Port Campbell Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by cjg1
  • Things to Do
    by cjg1
  • Things to Do
    by cjg1

Most Recent Things to Do in Port Campbell

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Bay of Islands

    by Waxbag Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is the beginning section of the Great Ocean Road from the west. This spectacular bay is dotted with island rock stacks that are constantly battered by huge waves even on calm days. There are four viewing platforms and 1.8kms of walking trails. Notice the water filled sink holes along the trails. They contribute to the engineering of future islands. Easy access from the Great Ocean Road. The nearest town is Petersborough but Port Cambell may make a more suitable base.

    See video at The Great Ocean Road

    Bay of Islands Bay of Islands
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    The Grotto

    by Waxbag Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is a classic example of the erosional forces of sink holes. The Grotto was created when multiple pools wore away and dissolved the limestone below it until they met creating a natural arch. Easy access from the Great Ocean Road by paved areas and stairways.

    See video at The Great Ocean Road

    The Grotto
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  • The GOR: The beaches

    by xuessium Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    TORQUAY
    22km from Geelong (GL), both tours drove passed this seaside town without a stop. The beach here is popular with families. It is also a Fishermans Beach where you will find boating, sailing & windsurfing. Lifesavers patrol available during summer.

    BELLS BEACH
    The 1st stop with Gowest Tours is Bells Beach, 30km from GL, for a 20 mins toilet stop.

    Bells Beach is a world-famous surf beach. It is a venue for the world surfing titles: Cliff-flanked sandy beach with large ocean swells. Only for the experienced.

    I arrived on a bright and sunny but windy morning and standing on the cliff-face, I could see surfers out on the brownish-hue beach, challenging the elements. Amazing stuff!

    The toilets here are amazing: came highly decorated with aboriginal motiffs. A sight to behold as well!

    ANGLESEA
    37km from GL, this is a 0.5 hour stop with the Greyhound Tours for morning Billy Tea & Lamington cakes. Truth be told, the site of stoppage is not next to the beach but for folks who wishes to know, Anglesea has a popular beach which is excellent for swimming and surfing. Large vegetation-covered sand dunes protect the beach. Lifesavers patrol available during summer.

    LORNE
    This was an unexpected stop for 40 mins with Gowest Tours as my coach ran into engine trouble. I relished the chance to stretch my legs and to enjoy the spectacular scenary. Lorne is one the most popular resort towns on the GOR. Plenty of beautiful holidaying houses littered the road. There is a wide sandy beach on Loutit Bay with gentle surf and is safe for swimming and surfing. Again there are lifesavers patrol during summer. Lorne is 65km from GL.

    APOLLO BAY
    The last major beach is at Apollo Bay, 105km from GL for the lunch stop.

    It is a wide crescent-shaped sandy beach. The protected waters make it popular with families. There are lifesavers patrol in summer.

    I spent about 30 mins on the beach (since I had to wait for my fish & chips anyway) on my first foray. The crescent shaped bay makes for great photography.

    Directions: South East coast of Victoria

    FunkyToilets@BellsBeach
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  • The GOR: Muttonbird Island & Lord Ard Gorge

    by xuessium Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Shipwreck Coast takes its name for the many ships wrecked on this treacherous stretch.

    Lord Ard Gorge is perhaps most famous for a shipwreck story which happened at this spot almost 120 yrs ago. (I even has the fortune of sitting through an Australian movie made on the topic while travelling with Greyhound tours)

    In summary: 52 people died after the sailing ship, "Loch Ard", rammed into the sheer cliffs of Muttonbird Island in stormy weather on 1 June, 1878, just days from completing a three-month voyage from England to Melbourne. 2 survivors, apprentice crewman Tom Pearce and young passenger Eva Carmichael, both 18 years old, made their way into the gorge and onto the beach.

    Tom was washed away while trying to launch the lifeboat while Eva survived, despite being washed into the sea with only a life-belt by grabbing hold of a floating chicken coop.

    Tom rescued Eva from the waves and both made their way to the cave in the cliff behind the beach. They found a case of brandy and drank a bottle.

    Tom climbed the precipitous cliffs and met a party from nearby Glenample homestead. Eva was soon rescued and taken back to the homestead to recuperate.

    You can descend a staircase to the beach and see where Tom and Eva struggled to survive, as well as visit the cave where the teenagers collapsed, exhausted. Take a walk along the headlands and overlook the very spot where the Loch Ard smashed into the sheer cliffs. Storyboards on the paths explain the Loch Ard story. A path also leads to the small cemetery where there is a monument to the Carmichael family and where the few bodies that were recovered are buried.

    Muttonbird Island, sitting near the entrance of the long, narrow gorge, by the way, was the "Sow" in "Sow & The Piglets", the original name of the 12 Apostles. (The piglets were the stacks of the current 12 Apostles)

    Directions: South East coast of Victoria

    MuttonbirdIsland
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  • Zanzibargirl's Profile Photo

    The Twelve Apostles

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Natures way of carving a pretty picture out of the coastline by the sea, the limestone stacks of the Twelve Apostles, also known as "The Sow and piglets" would have to be one of the most photographed sites in Australia, Victoria and the most popular picture of the Great Ocean Roads fantastic coastline. Though well known and touristy, even with people snap happy away the scenery will not dissapoint as these stunning pieces of Rock are definately worth seeing. Especially with the likelyhood of them crumbing every day, as one of them did recently. Mind you, with the constant change in terrain to the coastline, who knows, maybe the ocean will carve a replacement some day too?

    The stone towers of the Twelve Apostles stand as high as 45metres and are the central feature of the Port Campbell National Park. It is natures way of showing us something incredible, as this masterpiece has taken over 20 million years to form a site that today is quite simply a work of art. Beautiful at Sunrise and sunset the Apostles are a great spot for a romantic picture and a must see if you are driving along the Great Ocean Road of Victoria.

    Address: Port Campbell National Park

    Directions: East of Port Campbell follow the signs along The Great Ocean Road

    Twelve Apostles Twelve Apostles Twelve Apostles Twelve Apostles Me and Grant at the Twelve Apostles
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  • Zanzibargirl's Profile Photo

    Loch Ard Gorge

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Being such a windswept rocky outcropped coastline, the oceans off the great ocean road have never been a safe place to sail. Many shipwrecks having occurred along this coastline, part of which is even known as "The Ship Wreck Coast".

    The most famous of these ship wrecks occured here. The Loch Ard Gorge has been named after the incident involving the on-hulled clipper ship that was lost in 1878 while sailing from England to Melbourne called "The Loch Ard".

    The ship was caught in continuous fogs that helped it's captain mistakenly thinking he was some 50 miles out from the treacherous rocks and cliffs. When in reality the Loch Ard was a little closer to land. On June the 1st 1978 the Loch Ard struck Mutton Bird Island to the east of Port Campbell. Attempts to save the 1700-tonne ship failed. Only two people from the 54 passengers and crew survived. A cabin boy called Tom Pearce helped save a young woman Eva Carmichael, who had been washed on wreckage into the cove. Spending the night in a cave Pearce climbed the gorge's cliffs and eventually found help.

    Also located near Loch Ard Gorge the Blow hole is one of the many caves in this area to view. If you come at the right time of day when the tide is right watch the blow hole in action as it throws up huge sprays of water.

    Address: Port Campbell National Park

    Directions: Along the Great Ocean Road near Port Campbell.

    Loch Ard Gorge Plaque for the Survivors Loch Ard Gorge Nearby the Blowhole
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  • Zanzibargirl's Profile Photo

    The Arch

    by Zanzibargirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Arch formation shows just how the pinacles that are the the 12 Apostles were formed. As holes driven into the rock face from water of the coastline develop into caves; the caves form into arches. Eventually as the arch collapses, islands of rock are stranded in the sea forming pinnacles of Limestone which dot the coastline, eventually these too will worn down by the sea. It is amazing to see the work of the ocean and natural erosion along the whole of the Great Ocean Road.

    Address: Port Campbell National Park

    Directions: Just off the Great Ocean Road near Port Campbell

    The Arch The Arch The Arch
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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Port Campbell National Park - Loch Ard Gorge

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    As you venture east on the Great Ocean Road out of Port Campbell on your way to Warrnambool, you will come across the Twelve Apostles, and then move on to Loch Ard Gorge. Loch Ard is named after the ship that made a 3 month journey from England to the Southern Coast of Australia, only to run into Muttonbird Island hours away from completing their journey!

    There are several different paths for you to follow in this portion of the national park, and particularly, you can walk while reading the story of the Loch Ard. You will also learn a little about Tom Pearce and Eva Carmichael, the only survivors of the perilous journey. As the story is reported, the two were on the ship on a very hazy night, when the captain called out to drop the anchors and man the life stations. They were unable to deploy the life stations, and the two 18 yr old kids, Tom and Eva became the only survivors.

    There are a couple other nature trails with gorgeous views, and you can even go down into the gorge where there is a nice beach with the cave that Tom and Eva survived in until they were able to recover and climb the cliff to seek help.

    Muttonbird Island
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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Port Campbell National Park - Bay of Islands

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    As you continue on your journey from Port Campbell to Warrnambool, past Loch Ard Gorge, you come up on the next portion of the Port Campbell National Park, the Bay of Islands. At both of the previous portions of the park, you experience the view of the landscape from a position of height over the landmarks, but when you enter into the walks of the Bay of Islands, you get a whole new perspective. The walls of the coastline almost surround you as you see these larger than life sea walls slowly being carved away in front of your eyes!

    The nature walks were fairly short, so you they are easily available for you and the rest of the thousands of tourists following directly behind you!

    Phone: +61 3 5598 6053

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  • Gypsygirl05's Profile Photo

    Keep going to the Bay of Islands

    by Gypsygirl05 Written Jan 13, 2011

    Bay of Islands is one of the many places in Australia that does not get the credit that it's due. I was impressed with the 12 Apostles, of course, but the Bay of Islands blew me away. I had never heard about them before I found a map in a tourism bureau, but I am so glad I kept going down the Great Ocean Road to see this location. The rocks here have a much more spiky and interesting texture than most of the shipwreck coast, and it was just a really unexpected experience. It's really a shame they're not more well known, though of course that makes it all the more fantastic when you just stumble upon them!

    Address: Just past Peterborough

    Two of the rock formations The sun just happened to peek out
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    London Bridge / London Arch

    by Kathrin_E Updated Apr 24, 2009

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    London Bridge used to be a peninsula with two open arches. One day in 1985, all of a sudden one of the arches collapsed. Two tourists, scared to death, were left standing on the outer part which had become an island. They had to be rescued by a helicopter. Luckily no one had been on top of the collapsing arch at that moment.
    "London Bridge" has been renamed "London Arch" afterwards.

    An example how this coastline is undergoing permanent change.

    I guess it was because of this experience that all those safe and easy platforms, boardwalks and stairs at the viewpoints have been built and access to the crumbling cliffs has been limited.

    Photo 5: A weird scene we observed: two Japanese bridal couples, in full wedding gear, were posing for a photographer in front of the coastal scenery. Two days later we met them again, this time in the Grampians. Did they really spend their whole honeymoon in the company of a photographer and a make-up artist, dressed up in wedding gown resp. black tuxedo, posing in front of different landscape attractions? I cannot believe it. Not my idea of a romantic honeymoon...

    London Bridge... ... now London Arch Coastline near London Bridge Waves keep rolling in... Wedding photos at London Bridge...
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Bird Life on Port Campbell Beach

    by Kathrin_E Updated Apr 22, 2009

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    The little protected beach at the end of the gorge is popular among birds. They allow humans to come rather close, thus an easy option to catch some photos.

    The penguin was all alone on the beach in the afternoon. This was the only wild penguin I saw during the whole trip. We had no idea if this was normal or if the bird was somehow ailing, or if it was a almost-grown chick waiting for the parents (I assumed the latter). After taking the zoom photo from a distance we left it alone in order not to disturb it too much.

    The penguin Seagulls Ferns
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Port Campbell

    by Kathrin_E Written Apr 22, 2009

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    Port Campbell is the largest settlement along the Shipwreck Coast and a good base to explore the National Park. The town is almost as big as the adjacent campground... It has enough shops to stock up on everything you might need.

    Port Campbell is situated at the end of a gorge that forms a protected harbour which can be used by fishing boats. There is even a small beach.

    Port Campbell
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    The Grotto

    by Kathrin_E Written Apr 21, 2009

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    Wind and waves created a hole through these rocks, known as "The Grotto". Stop your car in the parking lot and climb down the stairs. The rock formation can only be seen from the bottom of the stairs.

    The Grotto Cliffs above The Grotto Stairway down to The Grotto
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    The Arch

    by Kathrin_E Written Apr 21, 2009

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    Another amazing rock formation that requires a stop and a bit of walking, in this case also down some stairs to the viewpoint. Wind and waves have gnawed the sandstone and formed a perfect natural arch.

    The Arch The Arch Coastline near The Arch
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