Map &
Directions

Hours
mode_edit
Been here?
Rate it
chevron_left
 
chevron_right

Top Tours

 
3-Day Private Trip to the Draa Valley from Marrakech
"Day 1: Marrakech – Aït benhaddou - Oasis Fint (D)At approximately 8:00am your driver will pick you up at your hotel or on the nearest parking area if you are in a riad. Depart from Marrakech by the Tizi N’Tichka pass and Berber villages on the side of the mountain. The driver will make various stops so you may attain beautifu for a visit to the Kasbah which dates back to the 11th century and is classified as a UNESCO world heritage site. Proceed to Ouarzazate then directly to Oasis Fint a lost magnificent greenery case in the middle of nowhere. Walk alone into the Oasis if you like as the driver gives you general information about it. Head to your guesthouse where you will enjoy a late dinner. Overnight: Oasis Flint guesthouse ) Depart towards the Tizi Tiniffift pass comprised of lunar landscapes and head in the direction of Agdz. Visit Tamnougalt Kasbah and the palm grove alone. Continue along Draa valley in edge of Oued
From EUR154.00
 
Private Day Trip: Imlil Village and Kik Plateau with Lunch from Marrakech
"Your driver will meet you at your hotel at 9:00am. Leaving Marrakech in a private vehicle head through the small winding roads that go in between the rocks and steep gorges at the front end of Asni. A famous place of rendezvous for villagers throughout the region famous for its souk on Saturday. Stop for a visit by yourself at the market and the famous parking lot meeting with your local guide for a walk around to the Kasbah the waterfalls and back by a village perched on the heights of Imlil. Next have a traditional Berber meal in a family home. After lunch return to the vehicle and back with your driver to Asni road then the kik plateau where stunning valleys can be seen. There will be time for a stop at Lake Takerkoust before returning to your hotel around 5:00pm. The mountain walk does not presen
From EUR43.00
 
Private Day Trip: Zat Valley and Pottery Village from Marrakech
"Your driver will pick you up from your hotel at 9:00am and depart from Marrakech. The first stop will be at the village Tighdouine and if you are there on Wednesday feel free to stop in for the local souk. Then from Tighedouine you will go on foot by yourself on the mule path towards Talatast a small village on top of a hill known for its handcrafted pottery.Seeing the potters at work is an interesting sight and is a look into the craftsmanship of the village. Continue hiking along the Oued to one of the natural sources of sparkling w you will head back to Tighdouine to ride back to Marrakech for an around 4:00pm arrival."""
From EUR20.00

Street Vendors Tips (52)

spoilt for choice - take your pick: Eat where the action is at Djma elFna

Ive eaten amongst the stalls several times and not had any side effects nor heard of any - despite my Moroccan acquaintances refusals to eat there choosing nearby also budget appealing Cafe Toubkal - but thats another tip story!

As for the stalls here in the main square - its all part of the action and fun of experiencing being in the centre of Marrakech - these stalls/outdoor restaurants start getting busy from about 5pm through till about 1130 pm - unless its Ramadan and the place can be busier till much later.

Ive heard of recommendations vying to stall Number 1 - which i have tried a couple of times - i dont really think it makes a lot of difference - you can roam around and look for a stall that catches your eye for selection, price and menu. Each stall tends to have piles of fresh looking and colourfully appealing meats and vegetables waiting to be cooked for your dinner!

Ive usually had the fried aubergine (repeat portions at times as i love aubergine and though sometimes its done over oily its pretty good!) with brochettes. ie cubed meat cooked on skewers or sticks.
Be mindful that if they place bread and condiments at your table
setting such as olives and sauces and so on they come with a charge as well.

Ive generally had no problems eating salads at restaurants around Morocco - especially the regular menu items Salade Nicoise or Salade Morocaine which are delicious salads - Ive generally tended to stay away from uncooked veges here in this environment. (though i do frequently drink the freshly squeezed orange juice but its always with question in the back of my head whether this is the time that i end up with ........)

Favorite Dish Fried aubergine, beef brochettes.

angiebabe's Profile Photo
angiebabe
Oct 14, 2007

Djemaa el Fna food stalls: outdoors

There are many food stalls in Djemaa el Fna, and every visitor should try to eat there at least once. It is part of the Marrakech experience. The food is cheap - usually DH30 for a main dish, such as tajine or couscous- but not especially good. The vendors tend to use the cheapest possible ingredients and as little meat as possible. I had a pastilla (pigeon pie) here, which had no more than a teaspoonful of pigeon in it. It was nearly all pastry. Nevertheless it was a fun place to sit.

iwys's Profile Photo
iwys
May 05, 2007

Local Cuisine: Food stalls in Djemaa El Fna

The food is delicious at the food stalls. Just make sure you got wet tissues with you to clean silverware :).
Also, My Husband and I had a "sandwich" (i.e. meat skewers in flat Moroccon bread) in a local hole-in-the-wall place juts near the huge Centre Artisanal on Rue de la Kasbah and it was delicious. But make sure you agree on the price before ordering.

ugt's Profile Photo
ugt
May 03, 2007

Food stalls: In the square

At some point you will eat dinner in the middle of the Jemma El Fna, there you'll find the food stalls - big push carts with picnic tables around them. My impression was that this the local version of fast food, there are alot of different carts but most seemed to have the same stuff, ours was "OK" but no big deal.

mrotsmit's Profile Photo
mrotsmit
Apr 29, 2007
 
 
Sponsored Listings

Hotels Near Marrakesh

Hotels
Circuit de la Palmeraie , Boite Postale 1488, Marrakech, Morocco
Show Prices
Hotels
1, Derb Assehbe - Bab Doukkala, Marrakech, 40000, Morocco
Show Prices
Hotels
10 bis Derb Chérif, Marrakech, 40000, Morocco
Show Prices
Hotels
Route Fes, km 6, Marrakech, 80000, Morocco
Show Prices
Hotels
Derb Alaati Allah, 14, Hay Salam, Medina, Marrakech, 40 000, Morocco
Show Prices
Hotels
44, derb chourafa ex derb draoua, sidi ben slimane, Marrakech Medina, 40000
Show Prices

Stall #93: Chez Bienvenue: More cheap food on Djemaa El Fna

When in Marrakech, eating at the food stalls on Djemaa El Fna square is an absolute must!

Hundreds of stalls set up in the square each evening, offering a selection of tasty meals at ridiculously cheap prices. Competition is fierce and each stall will try to entice you to eat there with promises of the best food in town! The touts have clearly been working on their sales pitch - I was met with shouts of "Marks and Spencers quality food", "our food is sound as a pound/lovely jubbly" and "cheaper than Asda prices".

In truth, I was a little apprehensive about eating food from street vendors. Each stall displays its raw meat out in the open, with flies buzzing around. So, the first time I ventured down to Djemaa El Fna I decided I'd just eat my meal....and then see if I was ill the next morning! I'm happy to report that I ate at the food stalls at Djemaa El Fna on several occasions and never suffered any illness at all.

On my final night in Marrakech, during a visit to the city in February 2007, I ate at #93: Chez Bienvenue (each stall has a unique number and name).

Similar to the stalls that I had eaten at earlier on in my stay, the food on offer here consisted of whole chickens, beef, lamb and chicken kebabs, meat steaks, merguez sausages, shrimps, calamari, French fries, couscous, eggplant and salads. The set up was identical to that of countless other stalls on the square, with dozens of diners sat shoulder to shoulder on benches around the stall.

I sat next to two brothers from Birmingham, one of whom had just finished eating a plate of sheep brains prior to my arrival.

Favorite Dish The hygienic standards at the food stalls in the Djemaa El Fna always looked a bit questionable to me. This was highlighted during the course of my meal at Chez Bienvenue, when a large pile of mince meat fell from the stall onto the concrete below. The owner picked it up and dusted it down, while the tourists looked knowingly at each other as to what he was about to do with it. Sure enough, the meat was placed back on the stall awaiting its consumption by an unsuspecting customer!

My meal at Chez Bienvenue consisted of:

- The ubiquitous complimentary piece of round bread and a plate of diced tomatoes and onions;

- Fried shrimps: a large plate of tasty shrimps served with a slice of lemon;

- Chicken kebabs: 6 skewers of tender, well cooked chicken

- A bottle of Coca Cola;

- A glass of sweet mint tea.

The total cost of my meal was just 75 Dhs (approx. 4.50 GBP).

As I've said in my other tips about the various food stalls at Djemaa El Fna, eating at these no frills stalls and mingling with the locals is probably my overriding memory of my stay in Marrakech and the best way to experience the city and its people!

Cheap, tasty shrimps and kebabs in an amazing setting! Highly recommended!!

SWFC_Fan's Profile Photo
SWFC_Fan
Mar 04, 2007

Stall #42: Rachida: Fried shrimps on Djemaa El Fna

When in Marrakech, eating at the food stalls on Djemaa El Fna square is an absolute must!

Hundreds of stalls set up in the square each evening, offering a selection of tasty meals at ridiculously cheap prices. Competition is fierce and each stall will try to entice you to eat there with promises of the best food in town! The touts have clearly been working on their sales pitch - I was met with shouts of "Marks and Spencers quality food", "our food is sound as a pound/lovely jubbly" and "cheaper than Asda prices".

In truth, I was a little apprehensive about eating food from street vendors. Each stall displays its raw meat out in the open, with flies buzzing around. So, the first time I ventured down to Djemaa El Fna I decided I'd just eat my meal....and then see if I was ill the next morning! I'm happy to report that I ate at the food stalls at Djemaa El Fna on several occasions and never suffered any illness at all.

One of the stalls that I visited during my trip in February 2007 was #42: Rachida (each stall has its own number and name).

On this occasion I was beckoned in by the waiter who insisted on showing me the range of food available at Rachida. He took me by the hand and led me along a line of raw meat (sausages, whole chickens, lamb and beef kebabs), fish, shrimps, calamari, couscous, eggplant and plates of salad. I told him that I'd have a look around and come back later, but he offered me a complimentary glass of mint tea (or "Moroccan Whisky" as he referred to it!) while I studied the menu - and I relented and agreed to eat there.

I took a seat on one of the empty benches (quite a rarity at Djemaa El Fna where you usually have to battle for elbow room with neighbouring diners!) and received my glass of mint tea along with a paper place mat, a piece of round bread and a tomato dip.

Favorite Dish I ordered a plate of fried shrimps and a bottle of Fanta orange. After a few minutes, I received a plate half filled with fried shrimps...and half filled with calamari. I picked at the calmari, but ate very little of it. The shrimps, on the other hand, were very tasty and I soon emptied that half of my plate. The waiter saw that I wasn't eating the calamari and apologised for assuming that I wanted it. He then ordered one of the cooks to serve me another handful of shrimps, which arrived a few minutes later.

After polishing off my additional shrimps, Rachid brought me another glass of mint tea. I sat back and watched the spectacle around me - hundreds of food stalls selling cheap, tasty food, thousands of people (locals and tourists alike) mingling, the sound of drums being played and the smell of meat being cooked. Eating at the food stalls of Djemaa El Fna really is one of the things that you must do to *experience* Marrakech!

The total cost of my meal (shrimps, calamari, bread, tomato dip, bottle of Fanta orange and 2 glasses of refreshing mint tea) was just 40 Dhs (approx. 2.50 GBP)!!

Eating at the food stalls of Djemaa El Fna is one of the best ways to really experience Marrakech and to meet its people! Many of the food stalls offer similar food, but each has its own character - be sure to drop by #42 Rachida to try the delicious fried shrimps! Highly recommended!!

SWFC_Fan's Profile Photo
SWFC_Fan
Mar 03, 2007

Stall #81: Chez Abdessalam: Kebabs at Djemaa El Fna

When in Marrakech, eating at the food stalls on Djemaa El Fna square is an absolute must!

Hundreds of stalls set up in the square each evening, offering a selection of tasty meals at ridiculously cheap prices. Competition is fierce and each stall will try to entice you to eat there with promises of the best food in town! The touts have clearly been working on their sales pitch - I was met with shouts of "Marks and Spencers quality food", "our food is sound as a pound/lovely jubbly" and "cheaper than Asda prices".

In truth, I was a little apprehensive about eating food from street vendors. Each stall displays its raw meat out in the open, with flies buzzing around. So, the first time I ventured down to Djemaa El Fna I decided I'd just eat my meal....and then see if I was ill the next morning! I'm happy to report that I ate at the food stalls at Djemaa El Fna on several occasions and never suffered any illness at all.

The first stall that attracted my custom was #81 Chez Abdessalam (each stall has a number and a name). I took a seat at one of the benches, shoulder to shoulder with other diners (eating at Djemaa El Fna is not for the claustrophobic!), and received a complimentary bread roll, a tomato dip and a paper place mat. The guidebooks recommend that you use your bread as an alternative to cutlery as most people who fall sick from eating at the stalls do so because of utentils that are rinsed and reused.

The menu at Chez Abdessalam includes soups, salad, fish, mixed seafood, sausages, couscous, eggplant, lamb, chicken and beef kebabs.

Favorite Dish My meal at Chez Abdessalam was as follows:

- Complimentary bread (a round piece of bread, ideal for soaking up sauces and dips). This was standard at all the stalls I visited;

- A tomato based dip with a hint of aniseed to it;

- A plate of olives;

- A plate of French fries. Very nice - thin and salty;

- Mixed kebabs: 6 kebabs on long skewers (2 each with chicken, beef and lamb - with red and green peppers and onions), 3 small sausages (of unknown meat, but very well cooked!) and a piece of lamb. All the meat was extremely well cooked and for the most part was good quality. The chicken kebabs were nicer than the beef or lamb ones, but all were pretty good!

- A glass of freshly squeezed orange juice. Ice cold and very refreshing.

- A complimentary glass of mint tea, served with the mint leaf still in the glass. Very tasty and surprisingly refreshing!

The total cost of my meal was just 50 Dhs (approx. 3 GBP).

Superb value food and a unique atmosphere! Eating at the food stalls of Djemaa El Fna is an absolute must! You could do worse than #81: Chez Abdessalam! Highly recommended!!

SWFC_Fan's Profile Photo
SWFC_Fan
Mar 03, 2007

Dinner in Djemaa el-Fna: Dinner in Djemaa el-Fna

One of the highlights of my time in Marrakech was eating dinner in Djemaa el-Fna (the main square). Every evening around dusk the square starts to fill up with stall after stall of food vendors. It is quite a scene as the light fades and the smoke starts to rise up from the giant cauldrons of boiling oil that is used to cook much of the food on offer.

All of the stalls are numbered, and some are obviously focused towards tourists with menus in English and spruikers trying to get you to take a seat. These stalls tend to sell a large range of food, with it all out on display for you to see. Other stalls are packed with locals, and there is no menu - just a limited selection to choose from.

Usually I am dubious about eating at 'street stalls', assuming that I will get sick from whatever I eat. However, I had only read positive things about eating in Djemaa el-Fna so was keen to give it a try.

Alison and I took a wander past all of the food stalls, checking out what was on offer and which places looked too touristy for our liking. We decided to be a little adventurous and eat at Stall number 14, which seemed to only be frequented by locals. We were squeezed onto a small bench, sitting opposite (and very close) to some locals who looked at us a little strangely at first.

Favorite Dish A hunk of bread was placed in front of us on a sheet of paper, then a small plate of mashed up roasted tomato and another plate of mashed deep-fried eggplant/aubergine. We used pieces of bread to eat, as there is no cutlery available (and it would be too dirty to want to use anyway!). The eggplant was absolutely delicious - the best thing I ate on our trip. We also ate some fried fish and some really delicious chips. When you finish eating they will give you a piece of paper to wipe your hands on.

We enjoyed the meal so much that we returned again the next night. We ate pretty much the same thing, as that was all Stall 14 had on offer, just a different type of fish this time. Each meal came to only about the equivalent of £5 pounds for two people.

It was a fabulous experience!

sue_stone's Profile Photo
sue_stone
Feb 15, 2007

Top 5 Marrakesh Writers

suvanki's Profile Photo

suvanki

"Winter and Summer in Marrakesh"
View Member
angiebabe's Profile Photo

angiebabe

"Magical Marrakech"
View Member
sue_stone's Profile Photo

sue_stone

"Marrakech - Incredible but exhausting!"
View Member
toonsarah's Profile Photo

toonsarah

"Two times in Marrakech"
View Member
johnsakura's Profile Photo

johnsakura

"Red City of Marrakech"
View Member
 
 

Street Vendors: Dinner at Djemaa el Fna

When the night falls, all the story-tellers, acrobats and snake charmers disappear from Djema el Fnaa and give way to the food stalls which will soon fill the air swith smoke and grilled meat and spices scents.

Favorite Dish If you do not feel confident about your stomach being resistant to the street food in Marrakesh (which is the case for many Westerners), the best option is to watch the scene from one of the many cafe terraces that overlook the square while sipping a thé à la menthe.

DanielF's Profile Photo
DanielF
Aug 24, 2006

Street Vendors: Good shop for a quick snack

There's a small shop that sells chiche kebab and small individual tagines (see pix) near the Riad des Arts, which was quite OK for a snack. I think it was 5 dinars for whatever (one stick of chiche kebab, or one tagine, with bread and tomato "salsa" type salad on the side), I have no idea whether this is normal or tourist price. Nothing great and not shining clean, but fresh and safe and the people although not wreathed in smiles are OK. If you're staying in the neighborhood in a Riad, it's a nice change from either the bad and expensive terrace restaurants of Djama El Fna or the food in the Riads. Practically only local people eat there (rather uncomfortable, perched on narrow high chairs at a counter) and tourists usually seem to buy chiche kebab sandwiches. It's better to eat there though and get a tagine.

chihiro75
May 20, 2006

Food stalls: Where Marrakesh comes to life by night

If you want to eat cheap, authentic, and beneath the stars, the food stalls are the way to go. However, how you decide on which one to partake of is up to you, there are SO MANY and they're all oh so friendly as they try and persuade you to have a seat at their little eatery. We chose one that was extremely crowded as we assumed this was a good sign.

They squeezed us in on one of the long, skinny tables with bench seating between two other dining parties. Then asked us what we'd like in French, and when I say they, I mean multiple people, all surrounding us apparently dying to take our order. ;-) Unfortunately my vision is not as good as I'd like and I was having a difficult time reading the posted menu, perhaps the delicious smoke pouring forth from the grills added to my inability. I simply said "poulet, poisson, legumes, salade?" And within SECONDS they were bringing us a thousand little dishes of Moroccan salads, couscous, bread, dips for the bread, etc. etc. And shortly thereafter that, skewers of chicken and fish and beef (for Tim). The food just kept coming.

The people sitting next to us finished eating and we watched them negotiate their bill (yes, bargaining here too) and then a nice lone French guy sat in their place and we watched him get greeted/affronted by a swarm of waiters. ;-)

It was A LOT of fun, chaos and good food in the most unique atmosphere ever. Kind of felt like a picnic with a bunch of strangers.

Favorite Dish I love love love all the little salads and bread and dips they give you!

sunlovey's Profile Photo
sunlovey
May 15, 2006

Djemma el Fna: its been said a thousand times...

...but it is still true: the Djemma is the best place to eat.
With the coming of dusk the square is populated by a fresh sea of faces as countless cooking fires start and throw their smoke to the sky. For less than a fiver a head you can eat well and people watch at your leisure.
One word of warning: it is better to eat early in the evening as a lack of running water means that glasses and cutlery are washed in the same water all evening.

lucyt
Mar 02, 2006

Things to Do Near Marrakesh

Things to Do

Ensemble Artisanal

In the Ensemble Artisanal there are carpet weavers, musical instrument makers, leather workers, wood workers and many more crafts people. The centre has government controlled prices, and although not...
View More
Things to Do

Jardin Majorelle

The Jardin Majorelle is a very nice garden, made by the French artist Jaques Majorelle who decided in 1923 to live Marrakesh and purchased same land, and commissioned the architect Paus Sinoir to...
View More
Things to Do

Ali ben Youssef Mosque

This is the oldest surviving mosque in Marrakesh, and the largest of the mosques in the medina. It dates from the Almoravid era ( mid- late 12th century), but has been rebuilt several times, most...
View More
Things to Do

La Palmeraie

I visited this area of Marrakesh by the Hop on - Hop off Marrakech tour bus (see my transport tip for more details) It's also a short taxi ride from the city centre if you don't want to use this...
View More
Things to Do

The Mellah

The Mellah, or Jewish quarter, of Marrakech is famous for its spice market and so we headed there to see if we could get some of the colourful photos that markets usually provide – and nowhere more...
View More
Things to Do

Dyers District

After a pleasant time spent learning about the dyes and 'dressing up' ;-) (see previous tip!)I tried to explain that I wanted to see the skeins of wool hanging to dry (as I'd seen on post cards/guide...
View More

Getting to Marrakesh

Address

We don't yet have an address for this Restaurants. Help us improve our info!

Hours

We don't yet have hours for this Restaurants. Help us improve our info!

Map