map
Map &
Directions
access_time
Hours
mode_edit
Been here?
Rate it
chevron_left
 
chevron_right

Top Tours

 
Private Half-Day Tour of Ho Chi Minh City
"You will be picked up at your hotel at 8 am and head toward your first site.First stop on your tour will be the Independence Palace/ the Reunification Palace. The palace is symbolic of the end of the Vietnam War during the Fall of Saigon on April 30 1975 when the North Vietnamese Army tank number 843 crashed through the gates of what was at the time the residence of the President of the Republic of Vietnam.Next you will visit the Museum of American War Crimes/ the War Remnants Museum is the most popular museum of Ho Chi Minh City. It gathers a collection of the machinery weapons photos and documentation of Vietnam’s wars.After the Museum
From $37.00
 
Half Day Saigon Morning Tour by Scooters
"It’s time to step out of your comfort zone and hit the road on two wheels with Saigonese to explore the hidden charms of Saigon. We offer a totally different aspect of the city which no other package tour offers. You'll experience Saigon in the morning j and see the local life and more from a completely new perspective.Start the day with a traditional coffee among locals then we’ll ride through small allies and busy bustle streets to visit a colorful flower market and towards the China Town passing through a couple of other interesting markets that sell bike parts & textile materials. We’ll also take you to visit a w and to some of the beautiful landmarks of Saigon such as the Reunification Palace (view from outside) Notre Dame Cathedral and the Old Central Post Office. Seat back and enjoy your ride!""""It’s time to step out of your comfort zone and hit the road on two wheels with Saigonese to explore the hidden charms of Saigon. We offer a totally different aspect of the city which no other package tour offers. You'll experience Saigon in the morning j
From $58.00
 
War Remnants Museum and Cu Chi Tunnels Day Trip from Ho Chi Minh City
"We start the trip by visiting Notre Dame Cathedral the historic Central Post Officefollowed by exploring the Reunification Palaceand the remarkable site of the War Remnants Museum. The museum is active in the thematic research collection storage preservation and display of the material
From $39.00

War Remnants Museum Tips (106)

A new take on the conflict

There are lots of reviews of the War Remnants Museum on here and elsewhere, so I was expecting a particularly harrowing and one-sided affair. It wasn't quite like that, perhaps because I was already interested in military history so had already been horrified by Calley and Medina at My Lai (and had some faith in humanity returned by Thompson, Colburn and Andreotta), had already looked into the disgrace that was Agent Orange, and had already visited many war museums like the resistance museum in Amsterdam. I'll return to these thoughts later.

After paying 15k VND per person, the recommended route takes you to the top floor and the room of 'historical truths' (on reflection, that implies the other rooms aren't), which is a collection of photo displays setting out the history of the country from French colonisation through to the Vietnam war. Requiem is the next room, subtitled "Photo collection of the US aggressive war in Vietnam" which is a disappointing name as it's actually a haunting and thoughtful collection of photos taken by correspondents who were killed or 'disappeared' in the conflict. It seems to use the original captions from whichever agency or journal they were written for, so is arguably the most truthful exhibit; it was certainly my favourite. This room blends into two more which contain photos from Japanese photographers.

On the next floor are perhaps the most difficult exhibitions - the war crimes section containing details on My Lai and other atrocities committed (or alleged to have been, some are unverifiable while others are clear) by Americans and (once) South Koreans, and the Agent Orange room. This, cleverly painted in orange and black, holds photos of genetic defects in children, some now grown up, others more recent, which are probably the result of dioxin poisoning in their parents. It is hard to look at, particularly the glass case of preserved deformed stillborn babies.

The ground floor has propaganda posters from many countries against US involvement, and currently has an exhibition of the north Vietnamese treatment of American prisoners of war - all rather jolly, apparently. There is even a picture of US Senator John McCain smiling, with no mention of how he can't lift his arms above the shoulder due to the torture inflicted on him during his time in captivity.

Outside is the recreation of jail conditions for some political prisoners and those suspected of supporting the north or engaging in terrorist activities. These people were tortured by their South Vietnamese jailers, and the displays here are gruesome. Finally there is a display of captured US jets, helicopters, artillery and boats.

Is the museum one sided? Yes, but I think that is to be expected from a museum formerly called the US atrocity museum (or war crime, depending on translation) - it would be more accurate to revert to this, as that's what it mainly covers. As I said, some of the displays are better at balance than others. There is also no mention of the North Vietnamese massacres and torture, nor is much made of the same committed by the South Vietnamese. Weirdly, very little at all is made of the efforts of the North Vietnamese army or the Viet Cong. I don't think many such museums with bias and omission would last long in the West.

Does this make it a bad museum? I don't think so, provided you have the means and motivation to research the rest of the story, and for most this is possible. The museum is well laid out, and well curated, with a lot of interesting exhibits. I'd certainly recommend a visit for foreigners. On the other hand, I could say that for the people of Vietnam it is a bad museum, reinforcing their indoctrinated views, and not encouraging independent research. For me, it was worthwhile.

Gyppo's Profile Photo
Gyppo
Jun 04, 2016

Be aware of scam taxis waiting outside the museum!

The museum is excellent if one critically keeps in mind that only one side of the coin is shown here. Rooms are modern and with AC and text in English and Vietnamese.
Many tourists come to this museum each day and there are many taxis and motorbikes waiting outside offering their services. There is a criminal taxi driver outside who has a cap that looks like Mailinh but it is not and a fake. You will realize soon that the taxi meter spins and doubles each 15 seconds or so. When I asked the taxi driver he suddenly did not speak English and I asked to stop. Bill was 68.000 VD for a distance I had expected to be 40.000 VD. I paid with a 100.000 VD bill that the driver immediately switched with a 10.000 VD bill and asked me to pay correctly. I was confused and now paid with a 500.000 VD (I did not have any smaller money) and he returned 26.000 VD. When I realized what was going on I started screaming at him to give back the 500.000 VD to me and insulted him. This must have been so unexpected to him that he returned the 500.000VD to me and I left the taxi. He followed me claiming I did not pay but when I got attention with the situation he escaped.
My recommendation: Take photo of license plate and driver and hold the money in your hand so he can revise. Get out the taxi if you feel it is a scam.
I never had bad experience with Vinasun or Mailinh.

EdgarL3
Jul 24, 2015

A lesson to all

Many have stated that this museum represents but one side of the conflict. I beg to differ, as seldomly are the victims of war able to speak out. Today's wars have been sanitized by governments and the press, controlling access to the information, by censoring and preventing dissemination of the resulting carnage.
There is a fundamental truth spoken in this museum : war should never be entered in. It is carried out for profit and greed. It makes no sense and the price in human suffering is always too great. All leaders entering or espousing war should be held accountable and they should suffer the same fate of the innocents who died needlessly.

Ironhillguy
May 23, 2015

Important Historical Museum, But Upsetting

We went to this museum twice. It is an extremely important museum, in my opinion, and one which ought to be seen. However, it evokes strong reaction, and can be upsetting.

What I found upsetting were the photos of the victims of the chemical Agent Orange which the US forces dropped on the jungles of Vietnam to clear the jungles of vegetation. The photos show people with horrific deformities and horrific injury. It is upsetting. It also made me feel very angry. I felt angry at the injustice for the people who were so affected by the chemicals used. That was not a benign chemical. It has devastating effects. It was a weapon.

This museum shows the horrors of the war.

There are other exhibitions, including one showing a typical prison cell. When I peaked in to the cell, I jumped back in fright because the figure of an emaciated prisoner looked so real.

There are also weapons and a tank on site.

There are different buses that go past the museum, if you are not in walking distance.
Bus Route No. 14: BX Eastern - 3/2 - BX West.
Bus Route No. 28: Ben Thanh Market Cho Xuan Thoi Thuong
Bus Route No. 06: Cholon BX - University of Agriculture and Forestry

Admission costs 15.000d/luot/nguoi with discounts offered for some categories of people.

HulaJoy's Profile Photo
HulaJoy
Jan 31, 2015
 
 
Sponsored Listings

Hotels Near War Remnants Museum

Hotels
14 Vo Van Tan Street, District 3, HCMC, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Show Prices
Hotels
204 Nguyen Thi Minh Khai, District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Show Prices
Hotels
1 Le Quy Don, District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Show Prices
Hotels
127 Pasteur Str, Dist 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Show Prices
Hotels
28 Truong Dinh Street, Ben Thanh Ward, District 1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Show Prices
Hotels
19 Vo Van Tan St., District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Show Prices

Historical War Museum : War Remnants Museum

Visited the War Remnants Museum after went to the Reunification Palace, as a part of Ho Chi Minh city tour.
The War Remnants Museum (Vietnamese: Bảo tàng chứng tích chiến tranh) is located at 28 Vo Van Tan, in District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The exhibits inside and outside are primarily from the American -Vietnam stage of war.
Entry fee 15.000 Dong, Opening hours 7.30am-noon & 1.30-5pm.
Time sure flies when we're at this museum , glad that we came early , but its still not enough time to see it all , until we were told to get out on 12.00 noon, when the siren rangs.
Quoted from lonely planet :
This Museum ,once known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes, the War Remnants Museum is consistently popular with Western tourists.
Few museums anywhere drive home so effectively the brutality of war and its many civilian victims. Many of the atrocities documented here were well publicised but rarely do Westerners get to hear the victims of US military action tell their own stories.
While the displays are one-sided, many of the most disturbing photographs illustrating US atrocities are from US sources, including those of the infamous My Lai Massacre.

US armoured vehicles, artillery pieces, bombs and infantry weapons are on display outside. One corner of the grounds is devoted to the notorious French and South Vietnamese prisons on Phu Quoc and Con Son Islands. Artifacts include that most iconic of French appliances, the guillotine, and the notoriously inhumane ‘tiger cages’ used to house Viet Cong (Vietnamese Communists; VC) prisoners.

The ground floor of the museum is devoted to a collection of posters and photographs showing support for the antiwar movement internationally. This somewhat upbeat display provides a counterbalance to the horrors upstairs.

Even those who supported the war are likely to be horrified by the photos of children affected by US bombing and napalming. You’ll also have the rare chance to see some of the experimental weapons used in the war, which were at one time military secrets, such as the flechette , an artillery shell filled with thousands of tiny darts.

Upstairs, look out for the Requiem Exhibition . Compiled by legendary war photographer Tim Page, this striking collection documents the work of photographers killed during the course of the conflict, on both sides, and includes works by Larry Burrows and Robert Capa.

The War Remnants Museum is in the former US Information Service building. Captions are in Vietnamese and English.
This Museum told us the true story behind the war, a difference between ideology ,at least in the Vietnamese point of view , this war or any war in this planet , should not happen again.

ErwinKoo's Profile Photo
ErwinKoo
May 03, 2014

The War Remnants Museum

The Vietnam War is famous and we were interested in learning more about it. This museum is very interesting, but also very sad with many horrific photos of the victims of the war. The museum mainly focuses on the war with the Americans with a few things related to the war against the French. The museum has 8 rooms. Outside in a courtyard there are tanks and helicopters and other remnants from the war.

A word of warning some of the photos in the museum especially of victims of agent orange and napalm are very distressing.

IreneMcKay's Profile Photo
IreneMcKay
Jul 07, 2013

War Remnant Museum

If there is one thing I didn't enjoy the most in my travel in Vietnam, that is visiting the War remnant museum. It was really devastating to see the effects of war to people then and now.

The museum has 3 levels showing pictures during the war. Entrance fee is 15.000 dong, There are memorabilia stores inside the museum but the price here are twice as much than those on Ben Than and Pham Ngu Lao.

heydelin's Profile Photo
heydelin
May 10, 2013

War Remnants Museeum- must see attraction

At the enternace you will see many planes, helicopters tanks and guns etc.You will find photos of the war and its aftermath on levels 2 and 3. I don't recommend to study theses photos you will find it distressing. The prison display outside is also disturbing.

larrymastro's Profile Photo
larrymastro
Mar 28, 2013

Top 5 Ho Chi Minh City Writers

bpacker's Profile Photo

bpacker

"Saigon Saigon !"
View Member
JonnyVN's Profile Photo

JonnyVN

"Home"
View Member

xuessium

"IMPREXXION: HO CHI MINH CITY"
View Member
SirRichard's Profile Photo

SirRichard

"Former Saigon"
View Member
balhannah's Profile Photo

balhannah

"Ho Chi Minh City 29/3/08 - 3/4/08"
View Member
 
 

WAR REMNANTS MUSEUM

The War Remnants museum is dedicated to the Vietnam War. It gives the full history of the war over three Floors. The museum was previously known as Museum of American War crimes. I thought it handled the war very well and although some of the pictures on the walls were hard to look at the more we understand what happened and hopefully prevent it from happening in the future.
A part of the exhibits were dedicated to press and photographers who were also killed during the war.
Helicopters and armoured trucks are on display outside in the grounds.
Outside the museum people that were affected by the Agent Orange used by the USA during the war sell books and postcards.

OPENING HOURS
7.30-12.00 & 1.30-5.00

alyf1961's Profile Photo
alyf1961
Oct 11, 2012

War Remnants Museum

Sometimes it’s good to know something about a bit of history of the country you are visiting… and so we ended up here in the War Remnants Museum. From the Reunification Palace, you can walk about a few minutes to get here.

Entrance fee is 2USD; children below 12 yrs old are free.
Opening hours: Daily at 730-12nn, 130pm-5pm

We got there at 1120am and after buying tickets, one of the staffs said that they’ll be close for lunch at 12nn so we hurried to go inside. We were welcome in the entrance by these big aircrafts and tank. The building has 3 floors, on the ground floor is all about the news of the war, rallies, peace and all that, the 1st floor contains the Agent orange victims (the effect of war against the locals) and the 2nd floor contains the photo contributions of the deceased and missing photographers during the war.

From the exhibited remnants I saw, I believe that what happened during those times are lessons to be learned. It’s not easy to look back on the very bad situations that took place but when you see the purpose of it, it means that we have to move on and help each other; after all it’s the reason why we are here on earth.

theguardianangel's Profile Photo
theguardianangel
Oct 09, 2012

Third Floor Pavilions (Requiem)

This is the FINAL part of the War Remnants Museum tips with more pictures of the third floor pavilions, particularly on the Requiem Pavilion, a compilation of assorted photos. photo montage, iconic photos of the vietnam war by the international photographers, both who lived and died during the war.

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

The Third Level of the Building Houses Historical Truths Pavilion (A room containing photographs, propaganda, news clippings, and signboards geared toward showing the wrongdoings of the U.S. government in the 1960s and 1970s.). Requiem Pavilion (A powerful collection of photographs taken by 134 international journalists who were killed during the Vietnam War),
Vestiges of War Crimes Pavilion (Another room heavily dosed with propaganda showing the mistreatment of civilians during the war) and the Vietnam Post War Recovery Pavilion.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

Third Floor Pavilions (Historical Truths Pavilion)

This is the EIGHT part of the War Remnants Museum tips with more pictures of the third floor pavilions, particularly on the Historical Truths Pavilions as told by the Victorious North Vietnamese Regime (validating the Winston Churchill idiom, saying History is written by the victors)

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

The Third Level of the Building Houses Historical Truths Pavilion (A room containing photographs, propaganda, news clippings, and signboards geared toward showing the wrongdoings of the U.S. government in the 1960s and 1970s.). Requiem Pavilion (A powerful collection of photographs taken by 134 international journalists who were killed during the Vietnam War),
Vestiges of War Crimes Pavilion (Another room heavily dosed with propaganda showing the mistreatment of civilians during the war) and the Vietnam Post War Recovery Pavilion.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

Things to Do Near War Remnants Museum

Things to Do

Dong Khoi Street

A lively street in the heart of Ho Chi Minh. It became famous during French rule when it was known as the Rue Catinat, with five star hotels, posh restaurants and elegant boutiques standing next to...
View More
Things to Do

Cafe Zoom

WHEN YOU WALK AROUND SAIGON YOU REALLY CANT HELP BUT NOTICE THAT THERE IS QUITE A FEW MOTORBIKES IN THIS BUZZING CITY.. THREE MILLION OR THERE ABOUTS !! THE MOTORBIKES ZOOMING AROUND THE CITY IS A...
View More
Things to Do

Diamond Plaza

Not exactly a classic Saigon landmark, but it's a favorite with expats. Inside is a mall that's indistinguishable from an American mall, until you look closely at the products on the shelves. Upstairs...
View More
Things to Do

Chinatown

Temple in Cholon (Chinatown). Thien Hau, the lady of the sea is known as Matzu in China and is the chief diety of this temple which sits in the Chinatown of Saigon near the benh thanh market area in...
View More
Things to Do

Cholon Mosque

The Cholon Mosque in Saigon's Chinatown is representative of the city's small Malaysian and Indonesian Muslim communities. Built in 1932, the blue and white house of worship is an island of simplistic...
View More
Things to Do

Fito Museum of traditional Vietnamese medicine

While I confess I'm in the Minchin school when it comes to 'alternative' medicine, the Fito Museum of traditional Vietnamese medicine is worth a trip away from the centre. Set over four floors of an...
View More

Getting to War Remnants Museum

Address

28 Vo Van Tan , Ward 6 , District 3

Hours

We don't yet have hours for this Things to Do. Help us improve our info!

Map