Red Fort, Delhi

4 out of 5 stars 121 Reviews

Don't miss these tickets and tour deals!
Get best Red Fort rates on Viator
  • Army headquarters.
    Army headquarters.
    by pfsmalo
  • Drum house.
    Drum house.
    by pfsmalo
  • Red Fort
    by pfsmalo

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Red Fort is a Must See Attraction while in Delhi

    by AbeK Updated Apr 13, 2016

    You can spend hours wondering through this attraction. It is best to go early in the morning in order to avoid the long lines. Once inside, take your time to explore all aspects of this wonderful attraction. Each building has so much history and takes time to explore. Give yourself at least a half day in order to see all the buildings inside this complex. There are also plenty of small gift shops upon entering this attraction, so wait until you are ready to leave before buying anything. This way you do not have to carry it while you are visiting the complex.

    Address: New Delhi

    Directions: In the heart of Delhi. Just ask any taxi driver to take you there.

    Phone: 631-878-3327

    Website: http://www.meeting-planner-services.com

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Red Fort (Lal Quila)

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 24, 2016

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Unfortunately, we came to Lal Kila in the evening, when access inside was already closed, and we were able to examine it only from the outside. Lal Qila or Red-fort was built in the middle of XVII-th century in the Age of the Mughals. Its name derives from the red brick wall of the length of about two and a half kilometers.
    It’s very reminiscent of the Red Fort in Agra.

    You can watch my 1 min 04 sec Video Along Delhi by bus photos out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Address: Netaji Subhash Marg, New Delhi, India (Chandni Cho

    Directions: You can watch my photo of Delhi on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 28° 39' 20.33" N 77° 14' 15.90" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Red Fort (Lal Quila).

    Red Fort (Lal Quila) Red Fort (Lal Quila)
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • pfsmalo's Profile Photo

    The Red Fort, Delhi.

    by pfsmalo Updated Aug 13, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the principal sites of Delhi and visited by thousands is the Red Fort or Lal Quila. Magnificent 30 odd metre sandstone walls, by their colour give the name. Built from 1638 by the Mughal emperors on the transfer of the capital from Agra to what became Shahjahanabad, it took 9 years to complete. At one time there were 14 gates into the fort but now only two are used for entry the main one being Lahori on the west side facing Chandni Chowk bazaar. After passing the Lahore gate one passes through the Chatta Chowk passage which houses a few jewel shops and other tourist merchandise, certainly more expensive than can be found outside.
    After that there is the Drum House where musicians used to lay and which now houses the army museum. After passing this building a vista opens up mainly to the Public Audience Hall with the womens quarters to the right and the Private Audience Hall to the left slightly behind.

    Cost for foreigners is 250 INR, free up to 15 years of age. Photography (still cameras) is free.

    Address: Netaji Subhash Marg, Lal Qila, Chandni Chowk New D

    Directions: Between Chandni Chowk bazaar and the Yamuna river. Closest metro is Chandni Chowk on the yellow line. There is a new line (not yet built) that will go directly into the Red Fort at Lahore Gate.

    Website: http://www.redfortdelhi.co.in/

    The imposing Lahori Gate. Drum house. Public Audience Hall. (Diwan-I-Am) Private Audience Hall (Diwan-I-Khas). Army headquarters.

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • pfsmalo's Profile Photo

    The Red Fort, Delhi. II

    by pfsmalo Updated Aug 13, 2015

    There are plenty of other buildings in the grounds including the Building used by the British Army for its headquarters from 1857 and it needs a good full afternoon to visit everything here. An open park and shade down at the end.

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • Bernd_L's Profile Photo

    The Red Fort

    by Bernd_L Written Jan 19, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This impressive fortress is Delhis most famous building. It's located in the old Delhi part of the city and was once the Palace of the Moguls.

    We only saw it from outside because we visited on a sunday and there was a big crowd waiting in front of the entrance and our sightseeing tour didn't give us enough time to go inside.

    Delhis Red Fort

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • vinod-bhojak's Profile Photo

    Red fort:Lal Kila

    by vinod-bhojak Written Dec 10, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Red fort is one of the great historical monument of India. First of all we will start from its name. It is known as red fort because there are too much use of red stones in construction of red fort. And because of extensive use of red stones in great walls of fort it is known as red fort (LAL QILA). In 1638 Mughal king shah jahan has decided to shift to shift his capital in delhi from agra and thus Shah jahan started the construction of red fort at the bank of yamuna river in old delhi. He assigns ustad ahmed and ustad hamid as a architect for constructing royal palace. Construction of red fort was completed by shah jahan in year of 1648. Red fort is originally known as 'Qila-i-Mubarak' . The reason behind this name is that it was the residence of royal family.
    The attraction of red fort is the great and huge wall of red fort. The wall has two entrance one at the Lahore gate and other at the delhi gate. Lahore gate is the main entrence point of red fort. This wall is assuming that 2 km long which looks awesome in red stones. So friends this the great history behind Red fort which is constructed by the mughal king shah jahan in 1648. I must say that visit this place at least once in your life.Have a nice day.The Red Fort houses the Diwan-i-Aam or the Hall of Public Audiences, where the emperor would sit in a marbled paneled alcove, studded with gems, and hear the complaints of the common people. The Diwan-i-Khas or the Hall of Private Audience, was a place where the private audiences were granted. This hall was made of marble, and its centre was embellished with the Peacock Throne, which was studded with rubies and gems. Today, although the Diwan-i-Khas is only a pale shadow of its original glory, yet the verse of Amir Khusro ” If there is Paradise on the face of earth, it is here, it is here, it is here” reminds us of its former glory. The Rang Mahal or the ‘Palace of Colours’ as it is known, holds a spectacular Lotus-shaped fountain, made out of a single piece of marble, and housed the emperor’s wives and mistresses.

    The other attractions enclosed within this monument are the hammams or the Royal Baths, the Shahi Burj, which used to be Shah Jahan’s private working area, and the Moti Masjid or the Pearl Mosque. Even today, the Red Fort (Lal Qila) is an eloquent reminder of the glory of the Mughal Empire.

    Address: In Old Delhi near Chandni Chowk

    Red Fort Diwan-i-Khas Marble Flower art in Diwan-i-Khas Red fort Red Fort
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • goutammitra's Profile Photo

    Peacock Throne

    by goutammitra Written Aug 27, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was the place where the famous Peacock Throne used to be kept. It was looted by Persian Invader Nader Shah in 1738, who returned to Persia ( present day of Iran) in 1739. After the death of Nader Shah ( he was assassinated in 1747) , the Peacock Throne is untraceable till date. It may be dismantled or melted. Some historian refer it was donated to The Ottomans or used by Shah of Iran Mohmmadd Reza Pehlvi.

    The name comes from the shape of a throne, having the figures of two peacocks standing behind it, their tails being expanded and the whole so inlaid with sapphires, rubies, emeralds, pearls and other precious stones of appropriate colors as to represent life, created for the Mughal Badshah Shah Jahan of India in the 17th century, which was in his imperial capital Delhi's Public audience hall, the Diwan-i-Am. Shah Jahan had the famous Koh-i-noor diamond placed in this throne.

    This was the seat of Power: The Peacock Throne
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • goutammitra's Profile Photo

    The Red Fort, the seat of power of Mughals

    by goutammitra Written Aug 27, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visiting Delhi, the first thing a tourist want is to visit the famed Red Fort, it is situated just outside Old Delhi railway station and Jama Masjid & Chandni Chowk. The Fort lies along the Jamuna river and surrounded by moat. Inside the fort a full fledged bazar is there called the Meena Bazar.

    Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, started construction of the massive fort in 1638 and work was completed in 1648 (10 years).The Red Fort was originally referred to as "Qila-i-Mubarak" (the blessed fort), because it was the residence of the royal family. The layout of the Red Fort was organised to retain and integrate this site with the Salimgarh Fort. The fortress palace was an important focal point of the medieval city of Shahjahanabad. The planning and aesthetics of the Red Fort represent the zenith of Mughal creativity which prevailed during the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan. This Fort has had many developments added on after its construction by Emperor Shahjahan. The significant phases of development were under Aurangzeb and later Mughal rulers. Important physical changes were carried out in the overall settings of the site after the Indian Mutiny in 1857. After Independence, the site experienced a few changes in terms of addition/alteration to the structures. During the British period the Fort was mainly used as a cantonment and even after Independence, a significant part of the Fort remained under the control of the Indian Army until the year 2003. The Red Fort is an attraction for tourists from around the world.

    Address: Old Delhi

    Indian Flag at The Fort. Diwan E Khas ( Hall of private audience!)
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Red Fort - Hayat Bakhsh Bagh

    by MM212 Updated Jun 7, 2010

    Its name, Hayat Bakhsh Bagh, translates to "life-bestowing garden" and it was the imperial garden of the Red Fort. A spacious lawn is bisected by a long water channel, which was fed by a fountain within a richly carved white marble pavilion at one end, and met at the other end by an identical pavilion. In the centre of the garden, the water filled a large pond with a red sandstone pavilion standing in the middle. This pavilion would have been accessible only by boat or a small gondola, but when I visited in March 2009, the pond and water channel were dry. It was left to my imagination to visualise how the Emperors had once seen this garden...

    Address: Red Fort, Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    The red sandstone pavilion & dry pond Hayat Bakhsh Bagh One of the white marble pavilions The dry pond Fountain within the pavilion
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    The Red Fort (Lal Qila)

    by MM212 Updated May 25, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although all of Delhi's many fortresses were built using reddish sandstone, only this one was worthy of being called the Red Fort (Lal Qila). It was commissioned by Emperor Shah Jahan in 1638 who subsequently moved his capital here from Agra and called it Shahjahanabad. This was the seventh iteration of the city of Delhi, which remained the Mughal capital intermittently until 1857 when the British completely extinguished Mughal rule, and up to this point the Red Fort had served as the residence of the Emperor and his court. Shahjahanabad is what is nowadays referred to as Old Delhi, the area west of the Red Fort. After 1857, the British used the Red Fort as a military base and made some modifications, but maintained its opulent pavilions and palaces that have made it the "Versailles" or "Topkapı" of Delhi. In 2007, the Red Fort was added by the UNESCO to the list of World Heritage Sites. Structures within the Fort are described individually further below on this page.

    Address: Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    Lahore Gate of Lal Qila - Mar 09 Red Fort The imposing gate Seen from the interior The Red Fort
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    British Military Barracks

    by MM212 Updated May 24, 2010

    This series of European-style edifices was built by the British after they exiled the Mughal dynasty and took over the Red Fort in 1857. The buildings served as the headquarters and barracks of the British military, and much like the presence of the British soldiers in a Mughal fortress, they were very much out of place amid grand Mughal edifices.

    Address: Red Fort, Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Red Fort - Mumtaz Mahal

    by MM212 Written May 23, 2010

    Located just to the south of the chief wife's palace (Rang Mahal), Mumtaz Mahal is the women's palace and most private quarters. It is nowadays the Museum of Archeology which showcases some Mughal era objects.

    Address: Red Fort, Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    Mumtaz Mahal
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Red Fort - Moti Masjid

    by MM212 Updated May 23, 2010

    A tiny mosque, Moti Masjid was built by Emperor Aurangzeb in 1660 for his own private use. It is an architectural jewel for it is entirely built in white marble, carved with the most beautiful floral designs. Due to its whiteness, it earned the name "Pearl Mosque" (moti = pearl). It is topped by three onion-shaped domes and many small minarets in the form of lotus flowers.

    Address: Red Fort, Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    Moti Masji's minarets - Mar 09 Moti Masjid Onion domes and lotus minarets White marble interior Carved marble
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Red Fort - Naubat Khana

    by MM212 Written May 23, 2010

    One of the first structures one encounters when visiting the interior of the Red Fort, Naubat Khana was the "Drum House". Musicians played music from this pavilion for the Emperor and his guests. It is built of red sandstone and decorated with floral patters and pointed or polyfoil arches.

    Address: Red Fort, Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    Naubat Khana - Mar 09 The other side of Naubat Khana Floral motifs Polyfoil and pointed arches The Drum House
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Red Fort - Diwan-i-Khas

    by MM212 Updated May 23, 2010

    Diwan-i-Khas, which translates to the "Hall of the Private Audience", was where the Mughal Emperor met his closest subjects. It is built of white marble and decorated with exquisite floral motifs. This is one of the most opulent structures in the Red Fort, yet it is said to have been even more luxurious before its entire silver ceiling was stripped and replaced in the 18th century.

    Address: Red Fort, Netaji Subhash Marg, Old Delhi

    Exterior of Diwan-i-Khas Arches of Diwan-i-Khas - Mar 09 The opulence of Diwan-i-Khas - Mar 09
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner

Instant Answers: Delhi

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

8 travelers online now

Comments