Etosha National Park, Namibia

56 Reviews

Etosha National Park, northern Namibia
  • Springbock Herd
    Springbock Herd
    by MichaelFalk1969
  • Etosha National Park
    by turnip2000
  • Etosha National Park
    by turnip2000

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Etosha NP, A Great Desert Game Park

    by Waxbag Updated Dec 13, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Etosha is one of the largest game parks in Africa covering an area of 22,270 sq km. The central landmark here is the Etosha Pan. Covering nearly 5000 sq km, the pan is vast salt plain, remnant of a large inland lake. The pan is mostly dry but occasionally floods bringing thousands of flamingos and white pelicans. The surrounding limestone formations create a reservoir that supply the pan and various water holes with water to support the huge numbers of plant life and wildlife. Most of the vegetation grows around the surrounding pan in the limestone ground. Sweet grass and umbrella-thorn acacias provide the greatest source for browsers and grazers. The park boasts 114 species of mammal including black-faced impala, black rhino, mountain zebra, and brown hyena.

    Check out my Etosha National Park page for more information.
    Etosha National Park

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Various Antelope in Etosha
    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • diageva's Profile Photo

    Etosha

    by diageva Written Oct 21, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Of course Etosha is one of the must if you come to Namibia.

    I went in October, it was very hot, but we saw many animals. How you see them? ... you see them as you go driving along the park, but specially at the waterholes where they go to drink during day and night.

    What can you find there?
    Black Rhino (I saw)
    Elephant (I saw many)
    Gemsbok (I saw many)
    Giraffe (I saw many)
    Zebras (I saw many)
    Ostrich (I saw)
    Springbok (I saw many)
    Red Hartebeest (I saw many)
    Wildbeest ( I saw many)
    Lions ( I saw many .... two times, over 15 together and one alone)
    Kudu ( I saw many)

    I did went to Etosha with a very good guide Uanee. Thanks to him we saw all the animals we saw with detail.

    If you go to Etosha you should go with a good guide that will make you see every bird and go to the waterholes at the best times

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Etosha

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • Myndo's Profile Photo

    Nightly play at lighted waterholes - Etosha

    by Myndo Updated Sep 19, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oukakoueja Camp has (as the other two camps in Etosha Ntl Park: Halali and Namutoni) a waterhole that is lighted in the night. This one in Oukakoueja is the waterhole where you most likely see most animals.

    Starting after dark, it seems to be a theatrical play: Here come the giraffae, very cautious and slowly they proceed to the waterhole. Why so cautious? Because there are lions around. You haven´t seen them yet? But you will. They keep the giraffae at a distance, at least until the rhinoceros arrive.... and they only stay until the elefants come...

    Don´t forget: the gates of the Camps iin the park close at sunset. You have to be in before that happens

    More Tips: Dress with long sleeves and use a repellent against the mosquitoes.
    Take a flash light with you (especially, if you are not staying in the bungalows on the camp but on the campsite)

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Website: http://www.resafrica.net/okaukuejo/

    giraffae at etosha
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Overview of Etosha

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Etosha Game Park was declared a National Park in 1907. It covers an area of 22 270 square km, and while it isn’t as abundant with game as some of the more famous parks on the continent, it is home to 114 mammal species, 340 bird species, 110 reptile species, 16 amphibian species and one species of fish.

    Etosha means "Great White Place", and the name suits the landscape, which is dominated by a massive mineral pan. This covers around 25% of the National Park, and was originally a lake fed by the Kunene River. However the lake dried up when the course of the river changed thousands of years ago. The pan is now a large dusty depression of salt and dusty clay which fills only if the rains are heavy and even then only holds water for a short time. But the springs and water-holes which remain along the edges of the pan attract large concentrations of wildlife and birds, and are the prime spots for viewing game.

    The game viewing in Etosha National Park is excellent, the best time being from May to September - the cooler months in Namibia (we were there in July). Visitors can usually expect to see antelope, elephant, giraffe, rhino and lions, all of which we saw (though the lions only at night). Apparently some lucky visitors also see leopard and cheetah, but we didn’t here, although we did see the latter elsewhere in the country at Okonjima. There is a good network of roads linking the rest camps and various waterholes and other game viewing spots, all of which are navigable with a regular saloon car.

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Wildebeest
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Searching for elephants

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Etosha National Park in the northern part of Namibia is the best place in the country to see game animals, although it doesn’t compare to the game parks in some other African countries. You can stay in the park at one of several government-run rest camps (with fairly basic chalet style accommodation) or outside in more up-market lodges – we chose the former.

    If you’re staying at a private lodge there’s likely to be the possibility of guided game drives but we drove ourselves. That’s got a few advantages – you’re in control of where you go and how long you stay. On the other hand if you go with a guide they’ll probably be in touch with other guides and know where to go for the best recent sightings.

    Anyway, we did pretty well on our own. We saw lots of zebra, ostrich and giraffe, and were also really pleased to spot a rhino. My favourites are the elephants, and towards the end of the afternoon we found a large herd at a water-hole – definitely the highlight of our self-made game drive!

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Elephants at a water-hole Ostrich
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • grets's Profile Photo

    Etosha National Park

    by grets Written Jul 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the best game viewing parks in Africa, Etosha is a MUST on any itinerary. Its name means 'aGreat White Place of Dry Water' referring to the huge dried salt pan that dominates the park.

    Etosha is home to 114 species of mammal and 340 bird species.

    Dusty roads lead through the park with a speed limit of 60km/h.

    As elsewhere, the best time for wildlife viewing is dawn and dusk, but you are not allowed in the park after dark.

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Zebra in Etosha
    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Open air theatre

    by magor65 Written Aug 25, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Etosha is a must when you visit Namibia. It offers an abundance of wildlife and understandably attracts lots of visitors. There are two ways of observing animals in Etosha: game drives and viewing them at waterholes while you are staying at a campsite. The floodlit waterholes ( there are three of them in Etosha) allow you to watch animals practically for twenty four hours a day.
    I personally found the waterhole at the Okaukuejo camp the best place to observe animals. It was never empty, even at midday. Herds of antelopes, zebras and wildebeest visited it in daylight. So did the elephants that seem omnipresent in Etosha. After dusk the place became the stage for different animals. A couple of rhinos emerged from the darkness, followed by giraffes and then elephants again. The 'audience' sat in silence looking at the amazing spectacle.
    Game drives must be done at daylight but they are hardly ever disappointing. During one of them we spotted groups of lions in just a few km intervals amounting to about 25 of them altogether.

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    the queen Impressive horns Look up at me rhino at night going for a drink
    Related to:
    • Safari
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • SanguiniA's Profile Photo

    Etosha National Park

    by SanguiniA Updated Oct 8, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Etosha translates to the Great White Place, which is no surprise - it's pan is most easily seen from the plane, a wide expanse of shimmering white. Seen from the Etosha lookout the white explanse of snow-white sand seems impossibly interminable.

    Etosha is one of the prime attractions of Namibia, and one of the best National Parks in Africa. The arid conditions in the dry season cause animals to gather at specific waterholes, making them easy to view compared with other parks in Africa. Also, the park is made for self-driving, which is another plus in itself. Another definitive plus is that this is one of the best places in the world (if not the best) to see rhinos.

    Some of the animals in the park include: Black Rhino, White Rhino, Elephant, Windebeest, Oryx, Red Hartebeest, Black Faced Impala, Springbok, Zebra, Eland, Kudu, Giraffe, Dik-Dik, Warthog, Hyaena etc. Of course there are the big cats - lion, cheetah and leopard - though these might take a bit more work to find ... Etosha is also great for birdwatching. Look out for birds of prey, bustards, korhaans, hornbills, rollers, ostrich, helmeted guineafowl and secretarybirds.

    For more info about Etosha, and loads of other animal pics, check out my Etosha pages

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    S-T-R-E-T-C-H!!!! Rhino Etosha Landscape Elephant herd at waterhole
    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • grets's Profile Photo

    Namutoni Water Hole

    by grets Written Jul 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The waterholes attract much game, especially during the dry season. At one hole we were just about to leave, when a herd of elephants came silently from nowhere, including a tiny baby believed to be just a few days old. After taking their fill of water, they disappeared as quietly as they arrived. How can a large herd of elephant make no noise?

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • swakopgirl's Profile Photo

    Etosha National Park

    by swakopgirl Updated Jan 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Etosha is one of the largest game reserves in Africa, and is certainly one of the most rewarding. There is a huge variety of wildlife to be seen, including lion, elephant, giraffe, black rhino, zebra, kudu, oryx (gemsbok), impala, springbok, cheetah, leopard ........... the list goes on.

    There are also far far less tourists than in Eastern Africa, so people who have been on safari in Kenya tend to get a pleasant surprise.

    The best time to see Etosha is between May and September, which is the winter season. Although it is extremely dry during this time, you will actually see more game, as all the animals congregate at the water holes.

    Etosha is of course also very beautiful in summer and when it rains it is transformed into a lush paradise within days.

    There are three restcamps within Etosha: Namutoni (an old German colonial fort), Halali and Okaukuejo. All three have bungalows, a campsite, a petrol station, a supermarket, a kiosk, restaurant, picnic spot and a swimming pool. My favourite is Okaukuejo, although to experience Etosha properly I recommend staying at least one or two days at each of the restcamps. Book as far in advance as you can, as they all fill up very quickly.

    Address: North Namibia, North-West of Tsumeb

    Directions: Best way to get there is by car. The park is signposted, but buy a map. Or join a tour, but I prefer taking things at my own pace.

    Phone: +264-(0)61-236975

    Website: http://www.southafrica-travel.net/namibia/te_etosh.htm

    Etosha Wildlife
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Camping
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • THLIN's Profile Photo

    Wild Wild South West Africa

    by THLIN Written Sep 10, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a must when visiting Namibia. The siza of park is 4/5 of my island Taiwan. You can see most of the Big Five here. But I saw a lot of giraffs and zebras.
    If you go with a organised tour, I think you can standing on the seat of the bus looking out from the roof, which is a wonderful experience.

    Address: Etosha National Park, northern Namibia

    Directions: Head north out of Windhoek on the B1. Beyond the town of Tsumeb is the Von Lindequist gate area of Etosha.

    top of the BUS

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Etosha NP - elephants

    by King_Golo Written Sep 23, 2015

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    According to our guidebook, elephants are the eighth-most common animal in the Etosha NP. You are very likely to see some at one of the waterholes where they congregate with their families to drink, enjoy a mud bath or whizzing about (the little ones). It is great that there are still so many of them - in 1880, long before the first nature protection area was introduced in the area, they had been hunted down and rendered extinct in the area.

    Elephants are the biggest terrestrial mammal on earth. An average male elephant weighs up to 5 tons and can reach lengths of 4m. It is an incredible sight to see an elephant walk by just a few metres away from you, something which will definitely be the case in the national park. We saw a female elephant walk by 6m away from us, hiding her little one behind her. The little one was a bit too curious, though, and eventually fell behind, allowing us to snap a few great pictures.

    While female elephants spend their whole lives together with other females, male elephants are forced to leave such a group at the age of 14-15 years. They then wander around with other males or alone and eventually found their own family. Elephants grow very old - up to 60 years, but the oldest elephant ever recorded died in a Taiwanese zoo aged 86! They normally die of starvation. The reason for this is that their last set of teeth is worn down and they can't chew food anymore. Elephants have six different sets of teeth during their life. Interestingly, their new teeth don't grow under the old ones and push them out, but at the back of their mouth with the new teeth moving forward to replace the old ones.

    When photographing elephants, make sure that they are well-lit. In particular the older ones have some very interesting wrinkles which look good on photos. Elephants in close-up normally don't look too good, so you might want to include them in a wider panoramic view. Alternatively, zoom in on parts of them and combine these with other elements to create a nice picture.

    Directions: northern Namibia, about 400km northwest of Windhoek

    Elephants leaving Okaukuejo's waterhole
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Etosha NP - springboks

    by King_Golo Written Sep 25, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The most common animal in the Etosha NP is also one of its most graceful. Brown, white and black, slender, equipped with two decorative horns, springboks are literally everywhere in the park (and quite common outside of it as well). It doesn't matter how barren and empty the landscape, how hot and dry the day, how devoid of trees the area - a group of springboks will find a tiny little bit of grass or a branch to nibble on. In some very barren parts of the Etosha NP, they seem to be the only sign that one is still on earth and not on the moon or some other orb.

    Springboks are among the fastest land animals of the world. They can run with speeds of up to 90km/h and reach an enormous 60km/h after just two seconds. My car isn't able to do that... Their name derives from the jumps they carry out. They can reach heights of more than 3.5m from a standing position! Biologists are still unsure as to why they perform their jumps. Some suggest that it's a warning sign for predators - "we've seen you, don't waste your energy to hunt us!" -, others believe that they want to warn other members of the same species. However, it's also common for young springboks to jump for joy. We witnessed a bunch of them jump-and-running away rapidly, but unfortunately they were too far away to capture them on film. Instead, we saw some males fighting fervently just in front of our truck. After lots of dust-raising and head-banging, one of them had to leave the scene.

    One last thing for the carnivores among you: springbok meat is edible and very tasty. One of the best meals I had in Africa was a springbok stew. Allegedly, their meat is even exported to Europe. Maybe I should find out about that...

    Directions: northern Namibia, about 400km northwest of Windhoek

    Springboks, ostriches and oryx drinking together Springboks fighting
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Etosha NP - ostriches

    by King_Golo Written Sep 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When driving through the barren landscape of the Etosha NP, you will more often than not see huge black dots on the horizon. Getting closer, you will discover that they are not boulders or anything the like, but ostriches, the world's largest birds. As male ostriches can grow to a height of 2.5m, they are easily visible even in the far distance. In fact, the black ones are always male ostriches. Female ostriches are brownish. There is a simple, yet ingenious reason for that. When breeding, female ostriches take over the day shift while male ostriches breed at night. Consequently, their plumage is adapted to the respective time of the day.

    Male ostriches gather a harem of females around them, but one of the hens is the "main hen". The "subordinate hens" will also lay their eggs in the main hen's nest, but she is able to distinguish between their eggs and hers and will shift the others towards the side of the nest. The subordinate hens are then shooed away, but the eggs are kept. This is advantageous for both the main hen and her competitors. The former keeps her eggs in the safest part of the nest, the middle. The latter, while not present anymore, will have her eggs hatched. It's still a risky situation - only 10% of all eggs are successfully hatched. Vultures, jackals and hyenas are simply too fond of those eggs...

    Ostriches can't fly, but are very skilled at running. A grown-up ostrich can run with speeds of up to 70km/h! This is normally enough to run away from predators - in particular as they can keep high speeds of 50km/h for half an hour or longer. We didn't see any running ostriches, but they appear quite graceful when walking or drinking and always make for a good photograph.

    Directions: northern Namibia, about 400km northwest of Windhoek

    Quite small next to elephants: the ostrich
    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    Etosha NP - rhinos

    by King_Golo Written Sep 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The hook-lipped rhinoceros is getting rarer and rarer, but if you are lucky, you can see some in the Etosha NP. We were - and saw two males settling a dispute concerning who can drink where at the waterhole. It was a spectacular view - the more dominant rhino approached the other one threateningly and kind of pushed it into the water where it remained unmoving and humble. Only when the dominant male walked away to its side of the waterhole, the other rhino moved again. Interestingly, the rest of the animals around didn't care at all - zebras and springboks were drinking undisturbed of the argument next to them. We later learned that rhinos have the highest rate of mortal combat among all mammals: 50% of the males and 30% of the females die because of combat-related injuries!

    In the Etosha NP, you can only see the hook-lipped rhinoceros. Its closest relative, the square-lipped rhinoceros, does not occur there. The hook-lipped rhinoceros loves eating acacia leaves while its relative prefers grass. Males can grow to about 1.8m height and 3.5m length, their horns typically measure some 50cm. These horns are also their main means of attack. Apparently, hook-lipped rhinoceroses are very aggressive and charge at anything that they believe to be a danger to them. Due to their bad eyesight, this might be the best strategy...

    Directions: northern Namibia, about 400km northwest of Windhoek

    Two rhinos, one waterhole = trouble!
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner

Instant Answers: Namibia

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

22 travelers online now

Comments