Valley of the Kings, Luxor

4.5 out of 5 stars 132 Reviews

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    KV 2 - Tomb of Ramses IV

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 15, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This tomb was spared flood-water damage and paintings are very well preserved.


    Rameses IV, 1151-1145 B.C.

    Rameses IV, the son of Rameses III, ascended to the throne during a period when Egypt had fallen on hard times. There is no evidence that he attempted, or was able, to restore its wealth and international authority. Texts of his reign speak of social unrest, rising crime, and economic decline.

    However, Rameses IV did order extensive work in several stone and turquoise quarries, and he built additions to temples at Abydos, Heliopolis, and Thebes and erected many statues there. His own memorial temple lay near Dayr al Madinah, and his tomb, KV 2, was dug in the Valley of the Kings. Later, in Dynasty 21, his body was moved with several other royal mummies to KV 35 for safekeeping.

    Tomb of Ramses IV
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    KV 8 - Tomb of Merenptah

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 15, 2004

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    This tomb is damaged but you can still see great paintings.


    Merenptah, 1212-1202 B.C.

    Because Rameses II lived into his eighties at a time when normal life expectancy in Egypt was only about forty, many of his sons predeceased him, and it was his thirteenth son, Merenptah, who finally succeeded him to the throne. Merenptah was by then already sixty, and his reign lasted only ten years. But during that time, he maintained peace in northeast Africa and western Asia, led expeditions into Nubia and Libya, and sent food to famine-stricken Hittites in Syria. His military exploits are recounted in three major inscriptions, one at Karnak, a second at Athribis in the Delta, and a third in his memorial temple at Thebes. This last text includes the first known reference to the people of Israel, which was said to be "wasted, bare of seed."

    Merenptah’s building activities included additions to the Osireion at Abydos, enlarging government offices at Memphis (and moving his administration from Piramesse to Memphis), and building at Dandarah. In the Valley of the Kings, his tomb, KV 8, is one of the valley’s largest. His memorial temple, currently being made into an open-air museum by the Swiss Institute, lay immediately behind that of Amenhetep III and used the earlier temple as a source of building stone.

    Merenptah’s mummy was found in 1898 in the royal cache of mummies re-buried in KV 35, the tomb of Amenhetep II.

    Tomb of Merenptah
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    Look up

    by uglyscot Updated May 1, 2006

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    When visiting tombs, don't forget to look up as even the ceilings can be decorated . From the earliest times [eg IVthe Dynasty] ceilings were often painted blue or black with 5 pointed yellow stars. In later times an actual zodiac was found. In this tomb there is an astronomical ceiling in the middle corridor.

    In the photo taken in the tomb of Ramses IX, the god Bes [ the only god represented full face] sits above a lintel. Other gods and goddesses walk above him.

    Address: Valley of the Kings

    Directions: just past the entrance to the main valley, on eastern side.

    ceiling from Ramses IX tomb ceiling detail the god Knum
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    Tomb of Ramses IX

    by uglyscot Updated May 1, 2006

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    This is a large tomb with excellent paintings. It is usually crowded, so that photography was difficult, and the paintings are protected by glass or plastic. Nowadays photography is forbidden in all tombs.
    The long straight corridor is typical of the tombs from the late Ramesside period.

    The main photo shows the scarab in a solar barque between two uadjet eyes, sailing on the snake representing Time.

    Address: Valley of the Kings

    Directions: This tomb is near the entrance to the valley on the left hand side.

    scarab and snake from Ramses IX bull-headed figures snakes and mourners crocodile in a boat solar barque of Ra
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    Valley of the Kings

    by sachara Updated Aug 22, 2003

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    For visiting the Valley of the Kings you need some time. So cross the Nile to the westbank and start your visit in the Valley of the Kings. Fore some of the 20 tombs you have to wait a long time before you can enter. Tickets for the tombs (on every ticket you can visit 3 tombs) you have to buy at the ticketoffice, several KMs away at the other side of the necropolis. Only the separate ticket for the tomb of Tutankhamun you can buy at the entrance of the Valley of the Kings.
    We visited the tomb of Tutankhamun. It was not the most impressive tomb to visit, but the discovery of this tomb in 1922 was a very important and exciting historical event in the archaeology. They found the tomb at the bottom of the tomb of Ramses VI.
    We visited also some other tombs. All the tombs have a similar design. Staircases and long corridors lead to the ''underworld'' of a sery of chambers and halls ending in the burial chamber. The paintings are beautifull, we bought a nice booklet of it.

    Directions: The Valley of the Kings is situated rather isolated at the nothern end of the necropolis.
    The road is climbing and it can be rather hot. So be prepared if you go by bike or choose other transportation.

    Nile crossing to the Westbank
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    KV 17 - Tomb of Seti I

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 15, 2004

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    This tomb is the most preserved tomb in the valley. It descends over 100m. The long corridor ends with the burial chamber. The burial chamber originally contained Seti’s alabaster sarcophagus, but that is now in the Soane Museum in London.


    Sety I, 1291-1278 B.C.

    Sety I may have briefly served as co-regent with his father, Rameses I, and then ruled Egypt alone for fourteen years.

    Sety I called himself “Repeater of Births,” meaning that he considered himself the leader of a renaissance. Certainly, this was true not only militarily but in terms of Egypt’s art and architecture as well. For example, he devoted considerable time and energy to the Temple of Amen at Karnak. He began the great hypostyle hall, one of the largest religious structures ever built. The hall covers 5,406 square meters (1.3 acres) and contains 134 columns, the largest of them twenty-three meters (seventy-five feet) high.

    Sety also built extensively at Abydos, where he built both the Osireion, a cenotaph dedicated to Osiris, and an elegantly proportioned temple in which a “King List” was carved. That list gives the names of seventy-six rulers from the beginning of Dynasty 1 to Sety I himself.

    Sety I’s mummy, found in the Dayr al Bahri cache in 1881, is now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo.

    Sety I and his principal wife Tuya lost their firstborn son. It was their second son, Rameses II, who succeeded his father as pharaoh.

    Tomb of Seti I
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    Valley Of The Kings

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 15, 2004

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    The Valley of the Kings is located on the West Bank of the River Nile. Some people think that the reason the New Kingdom pharaohs decided to build their tombs here was because of the pyramid-shaped mountain located here. The pyramids of the old kingdom were like beacons for grave robbers, so the New Kingdom tombs could still be under a pyramid, but as well be hidden away in the side of a rocky hill.

    Valley of the kings
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    Our Theban Highlight: Rameses VI tomb

    by MikeBird Updated May 23, 2010

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    Your entrance ticket to the Valley of the Kings entitles each person to enter 3 tombs on any one day. You have to pay extra if you want to visit the tomb of Tutankhamun or Rameses VI. We chose the latter because we'd heard that Tutankhamun's tomb is quite small and only famous because of it's association with the boy king.

    We were really impressed with Rameses VI tomb and felt that it was well worth the additional LE£50 each ( half for my daughter).

    Firstly the tomb wasn't crowded so it wasn't hot and we could take our time slowly looking at all the paintings and even noticing some of the old greek graffiti high up near the entrance.

    As you go further down there are small side chambers with paintings depicting daily life but the real excitement comes at the end. There is a very large chamber with a smashed sarcophagus but it is the amazing paintings of night and day depicted up the walls and onto the ceiling that really impressed us. The dark blue and the golden stars of the night sky separated by the long, thin figures was just gorgeous.

    The pictures of the headless slaves in the corners and columns were however a reminder of how brutal these times were despite all the care, detail and imagination put into creating these wonderful wall paintings.

    For us, this tomb was the highlight of our visit to the fantastic Valley of the Kings.

    Explanatory sign at tomb entrance
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    Tomb of Ramses III

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    Ramses III ruled for 31 years. His tomb consists of four corridors that open out into a double vestibule followed by the burial chamber. It is decorated beautifully. The lights went out for several minutes when we were in there, but luckily we were not too far from the entrance when it happened!

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    Tomb of Seti II

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    It was Howard Carter who cleared most of the tomb between 1903 and 1904.
    The history of the tomb is really unknown at this time. It is very likely that Seti II may have originally been buried with his wife, Tausret, in her tomb and later moved to this tomb.

    The tomb consists of a short entryway corridor followed by three long corridors followed by a well room.

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    Tomb of Ramses VI (KV 9)

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    In the second year of Ramses VI rule, his brother, Ramses V was buried here, and Ramses VI enlarged and decorated his brother’s tomb, where he was also buried six years later. This tomb is quite long, with a succession of corridors leading to the burial chamber. This tomb has one of most complex and sophisticated decorations of all of the tombs in the Valley of the Kings

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    Religious images at Medinat Habu

    by uglyscot Updated Nov 26, 2012

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    Like all temples and monuments in Ancient Egypt, the walls are decorated with representations of the gods, usually taking part in the cermonies at the death of the pharaoh, or being offered gifts by the pharaoh.
    The different gods can be recognised by their head-dresses or animal heads,:
    Amun has 2 tall feathers on his head, Osiris is appears as a mummy with the tall helmet with plumes on either side, Isis has a throne head-dress, Maat has the feather of justice, Ptah looks like a mummy but with no head-dress, Thoth has a strange anteater like head, Anubis is a jackal, Horus has a hawk head, Hathor is represented as a cow or cow-headed woman, Bes is a dwarf-like god always shown full face, Bast /Bastet is a catheaded goddess.
    Other things to look for are the false doors where the dead were believed to come from in order that they could eat the sacrifices .

    Address: Valley of the Kings. Luxor West Bank

    Isis, Horus and Hathor A false door protective wings on a lintel entrance to a side chapel above and below
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    The Stable Rock Outcrop of the Valley

    by atufft Written Apr 11, 2006

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    The Valley of the Kings is located in a rather remarkably stable rock formation that is also not impossible to tunnel into. The towering formations are themselves of some interest, and so I've included a few images here. It's important to arrive either in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the bus loads of tourists that crowd into the valley. There are however some tombs that are left off the tour guide itinerary that can be rather pleasant in their isolation. There is also a trail that leads over the hill to the Temple of Hatshepsut. The American University in Cairo's Theban Mapping Project is a good website for an overview of the Valley of the Kings, and so a link is provided below.

    Website: http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/atlas/transcript.html

    Valley of the Kings Rock Outcrop Main Entrance to Valley of the Kings Entrance to Unknown Tomb Rock Outcrop at Valley of the Kings
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    KV 11 - Tomb of Ramses III

    by Jeca011 Updated Jun 15, 2004

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    The colour of painted sunk reliefs is well preserved.


    Rameses III, 1182-1151 B.C.

    Immediately after his father Setnakht died, Rameses III began a reign dedicated to slavishly copying the deeds of Rameses II. Obviously, Rameses III greatly admired almost everything about the reign of Rameses II. He adopted a similar titulary, gave his children the same names that Rameses II had given his, and modeled his memorial temple, Madinat Habu, on the Ramesseum. Rameses III was an ambitious builder, and erected or added to scores of temples in Nubia, Egypt, and even western Asia.

    Rameses III buried the several children and wives who predeceased him in the Valley of the Queens. He himself was buried in KV 11, a tomb that had been begun by his father before he moved to KV 14.

    The remarkably well-preserved mummy of Rameses III was found in 1881 in the Dayr al Bahri cache.

    Tomb of Ramses III
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    The Valley of Kings

    by Luchonda Updated Jun 2, 2005

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    A must see : Luxor westbank "the Valley of Kings".
    The Valley of the Kings contains approximately sixty-two excavated tombs
    of which the most famous one is the thomb of Toet - No 62 (Attention - extra fee to pay)
    But inside - it is rather empty -you have to visit
    the National Museum in Cairo to explore the richness of his tomb.
    So is this a tourist trap or not ?!

    Directions: Westbank of Luxor

    Entrance warning

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