Map &
Directions

Hours
mode_edit
Been here?
Rate it
chevron_left
 
chevron_right

Top Tours

 
Private Tokyo Custom Half-Day Tour by Chartered Vehicle
"This is a private tour by a chartered vehicle. Using this service you can charter your vehicle Limousine Van or Bus which is most suitable for your group and visit many attractive sightseeing spots. You don't have to hurry for any other tourist. This tour is only for your group!Tour route is flexible and can be arranged upon your request.Recomme Empress Shoken.- The Imperial PalaceThe Imperial Palace has been the home of Japan's Imperial Family since 1888. It is built on the same location Edo Castle.- AsakusaWhen approaching the temple visitors first enter through the Kaminarimon (Thunder Gate) the outer gate of the Sensoji and one of the most popular sights of traditional Tokyo."
From JPY45,454.00
 
Private Tokyo Custom Full-Day Tour by Chartered Vehicle
"The ultimate tour of Tokyo! You can see all of the interesting places in Tokyo area. The capital Tokyo has the beautiful contrast between metropolitan skyscrapers and traditional culturre!Tour route can be arranged upon your request.R visitors first enter through the Kaminarimon (Thunder Gate) the outer gate of the Sensoji and one of the most popular sights of traditional Tokyo.Option: (We will be able to arrange an custom-made itinerary for you. Please inform us at least 2 weeks in advance. )- Edo Tokyo MuseumPreserves the historical heritage of Edo-Tokyo displaying the original town with their lifestyle and culture of all eras. (Closed on every Mondays)- Tokyo Sky TreeThe tallest tower in the world (634m) has just opened on May 22 2012. The landscape from the top is outstanding.- Odaiba areaRainbow Bridge
From JPY89,286.00
 
1-Day Tokyo Bus Tour
"During your 8.5-hour tour in an air-conditioned coach you will have the chance to experience a great number of must-see landmarks in Tokyo such as the Imperial Palace Senso-ji Temple in Asakusa Tsukiji Fish Market and a Tokyo Bay Cruise. A fluent English-speaking tour assistant will escort you and the coach also has an audio guide in English Spanish
From JPY8,000.00

Meiji-Jingu Shrine Tips (57)

Visit the Meiji Shrine (Meiji-jingu)

The Meiji Shrine is probably the best example of a Shinto Shrine in Tokyo. Like most things in Tokyo, it had to be reconstructed after the World War II bombings, but it still retains that old Japan feel. That's probably because everything, including the huge torii gate, is constructed out of cypress in a city where almost everything else is concrete or metal.
...The shrine was constructed in 1920 to honor the Emperor Meiji, under whom power was centralized for the first time in centuries. Before Emperor Meiji, the emperor reigned in Kyoto while the real power was held by warlords or Samaurai in Kamakura or Edo (present day Tokyo). After the shock of Commadore Perry's Black Ships, the isolated Japanese ruling class decided they had to do something dramatic to avoid the fate of China so power was restored to the Emperor (the Meiji Restoration) and centralized in Tokyo. Then an amazing westernization and modernization effort to become Asia's pre-eminient power. The construction of this shrine was likely both an effort to commemorate and perpetuate that political revolution.
...The shrine is still important to the spiritual life of Tokyo's people, even if he Emperor no longer has divine power. People still come here to pray, marry, pass their 7th birthday, etc.

AKtravelers's Profile Photo
AKtravelers
Oct 23, 2009

A famous shrine at the heart of Yoyogi Park

Meiji Jingu is a Shinto shrine located in Yoyogi Park. Shinto is Japan's ancient original religion and it reflects in Japanese life. Shinto has no founder, no holy book and no concept of religious conversion, but Shinto values harmony with nature and virtues such as a sincere heart "Magokoro". This shrine is dedicated to the divine souls of Emperor Meiji and his consort Empress Shoken. After Emperor Meiji passed away in 1912 and Empress Shoken in 1914, Japanese people donated 100000 trees from all over Japan and overseas and they worked voluntarily to create this forest which surrounds the shrine. Thanks to sincere heart of Japanese, the shrine was established on 1 November 1920.

muratkorman's Profile Photo
muratkorman
Aug 29, 2009

Wishing, praying and hoping

At Meiji Jingu Shrine you can purchase the wooden votive plaque call Ema and write wishes and prayers. The written plaques hung on rack wooden board under the wishing tree. The wishes and prayers are written in many languages and you can actually read some of the wishes people written.

I am not sure the exact cost, I think it cost around 500 yen for adult and 200 yen for children. I didn’t get to make a wish.

fachd's Profile Photo
fachd
Jun 07, 2009

Torii gates are significant important to Shinto's

The Torii (gates) are usually made from wood. The large Torii gate at Meiji Shrine are built from 1,700 year-old cypress trees and imported from Taiwan.

The Torii gates are very important to Japanese people who are practising Shinto’s. The significant of the Torii gates to the Shinto’s followers is that they must pass under the torii gate. Passing under the gate is to purify the worshippers' hearts and minds before praying to the Kami (Shinto’s gods or spirits). Shinto’s are Japan's major religion alongside Buddhism. The meaning of Shinto is the way of the gods. The Torii gate at Meji Jingu Shrine is decorated with plaque and belongs to Ryobu Shinto which has Buddhism influenced. As for pure Shinto the Torii gates are plain.

fachd's Profile Photo
fachd
Jun 07, 2009
 
 
Sponsored Listings

Hotels Near Tokyo

Hotels
1-1-1 Marunouchi, 100-0005
Show Prices
Hotels
1-1 Hayabusacho, 102-0092
Show Prices
Hotels
23-1 Ichiban-cho, Chiyoda, Tokyo Prefecture, 102 0082, Japan
Show Prices
Hotels
1-4-1 Otemachi, 100-0004
Show Prices
Hotels
1-11-35 Nagatacho, 100-0014
Show Prices
Hotels
2-4-3 Hirakawacho, 102-0093
Show Prices

Important historical notice

Provenance of the Bourgogne Wine for Consecration at Meiji Jingu
"By gaining the good and rejecting what is wrong, it is our desire that we'll compare favourable with other lands abroad"... poem by Emperor Meiji

The Meiji period was an enlightened period during which a policy of "Japanese Spirit and Western Knowledge" was adopted, to learn from the best of Western culture and civilization while keeping Japan's age-old spirit and revered traditions. Emperor Meiji led the way in promoting modernization by embracing many features of western culture in his personal life, such as shearing his topknot and donning western attire, and in many other aspects of daily living. Among these departures, His Majesty set an example by taking western food and in particular by enjoying wine with it.

The barrels of wine to be consecrated at Meji Jingu have been offered by the celebrated wineries of Bourgogne in France on the initiative of Mr. Yasuhiko Sata, Representative, Hourse of Burgundy in Tokyo, Honorary Citizen of Bourgogne and owner of the Chateau de Chailly Hotel-Golf. Profound gratitude is due to the winemakers who have so generously contributed to this precious gift to be consecrated here to the spirit of world peave and amity, with the earnest prayer that France and Japan will enjoy many more fruitful years and friendship.

fachd's Profile Photo
fachd
Jun 06, 2009

Tranquillity

Meiji Shrine was built dedicated to Emperor Meiji and his wife Empress Shoken for the Japanese people to pay respects and to enshrine their soul. He was the first emperor of modern Japan. He transformed feudal Japan to modern state and joined the world powers. Meiji Shrine was destroyed during Second World War and rebuilt in 1958.

Meiji Shrine was our first introduction to Tokyo. It is a popular tourist destination and visited by many as spiritual, recreation and relaxation. The area is large (175 acres) and it can take few hours to observe the shrine. They are many aspects to see and to understand.

Meiji Shrine is surrounded by forest with many different varieties of trees (365 different species). The trees were donated by people from all over Japan.

fachd's Profile Photo
fachd
Jun 06, 2009

Not to be confused with the garden!

We wanted to experience a little traditional Japanese culture in our short time in Tokyo and thought best to do it at the Meiji Jingu shrine. We ended up paying to get into the garden which in my opinion was a bit of a waste of time and money when the shrine we wanted to see was round the corner and free.

Its a fairly peaceful area but we didn't spend too long here as it was pouring with rain.

clueless83's Profile Photo
clueless83
May 05, 2009

Meiji Jingu Garden

We thought that while in Tokyo it would be nice to visit one shrine so as we were planning on going to Harajuku we decided that the Meiji Jingu would be ideal. As we walked into the area we saw an entrance on our left and a little hut selling tickets. We bought two tickets for the garden and proceeded to walk about looking for the shrine. We walked and looked and got lost. No shrine. We later found out that the shrine wasn't in the garden, it was straight on round the corner, not left as we had gone.

If you like gardens you might like the Meiji Jingu, but I personally found walking around in the rain a waste of our precious time in Tokyo. We can't read or speak Japanese so ended up wandering round in circles trying to find something that wasn't there in the first place!

clueless83's Profile Photo
clueless83
May 05, 2009
o00o's Profile Photo

o00o

"T o k y o"
View Member
Bunsch's Profile Photo

Bunsch

"Tragedy in Japan"
View Member
dennisKL's Profile Photo

dennisKL

"Tokyo"
View Member
Wild_Orchid's Profile Photo

Wild_Orchid

"Tokyo - I love this place ! Old, New, & Happening"
View Member
kdoc13's Profile Photo

kdoc13

"Tokyo"
View Member
 
 

Meiji Shrine - Offering of Prayers

You could spend 500 Yen to get a wooden block, wrote down your prayers and hang it up. Alternatively, you could write your prayers on a piece of paper provided, place it into the envelope and drop it into the box. The latter option is free.

There is a stall outside the shrine which sells little amulets (example: for good luck in examinations, for traffic safety, etc).

chatterley's Profile Photo
chatterley
Dec 24, 2008

Meiji Shrine

The Meiji Shrine is a Shinto shrine, dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shôken. When Emperor Meiji died in 1912 and Empress Shôken in 1914, the Japanese wished to pay their respects to these two influential Japanese figures. Thus, the shrine was built and their souls were enshrined in 1920.

The shrine is located in a large forest, and many people visit the forest and the shrine during the New Year holidays.

chatterley's Profile Photo
chatterley
Dec 24, 2008

historic-religious

It is a man-made but no t originally designed to attract tourist.
This perfect example of Shinto architecture--muted colors and spare lines--was opened in 1920 to commemorate the death of Emperor Meiji in 1912. Surrounded by 72 hectares of shady trees and various Japanese flora of the Meiji Jingu Park, it is one of Japan's most sacred and picturesque shrines. The Imperial Treasury House annex exhibits mementos, including the coronation carriage, of Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken.

kimbee_vergara's Profile Photo
kimbee_vergara
Aug 12, 2008

Meiju Jingu Shrine

The Meiju Jingu Shrine is a Shinto shrine established on 1 Nov 1920. It was built for the Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. The Emperor died in 1912 and 2 years later the Empress died too. To commemorate their virtures, Japanese from all over the country donated 100,000 tress to creat a forest. You will have to take a long walk on pebbles that leads to this sacred place of worship.

At the temple entrance, you will need to rinse your hands at the stone basin at the Temizusha, before entering the temple ground. You may put coins in the offering box, bow twice, clap your hands twice, bow again to pay your respect and make your wish.

www.meijijingu.or.jp/english/index.html

imstress's Profile Photo
imstress
Aug 12, 2008

Things to Do Near Tokyo

Things to Do

Imperial Palace(Kokyo Gaien National Garden)

This is a photo of one the guardhouses that surround the palace grounds. These used to be used to keep the imperial family in splendid isolation maintaining a aurora of deity. Today the grounds are...
View More
Things to Do

Chidorigafuchi

Chidorigafuchi is a section of Second Moat of former Edo Castle characterized by its width exceeding 100 meters, so much so it looks more like a dike pond. The moat is best known as one of the most...
View More
Things to Do

Kitanomaru Park and Budokan

Originally built as the stadium for Martial Arts Events for 1964 Olympics, the stadium is often the very reason Tokyo tourists visit this park. Budokan is better known as the venue for the concerts...
View More
Things to Do

Science Museum (Kagaku-gijutsu-kan)

Science Museum, also known as Kagaku-gijutsu-kan (literally the museum of science and technology) is one of the most popular hands-on science and technology museums targeted for children. It is...
View More
Things to Do

National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo Crafts Gallery

Also known as Kogeikan, this detached gallery of National Museum of Modern Art, about 400 meters west of the main building is one of the rare architectural properties in Tokyo which survived the...
View More
Things to Do

Wadakura Fountain Park

Wadakura Fountain Park is located at the far corner of Kokyo Gaien National Garden and east of Imperial Palace East Gardens. It is noted for the fountain show which has the fixed pattern according to...
View More

Getting to Tokyo

Address

Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

Hours

We don't yet have hours for this Things to Do. Help us improve our info!

Map