Carthage Travel Guide

  • Antonine Baths
    by croisbeauty
  • Antonine Baths
    by croisbeauty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by croisbeauty

Carthage Things to Do

  • Antonine Baths

    The full name of is the Baths of Antoninus Pius. Along with Archeological Park which you walk through to reach the baths, these are probably the most important and well known exhibits of Carthage. These ruins were built betwwen 145 and 165AD. The baths said to be some of the largest of the Roman times with the main pool being the size of an Olympic...

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  • Carthage Museum - Musee National de...

    This museum is housed in the former French cathedral seminary on Byrsa Hill. It features some fine 5th century AD mosaics, Punic and Early Christian antiquities, jewellery and ornaments, everyday objects, clay masks, little heads in coloured glass paste with large staring eyes, funerary stelae, sarcophagi and models of the Tophet and the Capitol...

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  • Carthage Ancient Site

    If you're visiting northern Tunisia then you simply can't miss Carthage as it was here that the Romans ruled their north African empire. Carthage lies about 15km (9 miles) east of Tunis which makes it an ideal place to visit for a day out (see one of my travelogues about a walking tour). Carthage was a great ancient city and port where the military...

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  • Roman Villas

    Overlooking the site of the remains of other Roman Villas is a re-constructed villa known as Villa of the Aviary due to its fine mosaics of birds. You get a good sense of how big and lavish a well-to-do Roman Villa would have looked like.

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  • Roman Theatre

    Located near the remains of some Roman Villas, this Roman Theatre was built in the 2nd century AD and could accomodate 5,000 spectators. The stage, slightly raised, is backed by a scenae frons (stage wall). After much earlier alteration and destruction the theater has now been almost completely restored, and is used for open-air performances in...

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  • Byrsa Hill

    This, I think, was once a huge colonnaded basilica built on Byrsa Hill. It measured 85m long and 48m wide and was built in the late 2nd century AD but was destroyed and its materials robbed during the period of Vandal rule.

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  • Amphitheatre

    On our way to what I thought would be our last destination, the North Africa American Cemetery, our bus stops on the side of the road. At first we don't know why because all we see are a couple of roadside gift stands and the attendants. Then looking over the shoulders of these dusty fellows we're stunned to see the remains of the Roman Ampitheatre...

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  • Acropolium - Cathedral of St. Louis

    The deconsecrated Cathedral of St. Louis was built in an oddly eclectic Gothic/Byzantine/Moorish style back in 1884. It is set at the top of Byrsa Hill, which is the place where, according to legend, Queen Dido founded Qart Hadash (Phoenician for "new city"). In the 1990s, it was renamed "Acropolium" and became an exhibit and concert hall....

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  • North Africa American Cemetery

    A very nice gentleman greeted us when we arrived and asked if we had visited the cemetery before, asked if we had any questions (which we did) and gave us a fact sheet about the cemetery that was very interesting and helpful. He asked us if we would like to sign the guest book which we gladly did. Upon entering the gates of the cemetery, you will...

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  • Mosaic

    Next to the exit door of the complex stands this lovely mosaic picturing horses, unfortunately without any explanation about. I couldn't find out whether it is from the Punic or Roman period of Carthage. Tunisia preserves one of the world's largest collection of Roman mosaics, which can be seen in Bardo Museum in the capital town of Tunis.

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  • The Tophet

    Tophet is the name given to places of child sacrifice in the Middle East. Here in Carthage it is the area in which many archaeologists believe child sacrifices took place. These sacrifices may not have been as common as the number of gravestones in the area lead you to believe, however. Many families scarificed small animals like goats in place of...

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  • Punic Ports

    The main part of Carthage port had two harbours that were linked with a 70 feet entrance to the sea. This entrance could be closed when required by the use of an iron chain. It had a capacity for 220 ships.Unfortunately the Romans destroyed the port and there are very few remains, except for the odd piece of stone lying on the ground. There are one...

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Carthage Hotels

  • Villa Didon

    Rue Mendes France, Carthage, 2016, Tunisia

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Families

    Hotel Class 5 out of 5 stars

Carthage Restaurants

  • Great cafe

    Yam's is a typical Tunisian cafe opposite the Monoprix supermarket near Carthage Dermech station. After I finished spending the day walking around the sights, I came here and sat outside for a rest, cup of good coffee and a fantastic chocolate and banana crepe, which I highly recommend having.

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  • Near Carthage Dermech station

    One of only a few places to get any food in Carthage, Baguette is a fast food burger restaurant that is similar to a McDonalds or Burger King with similar food and decor. It's located near the Monoprix supermarket near Carthage Dermech station. It's a good idea to get food either in here or in the supermarket before you set off around the sights.

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  • Picnic Lunch in Carthage

    There aren't very many restaurants in Carthage and those that are found there tend to be expensive. Hence, it makes sense to bring a picnic lunch, especially if you plan on seeing a lot of the ruins and if the weather is fine. Alternatively you could spend the morning in Carthage and take a train to nearby Sidi Bou Said for lunch. We brought a...

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Carthage Transportation

  • TGM from Tunis

    The best way to get to Carthage and Sidi Bou Said is by taking the small suburban train known as the TGM. It travels from the Tunis Marine TGM station at the eastern end of Ave Habib Bourguiba and passes through La Goulette, Carthage and Sid Bou Said before ending at La Marsa. Second class costs about 650 mills and can be quite crowded whilst first...

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  • Walking Tour

    According to my copy of Lonely Planet Tunisia, "...you will need near superhuman stamina..." to cover all the sights that Carthage has to offer. Although the sights are very spread out, you can visit them fairly easily in one day but, be warned, you will have to walk a fair distance between them to achieve this (about 6km/4 miles). Now, I'm not the...

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  • By Train from Tunis

    Carthage is very easy to reach from Tunis. Regular trains leave from the Tunis Marine TGM station in the Ville Nouvelle and stop at all 6 stations in Carthage. The ruins are spread out over a large area in Carthage. Carthage Dermach or Hannibal are probably the most convenient as they are in the centre near the museum and the majority of the ruins....

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Carthage Local Customs

  • Visitng The Sights In Carthage

    There is a global tickets that covers entry into all of the sights at Carthage. It is about 5.5 dinars. You also have to pay an extra 1 dinar if you wish to take photos. The sights are open daily from 8am - 7pm from April to mid-September and from 8.30am-5pm at other times of the year.The sights are fairly well spread out over a couple of...

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  • Visiting Mosques

    Many countries, including Tunisia, are predominantly Muslim, so the religious sites you are most likely to encounter, are, predictably, mosques. This is a brief tip of advice, written from the point of view of a non-Muslim, female traveler (yours truly!!!):- Do dress modestly, covering arms, legs, shoulders and the like, no frivolous dressing will...

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  • Carthage Hotels

    1 Hotels in Carthage

Carthage Warnings and Dangers

  • ALWAYS CARRY SUFFICIENT FRESH BOTTLED...

    When travelling in these extremely hot equatorial or desert climates ALWAYS make sure that you are carrying enough fresh bottled drinking water to get you through the day..Visiting archaelogical sites such as this I find there is usually very little shade and walking for long periods is neccesary.You may be surprised at how much water you will...

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  • Do not take photos.........

    ........of the Presidential Palace, which is right next to the site of the Antonine Baths.It is a very nice piece of architecture, with some pretty bougainvilla etc, but the guards get very cross indeed if you take any photos at all. You can tell it's important by all the flags, and all the armed guards.So I didn't take a photo of it.This one is of...

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  • Watch out for the 'guardien'.

    At the aqueduct site (where we had stopped for lunch at an on-site cafe) , after I had wandered along taking photos, I was approached quite aggressively by the 'guardien', a man who had been sitting in the shade.He demanded 10 dinar (5GBP!) for the 'ticket'. Knowing (I thought) that this was not a ticketed site, I argued politely and then just...

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Carthage Tourist Traps

  • The Theatre

    We visited the Theatre on my first trip to Carthage. When we arrived the cleaners were busy removing all the rubbish that had been left behind the previous evening. Virtually all of the theatre has been reconstructed and it is almost impossible to find any of the original stones. Now it looks like what it is - a reconstruction, and not a good one...

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  • The market!!!

    It seem like a tourist trap to me, when a tour guide take to the market. When i went to the market, it seem like i was being corner in the shop and could not leave until i buy something. And you have to push your way out of the shop. It was crazy! Other then that it was not to bad. The only thing that made it a poor experience for me is, I had some...

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  • Copies of old coins!

    In every site you will be hamnging around, you will be stopped by some people trying to sell you “old coins”. That is clearly a tourist trap as those coins are NOTHING, just copies and bulls***s!!! So, take care!!!

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Carthage What to Pack

  • sun

    the less weight as possible because yur gone walk quite a while... light clothes thru out tunisia and especially in carthage where it is always very hot ... bring all yur photo gear and ready to snapshot hundred clics... along with light clothes, also light shoes are recommendeble. and don't forget yur hat and shades and water.bring along water...

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  • Prepare to Mediterranean Sun

    Prefer light bags for a comfortable walk. A bottle of drink water is also recommended. Summer clothes and proper shoes for walk. Additionaly hat for protection from sun. Protective lotion or oil. A digital camera must be in your list of course.

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  • Fighting the Heat - Part I

    Travels to places like Tunisia involves a lot of fighting the heat, especially if you, like me (I am still surprised as to why I did that), go there right in the middle of the summer. Here’s a list of useful items to take:- Hats and other covering: Large brimmed hats that provide head covering and some shade. For women, they are also a proof of...

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Carthage Off The Beaten Path

  • Beautiful Sidi Bou Said

    The nearby town of Sidi Bou Said must be one of the most picturesque villages in Tunisia and shouldn't be missed. Famous for its visually intense white-washed buildings trimmed in Cerulean blue, and the flowering bourgainvillea, the village is overflowing with physical charm. With its perfect location on the Gulf of Tunis, it is no wonder it was a...

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  • Roman urns?

    This round look rocks remind me on urns I have seen while ago in Aquileia - Italy, where one of the most important town from Roman times were situated. Since there are no information in the park regarding this rocks I am only guessing it. I would be very grateful for any information in this regard.

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  • The hidden grave

    This tomb is situated in the vicinity of the fence of the presidential palace. I couldn't find any useful information weather it is of Punic or Roman origins. Most of the Roman tombs, I've seen so far, are always placed in the open burial spaces, so it might be of the Punic origin.There are speculations that ancient Carthaginians used to kill...

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Carthage General

See all 18 General in Carthage
  • Pay to Snap Those Pictures

    It is becoming increasingly more common to be charged an extra fee in addition to an admission fee in order to take photos of famous museums or historical sights around the world, and this was also the case for Carthage. Although we obviously visited with a tour group, our guide was obliged to collect 1 Tunisian Dinar or 1 Euro from those wishing...

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  • Money Matters

    The local currency is the Dinar. American Express, Visa and travellers cheques are widely accepted, and the US dollar is a good currency to carry them in. ATMs are found in almost every town large enough to support a bank and certainly in all the tourist areas. Credit cards are accepted in souvenir shops and upmarket hotels and restaurants.

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  • One ticket for all sites

    When you enter your first tourist sight, you're able to visit the rest of the sights with one all day ticket which saves you having to but individual tickets all the time. The ticket costs TD7 plus TD1 for camera charge and covers the amphitheatre, Roman villas, Roman Theatre, Paleo-Christian Museum, Carthage Museum on Byrsa Hill, Sanctuary of...

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Explore Deeper into Carthage
The byrds
Off The Beaten Path
Antoine Baths
Things to Do
Acropolium (former Cathedral of St. Louis)
Things to Do
Museum of Carthage
Things to Do
North Africa American Cemetery ~ Part II
Things to Do
Sanctuary of Tophet
Things to Do
Photographers' Alert
Warnings and Dangers
North Africa American Cemetery ~ Part 1
Things to Do
Carthage's Roman Ampitheatre
Things to Do
Cathedral of St. Louis
Things to Do
Magon Quarter
Things to Do
Antonine Baths
Things to Do
Chapel of Asterius
Things to Do
Villa of the Aviary
Things to Do
Roman Villas
Things to Do
Roman Theatre
Things to Do
La Marsa Cisterns
Things to Do
El Abidine Mosque
Things to Do
Amphitheatre
Things to Do
Models & maps
General
Carthage Museum
Things to Do
Basilica on Byrsa Hill
Things to Do
Punic residential quarter
Things to Do
Byrsa Hill
Things to Do
L'Acropolium
Things to Do
Basilica of Carthagenna
Things to Do
Naval Port
Things to Do
Merchant Port
Things to Do
Carthage
Things to Do
Carthage, The headquater.
Things to Do
The National Museum of Carthage
Things to Do
The Antonine Baths ~ The Roman Way of Life
Things to Do
Antonine Thermal Baths ~ An Introduction
Things to Do
National Museum of Carthage
Things to Do
Antonine Baths
Things to Do
Sanctuary of Tophet
Things to Do
The Punic Ports
Things to Do
Roman Amphitheatre
Things to Do
L'Acropolium
Things to Do
Byrsa Hill
Things to Do

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Map of Carthage