Mostar Off The Beaten Path

  • Tekke
    Tekke
    by croisbeauty
  • Tekke
    Tekke
    by croisbeauty
  • Tekke
    Tekke
    by croisbeauty

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Mostar

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Scars of war

    by solopes Updated Dec 4, 2014

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    Everywhere we went, the signs of war were present, but, looking carefully, we notice that the ruined buildings should be... the most beautiful in town.

    Noticing that, I think that they started with the common buildings (easier and cheaper to rebuild) and are planning to rebuild the best ones according to their original look. That takes time, study, and... money. But if that is the idea, it gets my approval.

    Mostar - Bosnia and Herzegovina Mostar - Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Tekija

    by croisbeauty Written Aug 26, 2014

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    The Tekke itself was founded sometime in the 16th century and repeatedly thereafter was extended. Its present look dates from 1851 and was built in Baroque style at will of Omer-Pasha Latas.
    During the ex-Yugoslavia time dervishes were expelled and Tekke closed. During the period of the war in Bosnia, 1992-1995, Tekke has suffered severe damage. It was renovated in 2012 and returned to her authentic look.
    As you can see in the pictures, above Tekke is a cave (cum antris) especially appreciated as an important Bogumil's cult place.
    Today dervishes in Tekke studied Sufism or "tessavvuf", an islamic spiritual science that deals with the substance, and its ultimate goal is the purification of the heart.

    Tekke Tekke Tekke Tekke Tekke

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    izvor rijeke Bune

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 26, 2014

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    The source of the Buna river is a strong karstic spring and is the largest in Europe (36m3/sec). The river is ecologically clean and the water is very cold. River itself has a relatively short course and after a few kilometers flows into the River Neretva.
    The area along the river is an oasis of tranquility and natural beauty, and the river itself is an ideal place to gain weight trout.

    the source of Buna Buna river Buna river cascades cascades

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Blagaj

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 26, 2014

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    Bektashi are comparable with the Knights Templar because they were not only religious order but also soldiers. They are known for their tolerance and religious generosity, which is why they were the first by the Ottoman Empire sent to the newly conquered areas in order to spread islam. On the outside of "turbet" (mausoleum) can be seen in relief carved sword and mace, symbolizing the Bektashi order.
    In the front of the Tekke there are two "musafirhanas" (charitable guest houses) that are using for receiving travelers, and in front of them, below of the riverbed, is small mill for grind grain.

    the look of the Tekke Tekka Tekka musafirhanas

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Blagaj - Tekija na vrelu Bune

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 24, 2014

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    Tekke is a sacred place where dervishes, in a special ritual, performed "zikir" (the worship of God.). Through its long and turbulent history, Tekke on the Buna River belonged to various dervishes orders. First it was school of Bektashi order, then Khalwati, Qadiri and today it belongs to Naqshbandi order.
    It is not known the exact date when the Tekke was established, therefore is assumed that it was between 1446 and 1520. Throughout its entire history Tekke was used as a school of Sufi Islam.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Blagaj - Tekija na vrelu Bune

    by croisbeauty Updated Aug 24, 2014

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    Tekke on the river Buna spring is a cultural monument from the early Ottoman era. Worth noting that the medieval Bosnia, until the Ottoman conquest in 1463, was Croatian kingdom. Winning the fortress Bobovac (central part of Bosnia), where the seat of King Stjepan TomaĊĦević was, Ottomans conquered Bosnia. Since then has started an unprecedented pogrom of Croatian population in Bosnia. All Croatian noblemen had to cross over to Islam, over one hundred thousand people were taken into captivity and 30,000 youths in the Janissaries. Bosnia has been converted into Pashaluk, which is divided into districts (sanjak). The head of Sanjak were Islamized Bosnians, whos last names are reminiscent of their Catholic (Croatian) origin.
    In the next 300 years, the number of Croats in Bosnia was halved, and the reason was the displacement, war losses, bringing in Turkish captivity and mass forcible islamization. The mass loss of the local Croatian population Ottomans were offset by the settlement of orthodox Vlachs.
    But worst of all was the institution of "devsirme", also known as blood tax. It was annual practice by which the Ottoman Empire sent military to abduct boys, sons of their Christian subjects who were then converted to islam, with the primary objective of selecting and training the ablest children for the military service, notably into the Janissaries. Janissaries were an elite military formation, always deployed in the front combat lines, known for their bravery and cruelty against the Christian enemies. It is irony of the faith that former childern, now Janissaries, in the Balkans fighting have killed own parents and brothers.

    mlinica

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  • n3da's Profile Photo

    Rafting on the Neretva River

    by n3da Written Mar 6, 2013

    When visiting Bosnia, do try to go off the beaten path as much as you can. Rafting on the Neretva is definitely an exhilarating experience. Halfway from Sarajevo to Mostar, we arrived to a restaurant , where we were welcomed bu a wonderful team of people who will feed you some delicious local specialties , make you laugh and show you a great time. Mind you, it's an all-day activity, so if you do decide go on this adventure, plan to spend the night, having a blast on the riverbank , sitting around a campfire, feeling like you're miles away from civilization.
    As you descend downstream, you will go though the canyon which is reflected in the mesmerizing blue/green color of Neretva .The scenery is breathtaking,don't forget to bring your camera.

    Phone: +387 36 723 173

    Related to:
    • Water Sports
    • Rafting
    • Camping

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  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Blagaj - Tekija

    by pure1942 Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    I don't think this is as off the beaten track as it once was but people visiting Mostar still miss out on this interesting place. Blagaj is located around 12km away from Mostar and can be reached using local transport. Thre are various interesting things to see in Blagaj including the town itself and it's mosque and the Old Town of Blagaj...which we didn't have time to visit unfortunately. (The Old Town is sits on top of a steep rocky bluff overlooking the new town below.)
    However, there is really two things people come to see in Blagaj, The Buna River Spring and the Dervish House or Tekija as it is properly referred to.

    Tekija is a Muslim Monastery of sorts and dates from the end of the 15th century. the house serves as a prayer house and university for spiritual studies of this branch of Islam. Inside the monastery you can see the carpeted prayer rooms. (The one directly in front of you as you come around the top of the stairs has an ancient and beautifully carved wooden ceiling) Upstairs is also a stunning Turkish style bath house.
    On the lower levels of the house is an interesting romm housing the graves of two famous Sheikhs of the house, Sari-Saltuk and Acik-Pasha. Not much is known of the contents of the graves and if indeed there are more graves underneath as it is forbidden to interrupt or excavate the grave site.

    Please remember this is a very special and sacred place for this branch of Muslims. Visitors must be dressed appropriately...no shorts above the knees or sleeveless shirts. Women will be required to cover their heads and legs...Scarves and shawls will be provided for vistors...see my pic of Denise all decked out before entering the house :)

    Very interesting trip to this spiritual and mystic place...Thanks to Holger (HORSCHECK) for the original tip. Until I read his informative tips I wouldn't have thought of coming here.

    Sheihk Graves Denise entering the Dervish Monastery

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  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Kravice Waterfalls - Rope!!!

    by pure1942 Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    This is a well kept local secret. Walking away from the waterfalls through the wooden building on the river bank, you come to a small grassy clearing. Walk to the opposite side of the this clearing to the river bank and there you will find, hanging from a tree, a rope which locals have tied to a overreaching branch. Great fun to be had for all swinging from the rope and jumoing into the beautiful water below!!!!
    A long branch is also left by the tree to retrieve the rope afterwards...just remember to leave the rope tied where you found it when finished.

    Me taking the plunge!!! Me taking the plunge!!! It's colder than it looks in April

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  • pure1942's Profile Photo

    Kravice Waterfalls

    by pure1942 Updated Apr 23, 2009

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    The Spectacular Kravice Waterfalls are not entirely off the beaten track especially for visitors staying in Medjugorje, which is located nearby and from where you can catch a tour. Not a lot of people take this tour anyway so the falls are really only visited by locals. We did pass a small tour from Medjugorje but as they were mostly elderly they were happy enough to just enjoy the view from above and didn't actually go down to the falls.
    However, for visitors staying in Mostar it is not as easy to reach and so people who visit Mostar often don't get a chance to get here. We were lucky enough, that the hostel (Majdas Hostel) we stayed in offered a great trip for guests of the hostel which included a visit to the falls. We were even luckier still that, although visiting on a beautifully warm day, we had the falls almost entirely to ourselves.

    The stunning falls are located around 7 km from the small town of Ljubuski and are an amazing sight. The blue-green colour of the Neretva are mirrored in the water of the falls, where Trebizat River is broken into seperate channels which cascade overe a drop of over 30 metres in a semi circle of rock 140 metres wide. There are various walks behind the cascading water and small caves which can also be explored.
    A little cold for swimming in April but that didn't stop us taking a dip to cool off from the hot sun. One of the highlights of our trip to the Herzegovina region.

    Denise at the falls

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Take a half-day trip to Blagaj

    by HORSCHECK Updated Nov 21, 2008

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    If you stay in Mostar for more than one day, then I would recommend you to also take a half-day trip to Blagaj, just about 10 km southeast of Mostar.

    It is famous for the source of the river Buna, which is located in a cave at the bottom of a steep cliff.

    Just next to it is a Dervish Monastery (Tekke) whose history dates back to the 15th century. Several large restaurants with outdoor terraces are lined up the river banks.

    In the centre of Blagaj the 16th century Careva Mosque and an old Muslim cemetery are well worth seeing. The castle Stepjan Grad overlooks the area, but we didn't have the time to climb up the hill.

    Directions:
    Blagaj can be reached by local bus from Mostar. The trip takes about 45 minutes. Buses #10 and #11 serve the route a few times per day. We asked at the Tourist Information for the timetable.
    A convenient stop to get on the bus is the Spanish Square (Spanski trg) in Mostar. Tickets for 1,80 KM can be bought from the driver, who can also tell you where to get off.

    Buna and Dervish Monastery 16th century Careva Mosque Source of the river Buna Muslim cemetery in Blagaj River Buna near its source
    Related to:
    • Trains
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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  • jlfloyd's Profile Photo

    Kravice Waterfall

    by jlfloyd Written Mar 19, 2008

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    There is the most amazing place outside of Mostar. It is a waterfall that appears as if from no where. It is beautiful and not so touristy. There is a small cafe there, but it is really off the beaten path. Getting there is a bit difficult as I had a local guide take me there. I stayed at Majda's Apartment Hostel and they took me, so you can ask them, give them some cash and they know right how to get there. It is worth it. I went swimming, althought it was quite cold in May, climbed around and behind the waterfall and got scared by the water snakes on the bottom of the clear water lagoon, which my guides told me was perfectly harmless.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Restoration

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Nov 3, 2007

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    Pocitelj's Hajji Alija Mosque is a beautiful, serene building. Looking at it now, it's hard to realize that, not so very long ago, it was a total ruin, its dome a shattered shell and its minaret snapped like a pencil, yet another victim of the war that raged through Bosnia-Herzegovina during the 1990s.

    Built in 1562, the mosque is considered a very fine example of classical Ottoman style, perhaps the finest in BiH. As yet the restoration has only restored the fabric of the building, the delicate decoration that once adorned it has yet to come, but it is once again a functioning mosque and the cool cream interior of unplastered stone has its own appeal.

    Visitors are welcome, with or without their shoes, though respect for Muslim observance should see them left by the door.

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  • TheWanderingCamel's Profile Photo

    Artist's colony

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Nov 3, 2007

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    Lying 25km south of Mostar, clinging to the steep slopes above the Neretva River, the little town of Pocitelj, a tumble of old stone houses, domes and the tall minaret of its mosque all overlooked by a mediaeval fortress (photo 1), is a picture book scene - which makes it all the more poignant when you learn that this village saw one of the last acts of brutal ethnic cleansing and destruction of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The last few years have seen the restoration of some of the the village's major buildings, the 16th century mosque and medressa and one of its beautiful old Ottoman houses (photo 2) - all of which are open to visitors.

    First mention of the fortress here dates from 1444. Built by Hungarians as a defense against Ottoman raids, it fell to the invading Turks in 1471 and the town then remained under Turkish rule until 1888. The town's strategic importance faded when the region became part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the next few decades saw its population decline and many of its buildings fall into ruin. The establishment of an artist's colony (photo 3) in the 1960s brought artists, writers and poets here from all over Europe - until war came to this lovely place (photo 4).

    Moves to restore the artist's colony were made in 1999 and the first artists came in 2003. Since then several houses have been rebuilt, a primary school has been established and more buildings are set for restoration.

    We didn't buy a painting but we did buy some fruit from a basket (photo 5) that was a picture in itself in the way the fruit was wrapped and displayed.

    The fortress on the hill Gavrankapetanovic house - now an artist's colony Artist's returning Beautiful river valley Fruit for sale
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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  • Gottsie's Profile Photo

    Talk to Locals

    by Gottsie Updated Aug 22, 2007

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    A game I love to play is 'guess the nationality.'

    Whilst sitting at the local bar in Mostar watching people walk pass we tryed to guess where people are from, from their clothes and facial features. This is a great way to get talking to some really interesting people and get talking to locals, hear their stories and find out about what happened here.

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Mostar Off The Beaten Path

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