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Private Tour: Valley of the Nobles and Valley of the Artisans - Deir el-Medina from Luxor
"In the morning your friendly guide and driver will pick you up from your hotel in Luxor by an air-conditioned vehicle to first enjoy a fully guided tour to the Valley of the Nobles. Although very small in size these tombs include some of the most beautiful paintings of the Theban tombs. The preservation of colour remains astounding. Here you will visit the two most beautiful tombs: The Tomb of Nakht and the Tomb of Menna. Second you will visit the Valley of the Workers (Deir el-Medina). This is the place where the workmen of the royal tombs used to live. Here you will see the Temple of Deir el-Medina which was dedicated to the goddess Hathor. This is the only temple in all of Egypt where you can admire carvings of the Final Judgement. At every site you will get information from your Egyptologist tour guide and you will get free time to explore the an transport by air-conditioned vehicle all entrance fees for the mentioned sites
From $68.00
 
West Bank Private Day Tour from Luxor
"Meet your guide who will escort you to the Valley of the Kings you will find the remarkable tombs of Egypt's ancient kings their families and other Egyptian nobility after wards you will head to the Valley of the Queens where wives of Pharaohs were buried in ancient times. The valley is located near the better known Valley of the Kings on the west bank of the Nile across from Thebes (modern Luxor). Have a photo stop at the Colossi of Memnon before you continue to the impressive Hatshepsut Temple dramatically located at the base of colossal cliffs. Wander through the UNESCO World Heritage site at Deir el-Medina where the tomb artisans from the Valley of the Kings lived. Your lunch will be served before you take the way to the hotel."""
From $75.00
 
Private Day Tour to Luxor by Car from Hurghada
"You will meet your guide at your hotel in Hurghada before being transferred by vehicle for 3hours 30minute to Luxor City to start your full day tour. You will start your visit with the Valley of the Kings you will find the remarkable tombs of Egypt's anc their families and other Egyptian nobility. Afterwards you will head to the Valley of the Queens where wives of Pharaohs were buried in ancient times. The valley is located near the better known Valley of the Kings on the west bank of the Nile across from Thebes (modern Luxor). This necropolis is said to hold more than seventy tombs many of which are stylish and lavishly decorated. Then you will head to the Colossi of Memnon for photo stop before you continue to the impressive Hatshepsut Temple dramatically located at the base of colossal cliffs. Wander through the UNESCO World Heritage site at Deir el-Medina where the tomb artisans from the Valley of the Kings lived. Afterwards you will head to the East bank where the breath taking temples of the East Bank Karnak and Luxor temples. After the tour you will return to Hurghada."
From $182.00

Deir el Medina Tips (17)

See where temple builders lived!

It is so weird that this is the first spot I saw in Egypt -- the Deir al-Medina. This is where the monument builders lived-- apparently, the workers and craftsmen led a good life. The layout of the houses can still be seen very clearly - about 70 houses enclosed in a protective wall. This Worker's Village is a great find since some of the walls contain some writings and records from those who used to live here. It must have been a very busy place. There's also a temple near it and it was surprising that I was the only tourist walking around. I even went up the temple roof and got a picture with the Egyptian caretaker, followed by a little tip. Wonderful place to visit and not yet explored as much by the hordes of tourists! A good start to my Egyptian adventure...

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jumpingnorman
Jan 19, 2009

Artisan Temple: Part II

The relief artwork content and style inside the Artisan Temple emphasizes more mystical themes, and less formality than is found in either the Tombs of the Nobles or Royal Tombs. Smoke damage provides evidence that this place was inhabited for a long time after the fall of the Egyptian civilization. In any case, these photos provide additional guidance as to what once will see. The photos were shoot using ASA 50 Velvia without flash, so I had to use the computer to enhance the brightness and sharpness, but basically this is what will be seen. I recommend bringing a camera that can handle lower light conditions. Flash is not a good idea.

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atufft
Apr 07, 2006

Workers Tombs and Temple

The workers that built the great tombs of the Pharaohs lived in a village not far from the Valley of the Kings and Valley of the Queens. Many tombs have been discovered here.
The workers tombs at Deir el-Medineh are well worth a visit. They are not in the same league as the tombs in the Valley of the Kings but they are every bit the equal of the tombs of the nobles. Only a couple are open to visitors and they are very scrict about not allowing any photography - in fact I had to leave my camera outside the tombs. They are painted inside with amazing scenes in vivid colours and are very impressive. Follow the link below for an example of the tombs.
Also on the site is a small Ptolemic temple that is a little way from the tombs but worth a visit. Although small there is a lot of well preserved art visible much of it still painted in the original colours.

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Andrew_W_K
Jul 05, 2009

Artisan Temple: Part I

At the far end of the little valley, just beyond the ruins of the worker homes, there is the Temple for the Artisans. At the time we visited in 1997, it was still being restored. The mud brick ruins shown in places around it are additions by those who inhabited the place in the centuries afterward, but basically, the rectangular structure sits on the edge of a hill. There's an internal stairway the passes various dark rooms, and on the roof there is a nice view across the agricultural plain of the West Bank. The workmanship of the reliefs inside is considerable, which is not surprising since this was the place of worship for the craftsman who lived in Deir al Medina. The artwork reflects the realism of the Ptolemaic period when it was built. Built by Philopator, Philometor, and Euergetes between 221 and 116 BC, it is dedicated to the Gods Hathor and Maat, which are frequently depicted inside. Deir al-Medina, or "monastery of the town" refers to the occupation of the building by early Christian monks.

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atufft
Apr 07, 2006
 
 
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Artisan Village

Deir el-medina is the ruined township that was inhabited by workmen and is now known as the Artisan village.
The village was founded by Tuthmose I and housed the many workers and craftsmen who built and decorated the tombs within the Valley of the Kings. All that is left of the village are the stone wall which mark out the houses and the streets
When they weren’t working, they built and decorated their own tombs and you can visit two of them here. The tombs are small in comparison to those of the pharaohs and can be quite claustrophobic, but it is worth a look at the wall paintings.

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catkin
May 25, 2004

Inherka's Tomb: Part II

These images are ofcourse affected by the flourescent light required to see them. I shot with roll film in those days, and I didn't have a color correcting filter. Oh well, those viewing these images will have to see them for themselves. Television documentaries and this virtualtourist.com site are no substitute for seeing these images for real. Note in this collection the image of the fellow with the jaguar pelt and trained doves. Inherka's tomb was fully finished from wall to ceiling before he died, and it seems that his wife was very powerful. She is frequently pictured in same size as him. No word on whether or not she was also an artist, but the delicate nature of the work suggests that she influenced his outlook on life very much. There's no battle scenes or Ramses punishing his enemies scenes down here.

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atufft
Apr 07, 2006

Deir El Medina - the Village of the tomb workers

Of course someone had to build the last home (the tombs) of the Pharao and the people who did so were not slaves as some thought but normal workers.

They lived with their families in a Valley close to the Valley of the kings. Their houses built from dried mud brick can still be seen today (see picture).
Because they left us a lot of "evidence" in the form of painted pottery shards we know a lot about the lives of the workers. They had to work 8 days in a row, in that time they camped close to the tomb, then they had 2 days free with their families. Because they could not grow their own food here, they had to rely on the monthly food supply from the Pharao.

They also made their own tombs - smaller ones, but with fabulous colors, that you can visit here.
Unfortunately you can not take any pictures, this would kill the colors - but really they look like fresh painted.

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Myndo
Dec 05, 2004

Sennedjem's Tomb (#1)

Sennedjen's one room tomb represents a high point in terms of color not only for Dier al Medina, but for all the West Bank, and for that matter all Egypt. The tombs of the servants and respected overseers of the tomb construction were not filled with so much gold and nobility, and so were for the most part ignored by looters and early archeologists. The inner tomb walls appear to be frescoes of sort, or maybe painted, but in any case these are not basreliefs. The artwork emphasizes themes from the Book of the Dead from the perspective of a commoner rather than royalty, and so vivid color landscapes of workers plowing fields and of families are important content here. Photography of these tombs is difficult due to the dirty plexiglass put up to protect the works from tourist hands. Also, flourscent lighting turns my images a greenish hue, as I didn't have a color correction filter on my roll film camera at the time. Note the curved ceiling of the inner tomb and the rough cut entrance stairwell. Sennedjem was a 19th dynasty servant.

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atufft
Apr 07, 2006
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Shofja

"We are going to Luxor...."
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clairegeordio

"One week in Luxor"
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atufft

"Two-Thirds of Egypt's Ruins are Here"
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Jeca011

"L U X O R"
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sachara

"Luxor"
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Inherka's Tomb: Part I

Like Sennedjen's tomb, Inherka's tomb is filled with colorful life-like scenes. The emphasis here seems more on family and entertainment. The touching family portrait with Inherka's daughters is particularly inspiring in this respect. The artisans had wealth--finely woven linen fabric clothes, wigs, and private musical entertainment. Inherka and his wife were not only affected by the gods, but also by the natural world that surrounded them. Birds and animals are part of the artwork in this tomb.

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atufft
Apr 07, 2006

Deir el-Medina village & tombs

The community at Deir el-Medina consisted once of the workers and craftsmen employed in the construction of the tombs of the King's Valley. There are a couple of tombs & house traces, very interesting to see the life & rituals of the people serving there...

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Oana_bic
Feb 16, 2004

Valley of the Artisans

Deir el-Medina as it is known is where the workers from the royal tombs lived. There is the ruins of the village where they lived and some small tombs here. But if possible when visiting the West Bank fit in a visit to here because the decorations inside on e of the tombs are absolutely fantastic and clear.

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pmarshuk
May 25, 2003

Deir el-Medina & Workmen's Village

Deir el-Medina & Workmen's Village are open free of charge. This place has two interesting tombs with stunning decorated chambers. (Tombs no. 359 and NO.1). Worth visiting. Admission ticket for both tombs is 20 EGP (May 2006) . You can only puchase at the central ticket office near the Colossi of Memnon.

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Sambawalk
May 28, 2006

Things to Do Near Deir el Medina

Things to Do

Luxor Temple

One of the smaller Temples, it only takes about an hour to walk through here. It's located in the center of town It has been determined that the Luxor temple holds great significance to the Opet...
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Things to Do

Karnak Temple

One famous aspect of Karnak is the Hypostyle Hall in the Precinct of Amun-Re, a hall area of 50,000 sq ft (5,000 m2) with 134 massive columns arranged in 16 rows. 122 of these columns are 10 meters...
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Things to Do

Temple of Hatshepsut

Located beneath massive cliffs near the west bank of the Nile, the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, also known as Deir el Bahri, is dedicated to Amon-Ra, the sun god. Hatshepsut, meaning 'foremost...
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Things to Do

Valley of the Kings

This is the pharaoh's were buried in hopes they would return to their Gods in the afterlife. King Tutankhamen tomb was found here in the 1920's almost untouched. We had gone early in the...
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Things to Do

Colossi of Memnon

These two statues once stood at the entrance gate of the mortuary temple of Amenhotep III, though very little of the temple behind them remains today. They were carved from two massive granite blocks,...
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Things to Do

The Souks or Market

the sights, the sounds, the smell, the haggling among buyers and seller...you'll be right in the front row seat watching all these happenings when you get to the inner portion of the market. go...go...
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