Pemberton Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by balhannah
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by balhannah
  • The Cascades
    The Cascades
    by balhannah

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Pemberton

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    KARRI FOREST EXPLORER DRIVE

    by balhannah Updated Apr 28, 2016

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    Marked as a tourist trail, the Pemberton Karri Forest Explorer Drive is a good way to travel by car and see the majority of Pemberton’s main natural attractions.
    It's an 85km circuit along a narrow and mainly dirt road, a little is sealed road. Remember this is a forest road, so you do need to drive slow and to the conditions of the weather and road. It is a good chance to see a forest close up and to marvel at just how tall and straight these trees grow.

    The Karri Forest Explorer Drive starts just outside Pemberton, but you can join it at several
    points along the way, depending on which way you’re travelling. It's a drive through magnificent tall and straight Karri (Eucalyptus diversicolor) that grows up to 90 m high, making it the tallest tree in Western Australia and one of the tallest in the world.

    By doing the drive we saw many of these sights.
    Gloucester Tree
    Gloucester National Park
    The Cascades
    Dave Evans Bicentennial Tree
    Warren National Park
    Heartbreak and Maiden bush Trails
    Marianne North Tree
    The Warren River
    Beedelup National Park
    Beedelup Falls
    Big Brook State Forest
    Big Brook Dam

    It isn't all trees though, wineries, galleries, restaurants and Cafes are either on the drive or not far from the circuit.

    BEWARE– the drive is along sealed and unsealed roads. Hire vehicle drivers will need to check that their insurance covers them for gravel driving.

    Website: http://www.karrivalley.com.au/images/stories/2008422_karri_forest_explorer_web_version.pdf

    Karri Forest Explorer Drive
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Motorcycle

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    THE CASCADES

    by balhannah Updated Apr 28, 2016

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    Our first stop in Gloucester National park was made at the Cascades where the Lefroy Brook tumbles over a series rocks. Summer time sees a gentle flow, come winter and it's a raging torrent. I was here in Spring and it was running fairly well and was making some interesting patterns in the pools from the foam, quite mesmerizing and a bit like a modern swirling painting.

    In summer this would be a cool, shady place for a picnic, where-as Winter would be quite cool to cold but you would see an impressive sight of the Cascades as it tumbles over the rocks.

    What I found interesting I had never heard of these, is the Brook is home to a population of pouched lampreys (Geotria australis), an eel like creature which attacks their prey with suction mouth and a tongue like a round chainsaw. They migrate from the ocean to the rivers to breed. I didn't see any but you may if you look around the weirs or rapids as they use their sucking mouthparts to scale the slippery rocks. About a year later, the young lampreys migrate downstream and out to the ocean.
    I was happy to read humans weren't on their menu!
    There are many more creatures that inhabit this stream.

    It's a nice area worth popping into for a look and to do the 1.2km walking trail loop that takes you alongside the cascades then up around a hillside through the forest and back down the valley again.

    We came by car by driving south of Pemberton down the Vasse Highway and onto Pemberton Northcliffe Road. Turn left down Glauders Road then another left onto the road leading up to the Cascades car-park. It is signposted.

    DIRECTIONS GPS: -34.4764, 116.03

    The Cascades The Cascades
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Photography

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    MARIANNE NORTH TREE - A LINK TO LONDON

    by balhannah Written Apr 28, 2016

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    I must admit the name Marianne North didn't mean a thing to me, at the same time I wondered why she had a tree named after her.

    Lucky for me there was an Information board with a portrait, information about this lady and painting of the tree named after her of which she was the artist.

    Located in Warren National park near Pemberton is the tall Karri tree with a massive burl growing all the way round a large section of its trunk. Many karri trees have burls but this one is larger than most and is quite unusual for growing in a symmetrical ring around the tree.

    English botanical artist and traveller Marianne North (1830 – 1890) painted this tree, if you wish to see the original painting you need to visit the Marianne North Gallery at Kew Gardens in London.

    Marianne North was quite a famous artist who painted beautifully even though she had no formal training. She loved travelling with her father around the world and painting plants, many of her paintings provide a historical record for many places around the world.

    The Marianne North Gallery at Kew is lined with hundreds of her paintings, most are of landscapes and plants. Recently each of Marianne’s 833 paintings depicting more than 900 species of plants were all restored and conserved.

    The Marianne North Tree is located right by the road side on the gravel Old Vasse Highway, the main road through Warren National Park. Old Vasse Highway is part of both the Karri Forest Explorer Drive and the Warren National Park Scenic Drive. The tree is on the south side of the road, west of the Bicentennial Tree and east of the entrance to the Heartbreak Trail.

    Website: http://www.kew.org/visit-kew-gardens/explore/attractions/marianne-north-gallery

    Burl on Marianne North tree Marianne North tree
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park

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    GREAT FOREST TREES DRIVE

    by balhannah Updated May 6, 2016

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    Another drive we did was tourist route "Great Forest Trees Drive" in Shannon National park.

    The drive is along single lane narrow dirt road through spectacular Karri forest. As we travelled further along the one lane road, we discovered a storm had passed through very recently making the road a little "hairy" in places and we came across branches over the road. We wanted to turn around but couldn't, luckily between the two of us we could move the branches allowing us to squeeze past.

    On this drive we came across a sign telling us to tune into radio station 100FM for information on what we were seeing, a unique idea I hadn't come across before! We stopped at Snake Gully lookout where we walked the wooden boardwalk to the lookout overlooking the valley and a majestic stand of karri trees.
    An information board stated Cockatoos and Parrots lived, fed and nested in the canopy of the forest, and the large, white tailed & white cheeked Baudin's Cockatoo feeds on Marri seeds and the larvae of wood boring insects. The call is a sad wailing "Plee-erk" one we didn't hear.
    The colourful Purple crowned Lorikeet with forest green upperparts and orange forehead and ear patch and a light blue belly, gathers pollen from the blossoms. Listen for a high pitched screeching "zit -zit."

    Our next stop was at Big Tree Gove where another wooden boardwalk weaved amongst the majestic karri trees, some were 85 meters tall!

    We didn't stop at the picnic grounds to stretch our legs as they were muddy after the rain, but on a nice day it would be a pleasant place to stop and take a break or go for a walk along one of the many walking trails, perhaps the popular walk to the National Park Dam.

    The campground was a bit wet for our liking too, shame as the area was nice and had toilets, gas barbecues, hot water showers and was suitable for caravans. Two camping huts are available on a first-come-first served basis. Water and firewood are provided.

    The Shannon Lodge (sleeps up to 6 people) is near the camping area and is available for hire.
    Contact the Parks and Wildlife office in Pemberton for details.

    The trees were magnificent!

    You need to pay National park entry fees to enter this park.
    Camping fees apply at the Shannon campground.
    The fees are used to maintain recreation facilities and visitor services within the park.

    Location 48kms from Pemberton on the Great South Western Highway

    Website: https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/park/shannon

    Great Forest Trees Drive Great Forest Trees Drive Great Forest Trees Drive
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    Warren National Park

    by keeweechic Written Jun 25, 2009

    The Warren National Park is around 12km west of Pemberton and covers around 3,131 hectares of a beautiful Karri forest. Within the park are bushwalking trails such as the Heartbreak Trail, which lead to the Warren River which travels through the park. There is plenty of other things to do such as canoe, bbq, fish for marron and trout or clime the Bicentennial tree. There is a fee for entry to the park.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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    Diamond Tree

    by keeweechic Written Jun 26, 2009

    The Diamond Tree is around 10kms south of Manjimup and around 15kms north of Pemberton in the Warren National Park. This is one of three fire lookout trees in this region.

    Location: South West Hwy

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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    The Smallest of Three

    by keeweechic Written Jun 26, 2009

    The Karri tree stands at 52 metres high and is the smallest of the three lookout trees. The tree has 140 metal pegs which lead up to a wooden tower on the top. It was first pegged in 1940 and operated as a lookout tower for fires from 1941 to 1974.

    Location Diamond Tree South West Hwy

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

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    Jim Fox Walk

    by keeweechic Written Jun 26, 2009

    The Jim Fox Walk is one of several walks in this area. This walk is designed more for the young or energetic because it is a bit of a challenge.

    Location: Diamond Tree, South West Hwy, Pemberton

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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    Dale Evans Bicentennial Tree

    by keeweechic Written Jun 26, 2009

    The Bicentennial tree stands at 70 metres high, the second highest of the fire lookout trees. There is a platform half way up the tree for resting and 360 degree viewing or incase you can’t make it any further.

    Location: Warren National Park

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

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    Who Was Dale Evans

    by keeweechic Written Jun 26, 2009

    I have no idea who Dale Evans is but for some reason this tree was named after him. If you cannot make it to the top there is a halfway platform where you can still enjoy some views.

    Location : Dave Evans Bicentennial Tree, Warren National Park, Pemberton

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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