Carthage Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty
  • guinea-fowls
    guinea-fowls
    by croisbeauty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Carthage

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    Beautiful Sidi Bou Said

    by starship Updated Mar 1, 2016

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    The nearby town of Sidi Bou Said must be one of the most picturesque villages in Tunisia and shouldn't be missed. Famous for its visually intense white-washed buildings trimmed in Cerulean blue, and the flowering bourgainvillea, the village is overflowing with physical charm. With its perfect location on the Gulf of Tunis, it is no wonder it was a favorite spot among famous artists of the early 20th century, who came to capture the wonderful color and light. Be sure to take a look at the beautiful and individually decorated doors in Sidi Bou Said. They are unique!

    Today you will find it a delightful place to sightsee, shop, take tea or even stay a few days at one of the hotels perched on the hillside. Shopping can be fun because of the many little shops lining the narrow, cobblestoned lanes who take great pride in displaying the colorful ceramics, hand-painted pottery, mosaics, hammered copper, silver & glass tea sets, and leather goods in an eye-catching way. Bargaining is expected. I came home with some wonderful pieces of pottery and ceramics, olive soap, postcards and a leather purse.
    The tomb of the town's patron saint Sidi Bou Said (St. Louis to the Christians) is said to be here very near all the shopping areas. The famous "Cafe Nantes" is here and you will see it depicted on ceramics and other items.

    Don't miss the splendid views of the Bay of Tunis from one of the many narrow, side streets.

    I wish I had had much more time to explore Sidi Bou Said, but we were off to see another part of Carthage!

    Shopping & touristic streets in Sidi Bou Said One of the beautiful doors in the village Postcard showing Sidi Bou's magnificent location
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    • Arts and Culture

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Roman urns?

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 19, 2014

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    This round look rocks remind me on urns I have seen while ago in Aquileia - Italy, where one of the most important town from Roman times were situated. Since there are no information in the park regarding this rocks I am only guessing it.
    I would be very grateful for any information in this regard.

    are this Roman urns?
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    The hidden grave

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 19, 2014

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    This tomb is situated in the vicinity of the fence of the presidential palace. I couldn't find any useful information weather it is of Punic or Roman origins. Most of the Roman tombs, I've seen so far, are always placed in the open burial spaces, so it might be of the Punic origin.
    There are speculations that ancient Carthaginians used to kill children whom they sacrificed to the pagan gods. It was first announced by the Romans, who were sworn enemies, and the answer by Carthaginians was that it were dirty insinuations by Rome. In recent times, however, after the children's graves has been found, it was proved that Romans did not insinuated.

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    The byrds

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 18, 2014

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    I saw this group of birds by chance, hidden in the shadow of the walls in the area of Antonine Baths. In my language we call them "biserka", guinea-fowl in English.
    This bird usually disturb African predators (big cats) when hunting, making very loud voices and thus warn of danger That is why the animals, which are predators.prey, like to have them in the vicinity. .

    guinea-fowls
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    Tophet

    by brazwhazz Written Jun 8, 2006

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    Perhaps Carthage's most "out-of-way" archeological site, the Tophet is a burial ground where a number of Carthaginian children were sacrificed to the gods Tanit and Baal Hammon, mainly between the 4th and 2nd centuries BC. There is some controversy regarding the sacrifices: while the Romans used the sacrifices to depict the Carthaginians as gruesome people, some people now believe these only occurred in times of extraordinary hardship and that in most cases, lambs, goats and dead children were used as replacement sacrifices.

    The Tophet is near Carthage Salammb├┤ TGM station on Rue Hannibal. It can be visited with the Carthage multiple-entry ticket.

    The Tophet is closed on Mondays. During the high season (April to mid-September), it is open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., while during the low season (mid-September to March), it is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

    Grim steles at the Tophet
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Archeology

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Carthage Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Carthage off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Carthage sightseeing.

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