Safety Tips in Caracas

  • Street Crime
    by ericsas
  • State of emergency in Caracas
    State of emergency in Caracas
    by georeiser
  • Some Government Propaganda
    Some Government Propaganda
    by RafaelTheSecond

Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Caracas

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    State of emergency in Caracas

    by georeiser Updated Mar 8, 2009

    A clash between the poorest people in Caracas and the military occured in March 1989. I was there... Many people were killed in Caracas and the country was in a state of emergency with a curfew after 6 PM.

    This incident occured for many years ago, but is an example how fragile a society can be when people feel hopeless.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Adventure Travel
    • Backpacking

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    THE GOVERMENT YES BUT THE PEOPLE NO...

    by RafaelTheSecond Written Apr 29, 2008

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you know what I mean, Chavez is famous for his fight "against" the IMPERIO (means USA) and their "friends" (means Israel, England or anything that says NO to him...now he is not so kind with King Juan Carlos, I do not know why...)

    I was in Venezuela to attend a World Peace Conference, and I was one of the brazilian delagates, this event was supported by the United Nations.

    Specially in the low classes Chavez has BILLIONS OF FANS!!!

    But the working people and most of the middle class society of Caracas knows that you should not trust MR. CHAVEZ that much!!!

    But this is the sort of propaganda that the Establishment use to convince their own people that other Nations are monsters!!!

    It was an outdoor photo gallery in Los Caobos Park...beautiful park by the way!!!

    APRIL 2008

    The picture shows two palestinean chldren crying over the body of their parents!!!

    VIOLENCE IS A SHAME EVERY WHERE BUT WHO ARE THEY TO TALK ABOUT VIOLENCE, HUMAN RIGHTS AND FREEDOM????

    You know what I mean????

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    POST OFFICE DO NOT HAVE BOXES

    by swesn Written Oct 16, 2007

    Note that unlike in some cities where you can carry your stuff in a plastic bag and go to the post office and buy a box from there to pack your stuff in, here in Venezuela, it seems no postal boxes are for sale.

    As such, you have to look for your own box and pack everything in beforehand.

    Yep, I spent the whole morning walking along the streets of Caracas to try and bump a box off someone!!

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    TELEPHONE BOOTHS OFTEN DO NOT WORK

    by swesn Written Oct 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Caracas, there are many telephone 'private and pirate' services. This is because it is very cheap to place phone calls between 2 cell phones if they are both of the same network.

    As such, people set up tables and put up to 3 cell phones (one of each network) and sell their phone services. So, if you need to place a call, you have to tell them the starting digits of the mobile number and the guy at the table will dial from one of his cell phones. You pay by the duration of your call and usually, it is pretty reasonable.

    As such, there is no need at all to buy telephone cards to use at public telephone booths. In fact, often, these telephone booths do not work because these phone service guys have hijacked the telephone lines illegally.

    Anyway, all over the centre of Caracas, you will see such telephone tables set up within 5 metres of one another. They are indeed everywhere.

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    KEEP IN MIND

    by cheesecake17 Updated Mar 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    Caracas, far away from any neighboring countries, is a large city with the normal share of large-city problems; not more and not less. Under normal conditions and with the due precautions (no Rolex, visible gold chains, etc.) you won't have more problems than anywhere else...

    But take precautions.......beaware of......

    Pickpockets concentrate in and around crowded bus and subway stations in downtown Caracas.

    The "barrios" or "ranchitos" (the poor neighborhoods of tin-roofed brick homes that cover the hills around Caracas) and isolated urban parks can be very dangerous.

    There have been incidents of rock throwing from highway overpasses bordering the slum neighborhoods in an attempt to force cars to stop and assess damages. Once stopped, the passengers are robbed by waiting accomplices. In some cases this has led to injuries and death.

    Most criminals are armed with guns or knives and will use force.

    Theft from hotel rooms and safe deposit boxes is increasing, and theft of unattended valuables on the beach and from rental cars parked near isolated areas or on city streets is a common occurrence. A guarded garage or locked trunk is not always a guarantee against theft.

    Subway escalators are a favored site for "bump and rob" petty thefts by roving bands of young criminals, many of whom are well dressed to allay suspicion and to blend in with crowds of workers using the subways during rush hour.

    Armed robberies are common in urban and tourist areas, particularly in Caracas and Maracaibo.

    Criminal violence is on the rise.

    Travelers should exercise caution in displaying money and valuables.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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    Land-slide

    by travelife Written May 18, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Venezuela is country that receives enormous quantity of rain. In 1999, few days of consecutive rainfall caused landslide in this area causing many death among the people living on the hill. But an emergency situation was not called due to election.

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    Homes on the hill

    by travelife Written May 18, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Like most other LAting american cities, low income group peolpe concentrate themselves on the hill where they dont have access to all facilities. Understandably, areas nearby are not safe. But for Caracas, where police are not that honest and efficient, safety is a concern in many parts other than that.

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    EXCHANGE RATE

    by cheesecake17 Written Apr 21, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    There is an Official Exchange Rate, valid among others for credit cards purchases

    Rate today May 02, 2004 - one US$.......Bolivares 1.920

    But.... when you bring US$ in cash you will find a Black Market.

    Black Market value has raised up to bolivares 2.800 per U.S. dollar. - May 02, 2004

    All transsactions with credit cards or ATM machines will be at the official rate of 1917bolivares to 1$..

    Related to:
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    Is SO COLD, that this is ridiculous!!!

    by carolinaEspada Written Jan 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Caracas is the capital of a TROPICAL country... but in December, January and February it can get really cold (during the night and before dawn). What is "really cold" for a regular venezuelan? Way bellow 20 degrees Celcius, way bellow 70 degrees Farenheit. (And Im talking about the city; way up in the mountain, in San José de Galipán, for example, it can be 60s... 50s...). Aaaaand... remember, in Venezuela we dont have heating devices. Room temperature is country temperature... So, if you get cold easily, dont forget to bring a sweater, a jacket, a pair or warm socks, whatever. I've always said that the coldest place I been to is my city of Caracas. I wish we would have some heating device!

    The picture is from: http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.lip.com.ar/MVC-020F.JPG&imgrefurl=http://www.lip.com.ar/indumentaria.htm&h=480&w=640&sz=53&tbnid=zyW7VnsPUBgJ:&tbnh=101&tbnw=134&start=7&prev=/images%3Fq%3D%2522abrigo%2522%2Bpiel%26hl%3Des%26lr%3D%26ie%3DUTF-8

    Related to:
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    • Seniors

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    Airport

    by reobasco Written Nov 14, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This comes from a naturally disobedient "rioplatense". I never ever pay attention to the two hours before international flights. Well, do in Caracas! They ask you to go *three* hours before! And, I just had to go two hours before because, otherwise, I would not have a ride; my friends were very emphatic about being there as early as possible. Well, do it, because the checkups are endless!! I actually lost track of how many security checks I went through. The good part is that everybody was nice and helpful. Beautiful people these Venezuelans, wherever you go.

    More: no air conditioning at the food plaza upstairs. So, light clothes, please.

    Related to:
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    • Theater Travel

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    Ran out of film?

    by carolinaEspada Written Jan 10, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you go to buy more film in a photo store, photo shop, that will be o.k.

    But if you are buying it at the airport or in a tourist souvenirs place or in a drug store, be sure to check the expiring date of the film (it is clearly written somewhere on the box). Some times they are too close to expire or they have already expired.

    Check!

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Singles
    • Family Travel

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    Protection

    by travelife Written May 18, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Its not only about traveler, locals also take precaution about theft and other crimes in local way. The picture shows the planted pieces of glass on the boundary-top as seen from my window!

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    Safety

    by travelife Written May 18, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In a busy street, it would be common to be interrupted by strangers. Ignore them and push them away if necessary before starting a conversation. That’s what I was advised by my hotel.

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See all 55 Hotels in Caracas

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Caracas Warnings and Dangers

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