Kurama Things to Do

  • Jizo in the Rocks
    Jizo in the Rocks
    by Rabbityama
  • Bridge Along the Trail
    Bridge Along the Trail
    by Rabbityama
  • Candles beneath Kurama-dera
    Candles beneath Kurama-dera
    by mikegr

Most Recent Things to Do in Kurama

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    Mount Kurama

    by Rabbityama Updated Feb 4, 2011

    The mountain is of course famous for Kurama-dera Temple, but it is also believed to one place where tengu live (the big-nosed half-bird, half-human creatures).

    One of the biggest draws to Kurama, though, is its nature. The forest is very serene and absolutely gorgeous in the fall when the leaves are changing colors. Along the trail you'll find a small waterfall, a bridge, and a bamboo grove. One of the highlights is actually a section near Kibune where there are trees that have many of their roots showing above ground. It's interesting and has become one of the trail's most famous parts.

    Kurama's Famous Tree Roots Jizo in the Rocks Bridge Along the Trail Bamboo Grove
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Religious Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Kurama-dera Temple

    by Rabbityama Updated Feb 3, 2011

    Kurama-dera Temple was founded by a monk in 770. Although the temple's main building is up the mountain (near the mid-way point along the path from Kurama to Kifune), it is actually spread out over the mountainside. The temple's gate is actually near Kurama Station, before you reach Yuki Shrine, and the pagoda is at the top of the cablecar. The large tengu statue at the bottom is there because it is said that Yoshitsune meditated and studied martial arts here under the guidance of a tengu (holy creatures that resemble humans and birds, easily recognized by their long noses).

    At the main shrine, there is a scenic overlook of the surrounding areas. You can enter the main hall for 200 yen.

    Address: 1074 Kurama-honmachi

    Phone: 075-741-2003

    Kurama-dera's Hondo Kurama-dera's Pagoda Steps to Kurama-dera Steps to Kurama-dera's Gate Foliage at Kurama-dera
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Yuki Shrine

    by Rabbityama Updated Jan 30, 2011

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    Yuki Shrine is the first shrine you will come across if you enter from Kurama Station. It is famous as the site of the Kurama Fire Festival held on October 22. It was built to protect Kyoto's northern borders from evil spirits that may try to enter during the Momoyama Period in the architectural style of the same name. The huge cedar tree towering above the area is over 800 years old and is considered holy.

    Address: 1073 Kurama-Honmachi

    Phone: 075-741-1670

    Yuki Shrine's Cedar Tree Yuki Shrine Yuki Shrine
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    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Festivals

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    Kifune Shrine

    by Rabbityama Updated Jan 30, 2011

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    Also called Kibune Shrine, this shrine is divided into three parts located within walking distance of one another. The main shrine that you see today is the first of the shrines along the road and the most modern. The most interesting thing here are the fortunes. They are on paper and to see your fortune, you must dip the paper in the water at the shrine and it will then appear!

    The middle shrine is just a bit further up the road. There is mostly forest there today.

    Slightly further down is the upper shrine (Okumiya), and although the modern shrine is viewed as the main shrine today, this is the original, historical Kifune Shrine. It is small, but its history extends 1600 years. The shrine is older than Kyoto and when Kyoto became the capital, offerings were made here by the court. If you want to see the "true" Kifune Shrine then this is where you should go.

    All three parts of the shrine are free to visit.

    Address: 180 Kurama-kibune-cho

    Phone: 075-741-2016

    Website: http://www.kibune.or.jp/jinja/

    Kifune Okumiya Shrine Fabric in Kifune Okumiya Shrine Kifune Okumiya Shrine Steps to Kifune Shrine Kifune Shrine
    Related to:
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    Kurama Onsen

    by Circle88 Written Apr 26, 2010

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    A good idea could be to start the hike from Kibune and finish at Kurama so you can enjoy a hot soak at Kurama Onsen. The view is very nice and the big bath is outdoors with a small indoors. The price is quite high at 1100 yen and I believe I smelled chlorine in the water. Nevertheless a thoroughly enjoyable visit.

    Address: Kurama

    Directions: Up the hill in Kurama.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Spa and Resort

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  • Hiking Kurama Temple : Guide book

    by reikijess Written Aug 23, 2007

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    Hiking Kurama is a beautiful thing to do especially in the fall when the leaves turn in mid November. There are so many great little spots, especially if you have an awareness of chi energy.

    A book recently came out, available on American amazon.com that talks about the mountain extensively, and describes what you will see there. Called Reiki's Birthplace:A guide to Mt Kurama, has information on what you will see site by site, and what deities are present.

    Address: kuramadera

    Directions: hike the mountain

    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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    Experience a natural Sulphur Hot Spring.

    by meimivw Written May 19, 2005

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    This is probably main attraction of the town/village of Kurama. The Hot Spring! For about 1,100 yen, you enjoy the bath. Might be expensive to some but it's one of those things that you should not miss while you're in Japan. Go to the onsen after visiting Kurama temple. After all those hiking up mt. Kurama, I think the bath will be more enjoyable. Overnight accomodation is also available.

    Address: 520 Kurama Honmachi Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 601-1111 Japan

    Directions: Take the free shuttle or just follow the street.

    Phone: 075-741-2131

    Natural Sulphur Spring

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    Walk to the Onsen

    by meimivw Written May 19, 2005

    There is free shuttle to the onsen, but walking will give you a better enjoyment because the onsen is not that far from the station. You get to see, feel, and breathe the fresh air of a japanese countryside. I highly recommend it.

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    Kurama Onsen

    by mikegr Updated Feb 1, 2005

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    What could be better after a brisk walk than a soak in a hot steaming bath. And why not share your bath with your friends!!!!!

    Welcome to Kurama Onsen!

    For the outdoor onsen (rotembero) - when the bus drops you off walk towards the building on the right, up the slope. Buy a ticket from the machine before the manned booth (1100 yen) and hand the ticket to the man - you can also purchase small modesty towels here, although they didn't seem to be getting much use on my last visit. Continue up the stairs and to the changing rooms where you will need 100 yen for the lockers (which is refundable).

    Note that there are seperate facilities for men and women.

    Remember to wash thoroughly before entering the rotembero (there are the outside wash stations on your left as you walk out to the rotembero, however on a chilly day, you may find the indoor wash stations more comfortable - from the change room they are through the door on the right - wish I'd known this on my first visit!), and make sure you have rinsed the soap off - there are signs requesting that visitors only enter the water naked.

    If you are feeling hungry - food is served in the building on the left - they do very good sashimi and tofu sets and the tendon (shrimp and vegetable tempura rice bowl - 1000 yen) is delicious. Prices are about double what you would pay in Osaka.

    Address: Kurama Village

    Directions: From the train station theres a free bus which runs to the onsen (if you miss the bus just turn left into the main road and keep walking - the onsen is on the right). Its interesting to walk through the village so I recommend you do this at least one way

    Day turns to night at Kurama Onsen - Kyoto-fu
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Water Sports
    • Spa and Resort

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    Beneath Kurama-dera (a crypt?)

    by mikegr Written May 24, 2004

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    When you go into the temple, Kurama-dera, don't miss the opportuinity to visit the crypt type place downstairs. There are stairs at both ends of the temple, but they are easy to miss if you are not looking for them.

    It is dimly illuminated with many lanterns hanging from the ceiling, and candles and smells of sandalwood, with hundreds of small urns on shelves.

    Calm and slightly spooky (when the florescent light is not on!) - well worth a look.

    Address: On the walk from Kibune to Kurama

    Directions: please see my Kurama homepage for directions.

    Candles beneath Kurama-dera

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    Dragon spring

    by mikegr Written May 24, 2004

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    Just down the hill from Kurama -dera temple complex, check out this spring sculpted like a dragon. These are commonly seen around Japaense temples, and I love them. this is another one of my favourites.

    A spring down the hill from Kurama-dera

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    Okuno-in Mao-den

    by mikegr Written May 24, 2004

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    Okuno-in Mao-den is the first (and possibly most attractive) of the sub-temples encountered after leaving Kibune, on the walk towards Kurama, about 15-20 minutes up the path.

    The picture is of a structure which you can't approach, as it is behind a wall, however it looks really atmospheric, hidden in the trees.

    Okuno-in Mao-den

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    Kibune-jinja ,Kibune - start of the walk to Kurama

    by mikegr Written May 24, 2004

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    Kibune-jinja shrine in Kibune may not be the most stunning shrine ever, but it is well worth doing the short detour in Kibune village to see it. To get there walk through the large red tori gate on the left in Kibune, and follow the red lanterns up the steps.

    Address: Kibune village

    The roof of kibune-jinja

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    A look at rural living

    by mikegr Written Jul 13, 2004

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    Kurama is a charming village, and walking through the village from the Kibune walk to the onsen will give you the opportunity to see rural life in (slow motion) action.

    Rural Living - Kurama Village

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Kurama Things to Do

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