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Top Tours

 
Private Half-Day Tour of Ho Chi Minh City
"You will be picked up at your hotel at 8 am and head toward your first site.First stop on your tour will be the Independence Palace/ the Reunification Palace. The palace is symbolic of the end of the Vietnam War during the Fall of Saigon on April 30 1975 when the North Vietnamese Army tank number 843 crashed through the gates of what was at the time the residence of the President of the Republic of Vietnam.Next you will visit the Museum of American War Crimes/ the War Remnants Museum is the most popular museum of Ho Chi Minh City. It gathers a collection of the machinery weapons photos and documentation of Vietnam’s wars.After the Museum
From $37.00
 
Half Day Saigon Morning Tour by Scooters
"It’s time to step out of your comfort zone and hit the road on two wheels with Saigonese to explore the hidden charms of Saigon. We offer a totally different aspect of the city which no other package tour offers. You'll experience Saigon in the morning j and see the local life and more from a completely new perspective.Start the day with a traditional coffee among locals then we’ll ride through small allies and busy bustle streets to visit a colorful flower market and towards the China Town passing through a couple of other interesting markets that sell bike parts & textile materials. We’ll also take you to visit a w and to some of the beautiful landmarks of Saigon such as the Reunification Palace (view from outside) Notre Dame Cathedral and the Old Central Post Office. Seat back and enjoy your ride!""""It’s time to step out of your comfort zone and hit the road on two wheels with Saigonese to explore the hidden charms of Saigon. We offer a totally different aspect of the city which no other package tour offers. You'll experience Saigon in the morning j
From $58.00
 
War Remnants Museum and Cu Chi Tunnels Day Trip from Ho Chi Minh City
"We start the trip by visiting Notre Dame Cathedral the historic Central Post Officefollowed by exploring the Reunification Palaceand the remarkable site of the War Remnants Museum. The museum is active in the thematic research collection storage preservation and display of the material
From $39.00

War Remnants Museum Tips (106)

Second Floor Pavilions ( Agent Orange )

This is the Seventh part of the War Remnants Museum tips with more pictures of the second floor pavilions, particularly on the Agent Orange Effects Pavilion.

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

The SECOND Level of the Building Houses The Aggression War Crimes Pavilion and the Agent Orange Aftermath Pavilion, where photos and documentaries of the victims of Agent Orange and other assorted "horrors" of the was is featured plus several unborn fetuses with deformities due to agent orange.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

Second Floor Pavilions (Agression War Crimes)

This is the Sixth part of the War Remnants Museum tips with more pictures of the second floor pavilions.

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

The SECOND Level of the Building Houses The Aggression War Crimes Pavilion and the Agent Orange Aftermath Pavilion, where photos and documentaries of the victims of Agent Orange and other assorted "horrors" of the was is featured plus several unborn fetuses with deformities due to agent orange.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

Pavilions at the First Floor

This will be a multi part tip with more pictures inside the War Remnants Museum.

This is the Fifth part of the tips with pictures First Floor

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

The First Level of the Building Houses The Children's Painting Collection, the International Support for the Vietnamese People Pavilion (mostly communist countries like cuba, china, then soviet union, north korea and prominent western communist leaders), assorted hand held weapons used in the war enclosed in glass panels.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

The Prison System

This will be a multi part tip with more pictures inside the War Remnants Museum.

This is the fourth part of the tips with pictures of the Entrance and tickets at the museum.

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

This pictures is on the mock up of a south vietnamese prison cages and assorted tiger cages and prison cells which houses both regular NVA prisoners of war, NLF (Vietcong) guerillas and political prisoners and pictures of the infamous Prison Island of Con Son near the Mekong Delta.

Operated by the Vietnamese government, the museum was opened in September 1975 as the "The House for Displaying War Crimes of American Imperialism and the Puppet Government [of South Vietnam]." Later it was known as the Museum of American War Crimes, then as the War Crimes Museum until as recently as 1993. Its current name follows liberalization in Vietnam and the normalization of relations with the United States, but the museum does not attempt to be politically balanced.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012
 
 
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History is Written by the Victors: Equipments (2)

This is the third part of my multi tips around the war remnants museum, with more pictures of the assorted captured military equipment from the US Army and the ARVN (Army of the Republic of Vietnam).

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND15,000

The now enlarged yard outside the main building houses assorted military equipment, which include a UH-1 "Huey" helicopter, an F-5A fighter, a BLU-82 "Daisy Cutter" bomb, M48 Patton tank, an A-1 Skyraider attack bomber, and an A-37 Dragonfly attack bomber. Several display aircraft (F-5, A-37) have non-standard markings indicating "U.S. Air Force," but are in fact former South Vietnamese Air Force (VNAF) aircraft. You can take pictures and videos of the equipments on display.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

History is Written by the Victors: Equipments (1)

This is the second part of my multi tips around the war remnants museum, with the assorted captured military equipment from the US Army and the ARVN (Army of the Republic of Vietnam).

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND15,000

The now enlarged yard outside the main building houses assorted military equipment, which include a UH-1 "Huey" helicopter, an F-5A fighter, a BLU-82 "Daisy Cutter" bomb, M48 Patton tank, an A-1 Skyraider attack bomber, and an A-37 Dragonfly attack bomber. Several display aircraft (F-5, A-37) have non-standard markings indicating "U.S. Air Force," but are in fact former South Vietnamese Air Force (VNAF) aircraft. You can take pictures and videos of the equipments on display.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

History is Written by the Victors! (Entrance)

This will be a multi part tip with more pictures inside the War Remnants Museum.

This is the first part of the tips with pictures of the Entrance and tickets at the museum.

Open daily : from 8am to 11:45am and 1.30pm to 4:45pm
Entry : VND10,000

Operated by the Vietnamese government, the museum was opened in September 1975 as the "The House for Displaying War Crimes of American Imperialism and the Puppet Government [of South Vietnam]." Later it was known as the Museum of American War Crimes, then as the War Crimes Museum until as recently as 1993. Its current name follows liberalization in Vietnam and the normalization of relations with the United States, but the museum does not attempt to be politically balanced.

Its exhibits speak for themselves, a distressing compendium of the horrors of modern warfare. Some of the perpetrators of these horrors are on display in the courtyard outside, including a 28-tonne howitzer, a ghoulish collection of bomb parts, and a renovated Douglas Skyraider plane. A series of halls present a grisly portfolio of photographs of mutilation, napalm burns and torture. One gallery details the effects of the 75 million litres of defoliant sprays dumped across the country, including hideously malformed foetuses preserved in pickling jars; another looks at international opposition to the war as well as the American peace movement. The museum rounds off with a grisly mock-up of the tiger cages, the prison cells of Con Son Island. There's a water puppetry theatre (daily 9-11am & 2-4pm; $2) opposite the souvenir shop. A minimum of five people are required for a performance.

The museum is effectively a propaganda museum for the Vietnamese Communist regime, as it almost exclusively displays exhibits that are highly critical of the South Vietnamese and American war efforts during the Vietnam War, while neglecting to exhibit anything critical of the North Vietnamese or Viet Cong's war effort or atrocities, for example of the Hue Massacre, the Dak Son Massacre and the Chau Doc massacre, the many land mines scattered across rural southern Vietnam that still lay undentonated often injuring rural villagers (particularly children) today, the brutal treatment of American Prisoners of War (POWs) between 1964 and 1973, and the brutal treatment of political prisoners in labor camps (reeducation camps) run by the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong during and after the war.

The fact that the War Remnants Museum used to be known as the Museum of Chinese and American War Crimes is a good indication as to who the Vietnamese have chosen to portray as the bad guys in this exhibit. Although the recent name change will avoid offending Chinese and American tourists, the pamphlets passed out at the entrance pull no punches, warning stoically, "Some pictures of U.S. imperialists' aggressive war crimes in Vietnam."

machomikemd's Profile Photo
machomikemd
Jul 02, 2012

Shame and Sorrow on Full Display

The War Remnants Museum is a horrifying place to visit. The atrocities of a shameful war are on full display here with uncensored photos of carnage and grief. The museum brillantly and sadly gives a full history of the Vietnam War through relics and photo and is laid catergorically floor by floor. The 2nd floor specifically chronicles the atrocities committed by American soldiers during the war and shows a timeline with word and photos of exactly how terrible these events were for the Vietanmese.

While many people accuse this museum of Communist propaganda and of having extreme bias, I would argue that the events that are shown are a factual reminder of the horrors of war. Every visitor to Vietnam should spend a few hours at this museum as a reminder of the collateral and many time intentional damage that is done to innocent people because of political wars. Its a humbling and sorrowful tribute to the thousands of men, woman, and children that suffered death and injury and whose pains deserve to be remembered.

Visiting Information

Open Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; the ticketing window closes from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. The last admission to the museum is at 4:30 p.m.

Entrance Cost: 75 cents

Location: 28 Vo Tan Tan, District 3, Ho Chi Minh City
Contact: +84 39302112 or warrmhcm@gmail.com

When to Visit: The War Remnants Museum gets busy in late afternoon as tours to the Cu Chi Tunnels finish there. Avoid the crowds by going earlier in the day.

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wilocrek
Jun 26, 2012

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Just War Remnants Museum

why Vietnamese have to anti American if they came in peace and went with it

history is mostly written by the winners of the conflict i guess it ,too -but i guess it 's just telling you that American is not the best, not the high-grade being. ^^!

I try to think , there was the war and there is the war remnants, - just go inside watch all of this, then go out and make peace for our world

I just hope that war doesn't repeat itself by any countries (in fact, it 's going on)

Minhnguyen13
Dec 06, 2011

The war remnants museum.

the war remnants museum is a museum that is a combination of a display of air crafts from the Vietnam war and a display of many pictures and stories from the Vietnam war that focuses on the american war crimes commited in vietnam.
there are also a couple of prison cells from the war that you can see.
I think a lot of boys of all ages will find all the airplanes and helicopters in the courtyard interesting and if you take your time to ge through all the different pictures and stories inside then you can find some really interesting stories among them.
Some americans will probaply say that it´s too anti american and that might be true, but history is mostly written by the winners of the conflict i guess.

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cachaseiro
Oct 20, 2011

War Remnants Museum

The whole area is an exhibit of the Vietnam war. It has certainly an anti-american theme as it was formerly called the House for Displaying War Crimes of American Imperialism and the Puppet Government. It displays war equipments, tiger cages for Vietnamese POWs, graphic pictures, and other artifacts during Vietnam war.

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schurman23
Oct 01, 2011

VISIT THE WAR REMNANTS MUSEUM

The War Remnants Museum in Saigon is an extremely graphic encounter detailing displayed items in all forms the Ten Thousand days that North Vietnam was at war with either South Vietnam ,the French or The USA and its allies..There are many sections to the Museum and can take a few hours to view. Always being interested in Military History, wherever that I may be travelling I always try and view Miltary Museums..this for me was a museum that I wanted to visit as I had heard so much about it...

There are many different sections that touch on all facets of the wars ..with many detailed Maps ,Photos, with a huge collection of various ,Weapons and Ordinance captured or surrendered in the horrific conflict that it was...Outside the building is a large collection of Military Vehicles,Tanks,Artillery and Helicopters that was either left by the departure of The US forces or they were captured by the North Vietnamese Army.

Photography is allowed inside the Museum and also outside..
The Museum is constantly in a state of reconstruction ,always enlarging and modernising all its activities..

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DennyP
Sep 19, 2011

Things to Do Near War Remnants Museum

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Dong Khoi Street

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Cafe Zoom

WHEN YOU WALK AROUND SAIGON YOU REALLY CANT HELP BUT NOTICE THAT THERE IS QUITE A FEW MOTORBIKES IN THIS BUZZING CITY.. THREE MILLION OR THERE ABOUTS !! THE MOTORBIKES ZOOMING AROUND THE CITY IS A...
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Cholon Mosque

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Fito Museum of traditional Vietnamese medicine

While I confess I'm in the Minchin school when it comes to 'alternative' medicine, the Fito Museum of traditional Vietnamese medicine is worth a trip away from the centre. Set over four floors of an...
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Getting to War Remnants Museum

Address

28 Vo Van Tan , Ward 6 , District 3

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