Meiji-Jingu Shrine, Tokyo

56 Reviews

Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku
  • No car entries, taking creatures or plants allowed
    No car entries, taking creatures or...
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    Ema Tablets for Wishes
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    Lawn Area At the North
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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Important historical notice

    by fachd Written Jun 6, 2009

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    Provenance of the Bourgogne Wine for Consecration at Meiji Jingu
    "By gaining the good and rejecting what is wrong, it is our desire that we'll compare favourable with other lands abroad"... poem by Emperor Meiji

    The Meiji period was an enlightened period during which a policy of "Japanese Spirit and Western Knowledge" was adopted, to learn from the best of Western culture and civilization while keeping Japan's age-old spirit and revered traditions. Emperor Meiji led the way in promoting modernization by embracing many features of western culture in his personal life, such as shearing his topknot and donning western attire, and in many other aspects of daily living. Among these departures, His Majesty set an example by taking western food and in particular by enjoying wine with it.

    The barrels of wine to be consecrated at Meji Jingu have been offered by the celebrated wineries of Bourgogne in France on the initiative of Mr. Yasuhiko Sata, Representative, Hourse of Burgundy in Tokyo, Honorary Citizen of Bourgogne and owner of the Chateau de Chailly Hotel-Golf. Profound gratitude is due to the winemakers who have so generously contributed to this precious gift to be consecrated here to the spirit of world peave and amity, with the earnest prayer that France and Japan will enjoy many more fruitful years and friendship.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Tranquillity

    by fachd Written Jun 6, 2009

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    Meiji Shrine was built dedicated to Emperor Meiji and his wife Empress Shoken for the Japanese people to pay respects and to enshrine their soul. He was the first emperor of modern Japan. He transformed feudal Japan to modern state and joined the world powers. Meiji Shrine was destroyed during Second World War and rebuilt in 1958.

    Meiji Shrine was our first introduction to Tokyo. It is a popular tourist destination and visited by many as spiritual, recreation and relaxation. The area is large (175 acres) and it can take few hours to observe the shrine. They are many aspects to see and to understand.

    Meiji Shrine is surrounded by forest with many different varieties of trees (365 different species). The trees were donated by people from all over Japan.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE. Get off at Harajuku station JR line and it's a short walk to the shrine. It is located in a wooded park area next to Yoyogi Park.

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

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  • clueless83's Profile Photo

    Not to be confused with the garden!

    by clueless83 Written May 5, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We wanted to experience a little traditional Japanese culture in our short time in Tokyo and thought best to do it at the Meiji Jingu shrine. We ended up paying to get into the garden which in my opinion was a bit of a waste of time and money when the shrine we wanted to see was round the corner and free.

    Its a fairly peaceful area but we didn't spend too long here as it was pouring with rain.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

    Gateway to the shrine Meiji Jingu Shrine
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  • clueless83's Profile Photo

    Meiji Jingu Garden

    by clueless83 Written May 5, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We thought that while in Tokyo it would be nice to visit one shrine so as we were planning on going to Harajuku we decided that the Meiji Jingu would be ideal. As we walked into the area we saw an entrance on our left and a little hut selling tickets. We bought two tickets for the garden and proceeded to walk about looking for the shrine. We walked and looked and got lost. No shrine. We later found out that the shrine wasn't in the garden, it was straight on round the corner, not left as we had gone.

    If you like gardens you might like the Meiji Jingu, but I personally found walking around in the rain a waste of our precious time in Tokyo. We can't read or speak Japanese so ended up wandering round in circles trying to find something that wasn't there in the first place!

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

    Don't be fooled by the smile, he's not happy!
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  • chatterley's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine - Offering of Prayers

    by chatterley Written Dec 24, 2008

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    You could spend 500 Yen to get a wooden block, wrote down your prayers and hang it up. Alternatively, you could write your prayers on a piece of paper provided, place it into the envelope and drop it into the box. The latter option is free.

    There is a stall outside the shrine which sells little amulets (example: for good luck in examinations, for traffic safety, etc).

    Offering prayers at the Shrine

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  • chatterley's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine

    by chatterley Written Dec 24, 2008

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    The Meiji Shrine is a Shinto shrine, dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shôken. When Emperor Meiji died in 1912 and Empress Shôken in 1914, the Japanese wished to pay their respects to these two influential Japanese figures. Thus, the shrine was built and their souls were enshrined in 1920.

    The shrine is located in a large forest, and many people visit the forest and the shrine during the New Year holidays.

    Directions: 3-minute walk from Harajuku Station

    Meiji Shrine

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  • kimbee_vergara's Profile Photo

    historic-religious

    by kimbee_vergara Updated Aug 12, 2008

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    It is a man-made but no t originally designed to attract tourist.
    This perfect example of Shinto architecture--muted colors and spare lines--was opened in 1920 to commemorate the death of Emperor Meiji in 1912. Surrounded by 72 hectares of shady trees and various Japanese flora of the Meiji Jingu Park, it is one of Japan's most sacred and picturesque shrines. The Imperial Treasury House annex exhibits mementos, including the coronation carriage, of Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

    the shrine another pic of the shrine people who goes to this place
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  • imstress's Profile Photo

    Meiju Jingu Shrine

    by imstress Written Aug 12, 2008

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    The Meiju Jingu Shrine is a Shinto shrine established on 1 Nov 1920. It was built for the Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. The Emperor died in 1912 and 2 years later the Empress died too. To commemorate their virtures, Japanese from all over the country donated 100,000 tress to creat a forest. You will have to take a long walk on pebbles that leads to this sacred place of worship.

    At the temple entrance, you will need to rinse your hands at the stone basin at the Temizusha, before entering the temple ground. You may put coins in the offering box, bow twice, clap your hands twice, bow again to pay your respect and make your wish.

    www.meijijingu.or.jp/english/index.html

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/english/index.html

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  • donpaul77's Profile Photo

    Peace in the city: Meiji Jingu

    by donpaul77 Updated Mar 7, 2008

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    You can find peace and spirituality right in the heart of Tokyo. Mieji Jingu is a tranquil shrine that is only one train stop from Shibuya station. Once you step through the massive torii and onto the grounds, the city will melt away behind you. The expansive, wooded landscape features a large temple, botanical gardens, several museums and a gift shop where you can buy fresh tea and have a snack.

    On a good day, you may see a ceremony in the temple, taiko performance and more. While at the temple, you can submit prayers and purchase charms for anything from long lasting love to traffic safety. Make sure you pay the 500 yen to stroll through the central garden (entrance to the shrine is free, but the gardens cost extra).

    This trip is very inexpensive and easy to do. It really gave me a peaceful feeling. I didn't want to leave.

    Address: Harajuku Station

    Directions: 1 stop from Shibuya station on the JR Yamanote Line

    Kiyomasa Ido (a well in Meiji Jingu)
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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Our first stop

    by cinthya_in_victoria Updated Dec 6, 2007

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    Our first visit during out tour was to Meiji Temple which was constructed by the Emperor and the Empress of Meiji age. The original temple was destroyed in the Second World War and was re-built. It is very beautiful.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

    Temple

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  • salisbury3933's Profile Photo

    Meiji Shrine

    by salisbury3933 Written Jul 26, 2007

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    For a description of the shrine's history, refer to the following link.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiji_Shrine

    It's a popular tourist destination in Tokyo, and a pleasant place to stroll, as it's a reasonable walk from the entrance to the actual shrine itself, and the path is lined by trees, making it an area of green in the concrete jungle that is central Tokyo.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

    The gate at the entrance to Meiji Shrine Meiji Shrine Barrels of sake at Meiji Shrine

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Meiji-jingu

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 17, 2006

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    Meiji-jingu is Tokyo's premier Shinto shrine, a memorial to Emperor Meiji, who died in 1912, and his Empress Shoken, who died in 1914. The shrine divides into two parts, the Outer Garden, between Sendagaya and Shinanomachi stations, contains the Meiji Memorial Picture Gallery and several sporting arenas, including the National Stadium and Jingu Baseball Stadium. The more significant important Inner Garden, beside Harajuku Station, includes the emperor's shrine, the empress's iris gardens, the imperial couple's Treasure House and extensive wooded grounds.

    Meiji-jingu is best visited mid-week when its quiet and the tranquility can be enjoyed at leisure.

    Address: 1-1 Kamizonocho, Yoyoi, Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo 151

    Directions: in Harajuku, next to JR Harajuku Station and Meijijingumae subway station (Chiyoda line).

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  • worldkiwi's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the green space of Yoyogi Park.

    by worldkiwi Written Apr 29, 2006

    Yoyogi Park is a pleasantly leafy space in western Tokyo, between Shinjuku and Shibuya. You can easily reach it on the JR Yamanote line from Harajuku Station.
    In Yoyogi Park is the historically significant, though physically newer, Meiji Shrine. The present day structure was built after the original was burnt to the ground, but it has been carefully constructed to match what was originally there. The walk to the shrine is through dense woodland and the massive Tori (gateways) that you pass through are quite a sight. The shrine itself is a peaceful haven amongst the hurly-burly of Tokyo.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE. Exit from Harajuku station, head south to the bridge over the railway lines (on your right), cross that bridge and you'll see the entrance to Yoyogi Park.

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

    Meiji Shrine, Tokyo.
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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Meiji-Jingu Shrine (4 photos)

    by nicolaitan Written Dec 26, 2005

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    These 4 photographs depict the perimeter of the shrine, the main worship hall (haiden), and the exterior and interior of the main shrine. Under Emporer Meiji, Japan developed a constitution and a parliament, underwent an industrial revolution and formed its first alliance with an outside nation (Great Britain), and defeated China in 1895 and Russia in 1905 in the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars. His memory is so important to modern day Japan that upwards of 3 million people gather at the shrine each New Year.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Meiji Jingu Shrine - main torii (3 Photos)

    by nicolaitan Updated Dec 24, 2005

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    This shrine opened in 1920 has the subdued architectural style and color scheme classical for Shinto architecture. Destroyed during the war, it was rebuilt in the late 1950"s. It is dedicated to the spirit of Emporer Meiji Who took the Japanese throne in 1868 ending centuries of feudal Tokugawa dynasty isolationism. He began the westernization and modernization of the country prior to his death in 1912. The shrine is surrounded by a large beautiful park of the same name, which includes a garden designed by the emporer. The word "jingu" indicates imperial. At each New Year, millions of Japanese come to renew their wishes for happiness and prosperity in the new year. Twice a week ceremonies are held for newborns. Pictured here is the torii at the entrance to the shrine.

    Address: Yoyogi Kamizono-cho, Shibuya-ku

    Directions: JR HARAJUKU / Tokyo Metro JINGU-MAE

    Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/

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