Angkor Wat Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Belsaita
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Belsaita
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Belsaita

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Angkor Wat

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    A local food market

    by Belsaita Updated Jan 27, 2016

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    Yes... I'm an Asian Markets junkie... Photographer's heaven!
    Go as early as you can.

    ****************************************
    VT said that this tip was not appearing in travel guides because it was too short. I do not agree that a minimum of 200 characters will always help other travelers more, especially when the tip is basically self-explanatory. Therefore, this text is here just to add characters.

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    Ta Pech - South Entrance

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 17, 2015

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    The south entrance or "South Gate" is probably the least visited of all the gates to Angkor Wat. As with the other gates, you can access Ta Pech from the interior section of Angkor Wat or from the outer wall trail. I came upon it while hiking the outer wall trail. It is in relatively good shape. There is some alter items inside, more so than I have seen at other areas around Angkor Wat. It seems the Monks perform rituals and prayer sessions here because it is away from the main tourist area at the temple.

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    Ta Loek - North Entrance

    by blueskyjohn Updated Jul 17, 2015

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    The north entrance of Angkor Wat is rarely visited. It can be accessed from the interior courtyard of Angor Wat or along the outer wall trail. The "North Gate" is in relatively good condition. My first time at the wall I arrived just as a thunderstorm hit. There was a Buddhist Monk performing a ceremony with three younger monks and several Khmer children and women were watching. This is a credit to how seldom this entrance is visited.

    Once the rain started, the ceremony stopped and we all took shelter in the entrance building. It was interesting to see how well the water stayed out of such an old building. But in time the found its way in creating a small pond in the middle of the floor.

    It is definitely worth the effort to walk out to the entrance!

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    Bakong III - Rolous Group

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    Surrounding the central temple are eight brick and sandstone towers, many of which are still covered with their original plasterwork.

    The remains were reclaimed from the encroaching jungle from which the new monastery was built.

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    Bakong II - Rolous Group

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    Originally surrounded by a moat, the temple is a five-tiered affair, with carvings of elephants (some still standing) on the corners of the lower three levels.

    Equally impressive as the elephants are the lion statues, to be found at the base of the main stairwell leading up to the central sanctuary at the top.

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    Bakong - Rolous Group

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    Bakong is the biggest of the Rolous Group monuments, with an active Buddhist monastery on the site.

    Built and dedicated to Shiva around 900 AD, Bakong served as the central temple. The sandstone central pyramid is some 60 metres square at its base, so a significant construction of its time.

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    Preah Ko - Rolous Group

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    On the other side of the highway from Lolei is Preah Ko.

    It is known as the temple of the ancestors, and, although little remains of the whole enclosure, likely to have been part of the royal palace of Indravarman I. Preah Ko is believed to have been consecrated in 879 AD. It is a small temple - 6 sanctuary towers sharing the same base (front central tower being the larger).

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    Lolei - Rolous Group

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    About 15kms east of Siam Reap is the Rolous Group of monuments.

    Older than Angkor (around 900 AD), Rolous was the capital of Indravarman I. Lolei is a small monument, usually the first to be visited among the Rolous as it is separated by the highway from the main group (on the left of the highway if approaching form Siam Reap).

    Four brick towers, carvings and Sanskrit inscriptions, it's a perfect introduction to the temples of Angkor (I went here before going to Angkor itself) and Khmer architecture. The scale (and the fact it was deserted when I went there) allows a very close look.

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    Vietnamese Floating Village

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    A few miles outside Siam Reap is the Vietnamese Floating Village at Phnom Krom on Tonle Sap Lake (it is, in fact, the arrival point of the ferry from Phnom Penh). Lush green countryside, red dust roads all the way from Siam Reap, past a way of life that hasn't changed much for centuries. The Floating Village is also a way of life that has hardly changed in centuries.

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    Dry Season

    by leffe3 Updated Mar 21, 2012

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    The Village actually moves as the dry season encroaches. The main centre may well be found on the shores of the lake, but, over time, the village has gradually moved up river. But for a few months of the year, these new 'suburbs' move down river to join the main town on the banks of the lake (most of these homes were in the process of moving).

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    A Bus from Bangkok to Ankor Wat

    by csnyder Updated Apr 4, 2011

    I wrote this description of my trip to Cambodia for two reasons. One, I could. I had recently bought a smartphone with a small folding QWERTY keyboard and it comes with a document processor. And second, because I had time as I had decided to take a bus, as I will describe below.

    I decided I wanted to go to Cambodia, mostly because the idea of having Thanksgiving in Thailand was not appealing, especially after last years Thanksgiving in Iraq. Also, leaving Thailand allowed me to renew my Visa without question and mine was about to expire the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Anyway, I decided on a 3 day 2 night package trip because I had no idea what to expect. The trip was taking a bus all the way from Bangkok to Angkor, Cambodia. I wanted to go there because I had read about the ancient ruins.

    The bus trip was interesting. I had never been on a bus trip like this anywhere in the world so it was a new experience in many ways (and it gave me time to write this). The way to the Cambodian border from Bangkok was uneventful, from there on is a different story. At the border, we had to wait while our visas were processed. There I was warned about Cambodian children being thieves, later i found out they are also annoying beggars. "Beware of the children" became my general theme for the trip.

    The pictoral essay can be found on my website below:

    This area was used in Tomb Raider...
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    Baksei Chamkrong

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 27, 2010

    Baksei Chamkrong is located about 250m from the south gate of Angkor Thom on the left-hand side of the road. The beginning of its construction is ascribed to Harshavarmam I, but it was probably finished by his successor Rajendravarmam II in 947 and dedicated to Shiva. Baksei Chamkrong is a relatively small monument at 42ft (13m) high on a square pyramid with a set of steps leading up 88ft (27m) on each side.

    The name Baksei Chamkrong means "The Bird Who Shelters Under Its Wings" and comes from a legend. In it, the king tried to flee Angkor during a siege and then a huge bird landed and sheltered him under its wings.

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    Ta Prohm Kel

    by Willettsworld Written Apr 27, 2010

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    This rather precarious looking tower stands just over the road from Angkor Wat, just off the road that heads north into Angkor Thom. It is one of 102 chapels of the hospitals built at the behest of Jayavarmam VII.

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    Walking to Kbal Spean

    by GrumpyDiver Written Mar 27, 2010

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    If you are not in good shape, you might want to consider skipping this activity. We were there last March and it is a long, hot and arduous climb uphill to get there, and we are reasonably fit for our age (mid-50's). We were told to stick to the path as it lies in an area that has not been cleared of landmines.

    If you do decide to go, I would suggest you take lots of water (at least 1 litre per person), hiking boots and a walking stick. You will be climbing over rocks.

    Crossing the stream - if you can see the lingas in the water, you know you are fairly shallow.

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  • Traveling_Duck's Profile Photo

    Tonle Sap - further than the floating village

    by Traveling_Duck Written Jan 23, 2009

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    Most tourists don't go any further than Chong Khneas, the floating village, and that is ok. However, a trip to the Kompong Phluk village, 16 km south of Siem Reap, takes you to another world. Life here ebbs and flows with the seasons, and depends entirely upon the waters of the lake. The houses are built on stilts, within the floodplain of the Tonle Sap lake. The people are so used to life on the water that during the dry season, when their houses look awkward on their very high (6 meters) stilts, they go out onto the lake and build temporary houses there. The village is not yet spoiled by mass tourism, but does have a guesthouse, where we had a delicious lunch. People are incredibly poor and their life must be tremendously hard, but their smiles are all genuine.

    Household on stilts, Kompong Phluk village Komplong Phluk village The guest house in Kompong Phluk Cute kids in Kompong Phluk Dof and pig on the water, Kompong Phluk

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