pack an umbrella, and make sure to bring a jacket. We were there during the first week of May which is the beginning of the dry season and heading towards their winter, and it got pretty cold at night (40's F). It'd just be colder at night, the deeper into their winter it gets. You should also pack a hat of some sort to protect you from the sun. We also had hiking pants that zipped off into shorts, and they came in handy on our hikes. When we got too hot, we just zipped the legs off and tossed them in our backpack.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Pack some headache medicine in case the high altitude gives you a headache. I'd recommend packing some immodium or kaopectate for those "unexpected" issues. Also, bring a really good sunblock with a high SPF (30 or over). The high elevation and the proximity to the equator make the sun very strong. Even on cool, cloudy days the sun is very strong, so don't let it fool you. My husband and I learned that the hard way and have the weird sunburn lines to show for it...

    Photo Equipment: Camera, batteries (and recharger), film, extra memory cards, tripod. There are so many things that are picture-worthy, so don't be caught unprepared!

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: We didn't camp out, but I'd suggest a warm sleeping bag because the nights were pretty cold (40's F).

    Street in Cusco (one of the wider ones!)
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • epicult's Profile Photo

    Moskitos, cameras and toilet paper

    by epicult Updated May 5, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: If venturing into the Amazon (especially in wet season) be sure to have great waterproof gear! Not only great waterproof gear, but light coloured waterproof gear.

    Upon purchasing my brand spankin' new 'black' gore-tex jacket, I couldn't have kicked myself harder. And, being a seasoned Canadian backwoods guy, I should have known better.

    Black (dark colours) = many mosquitoes
    Light colours = far fewer mosquitoes

    Don't be foolish like myself unless you want to be sorrounded by 'hundreds' of these little critters!.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Bring alot of toilet paper!

    Photo Equipment: Wrap your camera good as it is very humid in the jungle and it WILL reak havoc on your gear

    Amazon on a dry day :-)
    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Have backpack will travel....

    by richiecdisc Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: Backpacks offer not only the means to do multi-day hiking trips but also are the most practical for getting from the bus station to the hostel without having to shell out for a taxi.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Rain gear is essential for backpacking trips in the Cordillera Blanca or Inca Trail.

    Doreen sports a pack on the Santa Cruz Trek
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sunblock -- Do NOT leave without it!

    by Pinguino Written Dec 1, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Wow, sunblock is essential like most people here point out. We were really stupid and went out one day on a low altitude, cloudy sky hike and ended up being so sunburned that we were in bed a full day suffering. Completey stupid of us, and it was a day wasted that easily could've been avoided had we ONLY FOLLOWED THE OTHER TIPS!!! :-) So please, listen when people say -- cover yourself in sunblock no matter what!! We saw so many other burnt faces it's just not worth it.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • canuckmike's Profile Photo

    Quechua Phrasebook

    by canuckmike Written Aug 18, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Miscellaneous: If you are planning to get well off the beaten path or want to impress the local native population, bring a Quechua phrasebook. Quechua is the language of the Incas and is spoken through a good portion of Peru and other countries.

    My Quechua Phrasebook

    Was this review helpful?

  • coolswizzle's Profile Photo

    must haves

    by coolswizzle Updated Jul 15, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: backpack

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: sturdy and comfortable walking shoes
    pair of socks for each day
    cap

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: diamox pills prescribed by your MD (just in case you needed it)

    Photo Equipment: a good camera with lots of memory space because once you get there you`ll be trigger happy

    Miscellaneous: never forget your sunblock

    Was this review helpful?

  • inca trail and other packing info

    by JesEse Written Sep 20, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: 5 things you truly need: a good daypack, comfortable shoes, wicking hiking socks, a fleece jacket and your mental toughness.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Did the Inca trail recently. No matter what people say -- bring a rain jacket &/or poncho, no matter what season it is. Our first day of hiking was sunny & great, then it rained for 2 days. Our guide said that we didn't need ponchos..hhhm.. Should have brought one. Also, you can buy your winter hat/cap, gloves & scarves in peru -- much cheaper & la ighter load for you. Buy them, use them & give them as presents when you go home.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Altitude sickness pills, diarrhea meds, toiletries, etc can be purchased in Peru. Cheaper, don't need prescription -- just ask your local guides what you need.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: You don't have to bring your own sleeping bags and/or mats. Unless you're emotionally attached to yours, you can rent them in cuzco for $12 each. Not too bad if you're going to be traveling peru for weeks, carrying that extra weight is not going to be fun.

    Miscellaneous: Make sure you bring PADLOCKS for your luggage. You will be traveling by bus, train, etc. There have been reports on people going under buses, digging through luggage bags in airports (they stole my ipod charger & a a traveling friend of mine also lost his ipod & battery charger -- these 2 are big in the black market) and etc.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Packing List

    by Popol_Vuh Written Aug 25, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: Back-pack (depending on your size and weigh you will be able to carry more or less stuff, so ask the shop in where you are going to buy it, they could inform you about.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: For the mountains:
    A wind&waterproof jacket (GORE-TEX)
    Climbing shoes (GORE-TEX)
    Coton wear (T-shirts, Sweat-shirts, underwear)
    Two pairs of jeans
    One pair of light trousers
    Anti-sweating socks
    Woolen pull-over
    For the jungle:
    Long socks
    Hair clip or elastics for long-hair girls
    Light clothes and shoes in general but medium high boots are not bad if you are asked to walk among snakes, crocodiles, etc.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Sun glasses (good quality ones)
    Shampoo / conditionner
    Tooth / brush paste
    No soap, but shower gel
    Altitude sickness pills ('soroche' is the word for altitude sickness in Peru as well as in Bolivia)
    Aspirins
    Always bring with you a bottle of water and some chocolates
    Mosquito-repelent cream
    Sun-protector

    Girls, don't forget your pads or tampax !

    Photo Equipment: Batteries and films would be good to have in altitude (many shops have those items but check their validity date).

    Solar filters are not a bad idea as well ...

    Was this review helpful?

  • Inca trail and general packing list

    by JesEse Written Sep 20, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Luggage and bags: 5 things you truly need: a good daypack, comfortable shoes, wicking hiking socks, a fleece jacket and your mental toughness.

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: Did the Inca trail recently. No matter what people say -- bring a rain jacket &/or poncho, no matter what season it is. Our first day of hiking was sunny & great, then it rained for 2 days. Our guide said that we didn't need ponchos..hhhm.. Should have brought one. Also, you can buy your winter hat/cap, gloves & scarves in peru -- much cheaper & la ighter load for you. Buy them, use them & give them as presents when you go home.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Altitude sickness pills, diarrhea meds, toiletries, etc can be purchased in Peru. Cheaper, don't need prescription -- just ask your local guides what you need.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: You don't have to bring your own sleeping bags and/or mats. Unless you're emotionally attached to yours, you can rent them in cuzco for $12 each. Not too bad if you're going to be traveling peru for weeks, carrying that extra weight is not going to be fun.

    Miscellaneous: Make sure you bring PADLOCKS for your luggage. You will be traveling by bus, train, etc. There have been reports on people going under buses, digging through luggage bags in airports (they stole my ipod charger & a a traveling friend of mine also lost his ipod & battery charger -- these 2 are big in the black market) and etc.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • simplesee's Profile Photo

    Sacred Valley and Rainforest

    by simplesee Written Jan 7, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: If going in the low season, Cusco can get rather chilly at night. Had to wear a sweatshirt and some nice wool socks. Also was nice to wear my hiking boots around and some long underwear. Extra bankets at the hotels/hostels are highly recommended. But in the day time, it warms up a bit where you can wear shorts and a t-shirt.

    Toiletries and Medical Supplies: Was fine with bringing just advil, although some people in my group got a little stomach sick. Drink a ton of water to flush your system and you should be good to go. Might want to bring a roll of toilet paper with you as a lot of places (besides where you'll be staying) don't have toilet paper available in the stalls.

    Photo Equipment: Digital cameras is definitely nice to have. All over Peru (Lima, Cusco, Ollantaytambo, and even Puerto Maldonado) there are places where you can download your pictures from your digital camera (no matter what type of memory card you have) onto cd so you can keep on taking those pictures.

    Camping/Beach/Outdoor Gear: If in the rainy season, definitely bring some rain gear, or you could get ponchos pretty cheap out on the streets. A bag cover might be nice to just in case you're hiking around from place to place and you get caught in a down pour. Garbage bags also work pretty well.

    Miscellaneous: If you're going into the rainforest, definitely, bring some mosquito/bug repellant if that stuff bothers you. I kind of like bugs, but sometimes the mosquitos get a little annoying.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • VA_Dave's Profile Photo

    Weather in Peru?

    by VA_Dave Updated Jun 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clothing/Shoes/Weather Gear: To check todays Peru weather
    or the average weather during your travel month:
    http://weather.yahoo.com/regional/PEXX.html

    For instance, august average temperature:

    Lima
    avg high=66.0° F, avg low=60.0° F

    Arequipa
    84.0° F 75.0° F

    Cusco
    67.8° F 35.1° F

    Puno
    No August average available.
    Today: 53° F 28° F
    Figure it is about the same
    in August as Cusco because
    the altitudes are similar.

    In general, figure on 3° F drop for every 1000 ft of
    elevation gain, at night. So if the low in Lima at sea level
    is 60 F, then Cusco is about 10,000 ft higher so
    it is about 30 F colder. Puno is also high altitude.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maillekeul's Profile Photo

    Titicaca : Take some bread - Prenez du pain

    by Maillekeul Written Dec 16, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Miscellaneous: You will bring some things to eat for the family with which you will stay an overnight, but take some bread for you as they won't give you some...

    Vous allez apporter des cadeaux-bouffe pour votre famille d'accueil sur l'ile, mais prenez du pain pour vous, c'est pas du luxe...

    No picture - Pas de photo
    Related to:
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

Peru Hotels

See all 686 Hotels in Peru

Top Peru Hotels

Cusco Hotels
1078 Reviews - 2353 Photos
Lima Hotels
1198 Reviews - 2778 Photos
Machu Picchu Hotels
662 Reviews - 1864 Photos
Iquitos Hotels
136 Reviews - 306 Photos
Aguas Calientes Hotels
24 Reviews - 61 Photos
Huaraz Hotels
106 Reviews - 286 Photos
Cuzco Hotels
213 Reviews - 527 Photos
Puerto Maldonado Hotels
49 Reviews - 197 Photos
Arequipa Hotels
315 Reviews - 746 Photos
Miraflores Hotels
21 Reviews - 46 Photos
Urubamba Hotels
19 Reviews - 94 Photos
Aguas Calientes - Machupicchu Hotels
147 Reviews - 309 Photos
Colca Hotels
105 Reviews - 311 Photos
Chacarilla Hotels
See nearby hotels
San Borja Hotels
See nearby hotels

Instant Answers: Peru

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

124 travelers online now

Comments

Peru What to Pack

Reviews and photos of Peru what to pack posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Peru sightseeing.
Map of Peru