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Tokyo Asakusa Rickshaw Tour
"Meet your informative guide at Kaminarimon or the nearby Asakusa Station to board the traditional rickshaw a two-passenger wagon pulled by your guide. Tokyo can be overwhelming with a many great interesting sites spread throughout the city. A rickshaw ride with a local guide is the best way to see many essential spots quickly and learn about them without having your face buried in a guidebook. Tour is customizable so discuss possible routes with your guide. Here are four options for Tokyo rickshaw routes.Click on “View Additional Info” for the rickshaw meeting location.""""Climb aboard a traditional Japanese rickshaw for an unforgettable view of the Asakusa district in Tokyo. Your knowledgeable guide will steer you to some of Tokyo’s many iconic sites
From JPY4,500.00
 
Full Day Asakusa Tour with Ninja Experience and Tokyo Skytree
"A ""Ninja"" in feudal Japan was Japanese covert agent with special missions such as espionage and infiltration. On this tour an instructor will help you to practice three basic parts of being a ninja: Sword-handling Concealment methods and Shuriken blade throwing.Then you will walk around souvenir shops along the ""Nakamise"" Street and visit the Sensoji temple and other places of amusement nearby. After roaming the Asakusa area you will head to the Tokyo Skytree which at 634 meters is the world's highest self-standing tower used for broadcasting. There you will get a chance to see the view all around Metropolitan Tokyo. On a clear day
From JPY14,000.00
 
Private Kimono Experience in Asakusa with Tsukiji Fish Market Walking Tour and Water Bus Ride
"Have you ever tried on a kimono? With the rustle of the kimono you can experience this traditional Japanese atmosphere in Asakusa while paying a visit to the Sensoji Temple the oldest temple in Tokyo which was established in the 7th century. Afterwards you will have the chance to go to the Hamarikyu Japanese Garden and experience cruising on the Sumida river. This garden has served many purposes over the course of its history such as the feudal lord's residence and duck-hunting grounds. Here you can have free time to have Japanese tea at the tea house in the garden as an option.Finally you will visit world famous Tsukiji Fish Market that has 400 stores and eateries with hundreds of different types of seafood.Itinerary 1. You will be picked up around 9am from your centrally located Tokyo hotel. 2. Then you and your guide you will stroll around the Asakusa area and visit Sensoji temple
From JPY9,500.00

Asakusa Tips (82)

Asakusa

Tokyo's historic heart, Asakusa is home to the impressive Senso-ji temple, among many other cultural sites. The whole place feels a little bit like Disneyland, with everything done up to preserve an overall historic feel. Asakusa is the place in Tokyo to stock up on all those traditional trinkets and crafts you'll want to bring home. A day in Asakusa should be spent perusing street stalls while nibbling on traditional snacks made fresh in front of you.

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draguza
Sep 09, 2015

Wandering around

Wherever you wandering around there is always cutest thing to see. Some houses in Tokyo is very small but beautiful, typical of lantern decoration. In Asakusa area there are many cafe and bars and here are a lot cheaper to drink than elsewhere.

The thing is, visiting in Tokyo most sign is not translated in English. For foreign visitor it will be hard to understand. But if your not ashamed to ask someone what it is mean, asked especially young people most of them speak English. We have asking a couple of times, and believe me they were very helpful

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shavy
Mar 05, 2015

Covered shopping street in Asakusa

This is another shopping street under roof, here is different than the one outside. The shops are daily open from 9am to 6pm. Asakusa is an old town of Tokyo, this is not really a place for stylish shopping. Well, I didn't come either to shop, but out of curiosity this is a very expensive city for shopping

In this covered shops you will find almost everything, from small to big prices vary. Even though we're not intend to shop, but is nice to be curious about stuff and specially the price. Example we saw a traditional slipper and this 5500 Yen for bigger size which was 42 euro, this is quite a lot. But anyway we're just very curious.

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shavy
Mar 05, 2015

The market street at Asakusa

As I remember we were here on a Sunday afternoon. We're on our way to see Sensoji temple, we know there is a daily market in Asakusa district but we haven't had a chance yet to visit. This is our last day in Tokyo, we took the advantage of visit the place.

But we did not know that can be very crowded on Sunday, is a big market where you found everything, from souvenir to local food. I don't how it is here on the other day, if you can avoid the Sunday if you don't want to get stuck in the crowds

In Japan "Bargain" is never used. So please never ask a discount when buying souvenirs because it's an offense.

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shavy
Mar 05, 2015
 
 
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Hotels Near Asakusa

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1-3-4 Hanakawado, 111-0033
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1-2-1 Asakusa, 111-0032
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2-19-14, Kaminarimon, 111-0034
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2-20-4 Kaminarimon, 111-0034
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2-4-11 Kinshi, 130-0013
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2-33-7 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo Prefecture, 111-0032, Japan
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Shibaraku Statue

The copper sculpture that sits far on the north east of Sensoji Main Hall is the statue. A greatest kabuki actors from the Meiji period. It doesn't look impressive but it plays a roll of history in Japan. It doesn't much around, we're on our way back to the hotel and we saw this green man. As I've looked pretty well to this man he wear this weird costume with some kind of heavy ornaments

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shavy
Mar 03, 2015

Evening Walk in Asakusa

Asakusa, is the terminus of the Metro Ginza line (G19), which is the best way to get into the area, perhaps by connecting from the Yamanote line at Ueno

Our favorite neighborhood in Tokyo's Asakusa. Here's no big neon lights or huge office buildings but a lively class neighborhood where you quickly feel at home. Especially during the evening hours, we could walk through the orange-lit streets, past the hubbub of the restaurants and the silent but eloquent painted shutters

Asakusa is a great place to visit lot’s of traditional shops and restaurants. Even when the shops are closed it’s fun to walk around, because the street lanterns and the temple will be lit up which creates an amazing scenery.

The area is a quiet place when it comes to nighttime. A complete opposite from the hustle and bustle during day. The place is however, although not as trendy as other parts of Tokyo, is by no means dead. In the back alleys, there are entertainment halls showcasing local comedians and even adults theaters, for those interested

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shavy
Feb 23, 2015

Asakusa Nekoen Cat Cafe

I remember doing a random search on unique things to do in Tokyo, and I came across the cat cafe idea while browsing. Luckily, there was one close by to where we had stayed, so this place was perfect! "Neko" is the Japanese word for cat. This cozy little area on the sixth floor of an apartment building houses a few adorable felines within it's walls. I heard this was one of the best cat cafes in Tokyo, and I'm so glad we could come here and experience this unique part of Japanese culture. Perhaps there might be other cat cafes outside of Japan, but of course, remember where the culture comes from!

The cafe opens at 11:00 A.M. The cost, as of 2014, was 800 yen for an hour of cat time.Once you get off on the sixth floor, there is a tiny little space where you can set aside your shoes (don't forget to take them off!) and your coats. Put on your little cat-themed slippers and enter this quaint little area. The owner is really friendly and happy to tell you about her cats. There are snacks and drinks for purchase if you wish, or you can just play with the cats using toys. You can even feed them some treats, like my friend did. There's also manga and other things cat related in this space. The place reminded me of a kindergarten class room for some reason, but that's a good thing, because the atmosphere is cozy and happy. There are lots of little areas the cats can chill in. I even had one come up and sit on my lap! There was a fat cat there that amused me, but the cat that had sat on my lap got all my attention instead!

If you want to escape the hustle and bustle of busy Tokyo, just come here and forget your troubles for a while. Rest your feet and relax here at Asakusa Nekoen. Please remember, no flash photos while here!

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HispanicYob
Nov 03, 2014

Asakusa

When we are in Tokyo, I always like to stay in Asakusa. It is a bit different from other Tokyo districts. It feels more spacious as streets are wider and buildings are shorter. It is at the end of two underground lines so it is not a bad base for travelling around to other districts.

In the past Asakusa was the naughty red-light area of Tokyo, famous for strip clubs and brothels. This is no longer the case. Nowadays in addition to just aimlessly wandering through the streets looking at a variety of shops which still follow traditional crafts (e.g.shoe-making, drum making, plastic-food model making), and passing an assortment of brightly lit restaurants, people come to Asakusa to see its famous temple.

Senso-ji Temple, also called Asakusa Kannon Temple, is the beating heart of Asakusa. Its origins date back a thousand years or so to an incident in which three fishermen are said to have netted a golden statue of the goddess Kannon,the goddess of mercy, and decided to build a shrine to her.

Enter the temple through its massive Thunder Gate and wander along a heaving, stall-lined lane to the main temple building. The stalls here sell all sorts of traditional clothes, snacks, souvenirs and more.

In front of the main temple building there is an enormous cauldron wafting the scent of incense into the air.

Take a peek at the tiny statue of Kannon. Then wander through the temple grounds which contain a five story pagoda and a variety of small Buddhist shrines and traditional gardens.

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IreneMcKay
Jun 23, 2012
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o00o

"T o k y o"
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Bunsch

"Tragedy in Japan"
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dennisKL

"Tokyo"
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Wild_Orchid

"Tokyo - I love this place ! Old, New, & Happening"
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kdoc13

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Asakusa... Historic side of Tokyo

If you are not able to visit Kyoto the mother of temples in japan, then Go to asakusa and you will get little of kyoto's atmosphere. visit the temple Sensoji, it's nice but for sure NOT like those in kyoto, specially considering the landscaping.
their is a lot of souvenier shops and just go out of the temple and head toward the river to take nice photos with the world tallest tower "sky tree".

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hebaemam
May 18, 2012

The Asahi Turd Building

This really is a must see for anyone with a puerile sense of humour. The Asahi beer building is designed to look like a giant beer, the golden beverage with white foam on top. Next to it, the company planned to erect a giant flame sculpture to symbolise their employees' passion to deliver high-quality beer to the Japanese nation. Unfortunately, the architects got the logistics wrong and found that having got the flame up there, they were completely unable to erect it upwards. My Japanese uncle Yasu took one look at it and said (in Japanese), "it looks like a giant turd".

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charlottespencer
Apr 04, 2011

First, run the gauntlet of shops

You know you've gotten to the temple complex when you see the so-called Thunder Gate (Kaminarimon), which is the icon of Asakusa with its massive red lantern. Once past the gate, you're on a shopping street called Nakamise, which leads to the temple's second gate, the Hozomon. I can't imagine how crowded it must be on a sunny day. With all the rain, the several blocks leading to the shrine were crammed with people wielding a dangerous assortment of umbrellas. There is a narrow walkway running between booth after booth of mostly tourist junk, although here and there was a purveyor of slightly better quality goods -- a parasol maker, a sword shop, an emporium where you could spent hundreds of dollars on chopsticks! There are also booths with traditional Japanese snacks (rice crackers, bean-paste cakes). Once on the temple precincts, the commerce doesn't stop; it just changes character. There were seven or eight different vendors of the charms. None of the booths had English explanations (and each of the salespeople whom I asked merely shook their heads), so I just randomly pointed out things that looked interesting. I continue to believe that charms from the individual temples and shrines make much more original (and welcome) mementos for the folks back home.

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Bunsch
Oct 06, 2010

What a intresting place

The main attraction here is the Senso-ji Temple that is presently being renovated, there is no admission price and there is a series of shops that line the pedestrian street leading up to the main temple. The shops itself are one of the few places where you can buy souvenirs to take back home...The best part of Tokyo is that the shop keepers don't hound you like they do in China. The prices are fair, not cheap and not expensive. Also bargainning isn't done in Japan, so the price is the price on it. As for the temple there is a series of building around the main one. As much as it seemed that it's crowded the place is sooo big that you can walk around exploring the other building almost alone, or at least it seemed that way. Highly recommend it... It's one of the top tourist attraction in Tokyo.

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jlanza29
Aug 01, 2010

Things to Do Near Asakusa

Things to Do

Sumida River

Near the Tokyo Sky Tree, the Sumida River (Asakusa subway stop). Asakusa is one of the oldest neighborhoods of Tokyo, but along the Sumida River, the modern architecture made its entry. We staying in...
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Things to Do

Kokugikan (National Sumo Stadium)

No guarantees of course that a tournament will be going while you are in town, but if there is a tournament in progress, it is well worth catching the sumo. There are 6 tournaments a year, 3 of which...
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Things to Do

Edo-Tokyo Museum

Here is a kabuki display from the museum. The Edo museum is one of Tokyo's finest museum detailing the history of the capital city it's early beginnings up to modern times. The museum is designed to...
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Things to Do

Tokyo National Museum

Where would you go if you want to see the National Treasures and Important Cultural Properties of Japan? Start from Tokyo National Museum in Ueno Park. Particularly Main Building specializing Japanese...
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Things to Do

Ueno Park and Zoo

Another view of this unique temple in Ueno Park with its large octagonal temple hall. the temple is set on a island in shinabazu pond in the southern part of the park. Admission is free to this...
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Things to Do

Akihabara

We were in the plane flying into Tokyo and I watched a short travel video on the personal console --- one video showed a girl going to the basement of a red building in Akihabara (which I later found...
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Getting to Asakusa

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Taito-ku

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