Bascarsija, Sarajevo

4.5 out of 5 stars 30 Reviews

  • Bascarsija
    by Avieira67
  • Bascarsija
    by Avieira67
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  • Odiseya's Profile Photo

    Visit Bascarsija

    by Odiseya Written Mar 20, 2016

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Baščaršija is historical and cultural center of Sarajevo. It is main touristic attraction in Sarajevo but also one of familiar places in whole country. It was build in 15th century by Isa-beg Ishaković who was found whole city. Fire in 19th century reduce its size.

    You could find many historical and religious objects. It is important as place where you can find religious buildings of four main religious in country on very small area. Only Doboj have similar situation.

    It is vivid place, full of interesting shops, pubs, restaurant and it is nice place to visit.

    Directions: Stari grad municipality

    Website: http://bascarsija.info

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  • Kariba's Profile Photo

    Breathe In Bašcaršija

    by Kariba Updated Oct 7, 2014

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    There's not much else I can add about Bašcaršija which hasn't probably already been said by numerous other VT's... perhaps other than to say, for me, there is no better place to start the first day in Sarajevo than in the heart of this magical city.

    Rising early in the morning, I wander along the quiet winding street which leads from my lodgings, behind the Ottoman quarter of Stari-Grad, down towards the beating heart of Sarajevo, Bašcaršija. Here I take my seat on the steps of Sebilj, the wooden fountain in the middle of the stage, and I wait for the story to unfold. A light dusting of icing sugar snow covers the green domes of the Bašcaršija Mosque, set against a backdrop of mist rolling down from the surrounding mountains. I hear muezzins, singing their call to prayer, from nearby minarets and in the distance, the gentle peeling of church bells, chiming in contrast. I can almost taste the layers of cheese filled pastry, as the tantalising smell of burek wafts from the local bakery across the street, and the aroma of freshly brewed coffee fills the air. Parading pigeons scatter as a porter pushes his laden cart across the cobble stones, artisans begin to open up their workshops, vendors set up stalls in the market place and I sit and watch as Stari Grad in all its beauty gradually stirs to life. I think to myself how fortunate I am to be alive in this place, in this time and savour the experience of being in Sarajevo.

    Icing sugar snow dusted domes - Bascarsija Mosque Pigeons on Parade - early morning Sebilj Sarajevo Souvenirs Brass & copperware - artisans plying their trade Sebilj at night
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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Old Turkish Area

    by IreneMcKay Updated Aug 5, 2013

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    Baščaršija is the old Turkish area of Sarajevo. The name means main market. Baščaršija dates from the16th century.

    One of the oldest streets in Baščaršija is Kazandžiluk Street which means Coppersmith Street. This street is lined with beautiful copper goods such as coffee pots and plates. There are many other interesting craft streets and stalls in this area. There are also several mosques, restaurants and a famous Ottoman fountain. If you drink from the fountain you will return to Sarajevo some day.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Bascarsija, Sarajevo, BAH

    by TrendsetterME Written Jul 20, 2013

    The heart and soul of Sarajevo and a striking reminder of its Ottoman past but also home to a majority of the city's hotels, restaurants, sights and nightspots.

    Its such alive and colorful area, makes me spend more hours as sipping a nice coffee and feeding the pigeons which are hanging around .. :)

    While the area was the centre of trade and commerce during the Ottoman's lengthy rule nowadays its rebuilt lanes are packed with a mix of locals, independent travellers and tour groups virtually around the clock: eating, shopping, drinking or just soaking up the atmosphere during an evening stroll.

    Just visit the area, eat some cevapcici, walk around and enjoy ... :)

    Bascarsija, Sarajevo, BAH Bascarsija, Sarajevo, BAH Bascarsija, Sarajevo, BAH Bascarsija, Sarajevo, BAH Bascarsija, Sarajevo, BAH
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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    Baščaršija

    by gordonilla Written Nov 12, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with many of my Sarajevo tips, I experienced them after dark. We walked around the old centre and took in the art and crafts shops along with traditional restaurants.

    These streets are full of history and culture.

    Website: http://www.sarajevo-guide.com/attractions.htm

    Old City (1) Old City (2) Old City (3) Old City (4) Old City (5)

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  • alectrevor's Profile Photo

    Bascarsija

    by alectrevor Updated Sep 23, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the hub of the old town, and main attraction of Sarajevo, mainly in Turkish style, shops , places to eat and drink, just enjoy the atmosphere. This is where all the trams head for. ( i was told to pronouce it Bosh-char-shee-ya. ) The pigeons are here as well. Something thats not here is Macdonalds and Starbucks etc, the Bosnians have there own coffee places and cafes serving cevapi and the like.

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  • picek's Profile Photo

    bird life of Bascarsija

    by picek Written Apr 21, 2010

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    ... it is iconic image of Sarajavo with pigeons under the poplar trees and around Sebilj - the fountain; plenty of them in a crowd, people walking by and children scare them off, some men feeding them and other - plenty to say - taking photos here. In fact, it is great place to sit down, having a coffee or pita (or cevapi if you prefer) and watch the activity in this most scenic of the squares in Bascarsija, the old quarter in Sarajevo.

    The pigeons here rest at the roofs of the nearest buildings, and well, they make mess too on the floor, although you will see some people sitting right there where the mess is. Sometimes you feel like you can touch the pigeon, they are not at all scared.

    Address: Bascarsija

    Directions: You just need to go to Sebilj (fountain) which you cannot miss since is the heart of Bascarsija, and then best to sit for a coffee and relax for some real remarkable views of the crowds, architecture and birds.

    women, child and birds men and birds
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  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    The old town, Bascarsija

    by georeiser Updated Jul 8, 2009

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    The old town, Bascarsija is a cozy area in the centre of Sarajevo with old Bosnian architecture and narrow pedestrian promenades. You will find a lot of small restaurants here.

    You need a functional speech disorder to pronounce the name "Bascarsija". The place should have had a name-change for long time ago.

    The old town, Bascarsija The old town, Bascarsija The old town, Bascarsija The old town, Bascarsija The old town, Bascarsija
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  • Jp799's Profile Photo

    Turkish Quarter (Bascarsija)

    by Jp799 Written Mar 27, 2009

    The Turkish Quarter is a famous area of Sarajevo, which has a large Muslum population. This area of the city is said to preserve the Ottoman culture from the 19. century. There are many cafes, wooden houses, mosques, and narrow lanes.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Bascarsija

    by mikey_e Written Jan 29, 2009

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    Bascarsija is undoubtedly the part of Sarajevo in which visitors spend the majority of their time. It is the section of Stari Grad (the old town) that was built by the Ottomans and that has that characteristic aura that leads people to proclaim Sarajevo “Europe’s most Oriental city”. The majority of buildings in the Bascarsija (which is composed of the Turkish words “baº” meaning head or chief and “çarºija” meaning market) are low structures, despite the presence of a fair number of minarets, mosques and towers, but the crowded nature of the streets can make it rather difficult to get perspective. The city was essentially built up around this nucleus starting in the 15th century, when Isa-Beg Isakovic, the governor of the Turkish province, decided to turn a 13th century Serbian citadel into a market town. Bascarsija has been destroyed and rebuilt on several occasions, thanks to ongoing Turkish wars, Austrian raids, fires, World Wars and finally the Civil War. Nevertheless, the plethora of small craftsmen and merchants (silver and coppers crafts are a specialty, but you’ll also find various textile and lots of food stores) help to preserve the traditional atmosphere. There are also many 16th century mosques in this part of the city, and the call for prayer can often be heard, as can the prayers themselves if you are visiting during a holiday, when the mosques tend to be fuller than usual.

    Directions: In the very centre of the city, line 1 on the tram

    Pigeon square A side street early morning By Gazi Husrev Begova Mosque An old man with a fez in Bascarsija Another view of Pigeon square
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    Bascarsija Dzamija

    by mikey_e Written Jan 28, 2009

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    Bascarsija Mosque is another reminder of the heyday of Ottoman Turkish architecture. Constructed in 1528, it is linked to Havadze Duraka and is a fairly small affair. Given the various domes, however, it is obviously bigger than the Ferhadi Mosque. There isn’t a lot provided by way of information about the mosque, but it is nevertheless one of the most picturesque in the entire Bascarsija district. This isn’t because of the architecture or the artwork of the building, but is more because of the artists who sell their paintings outside the mosque’s gate, the open space that provides a view of the mountains and the Ottoman architecture of the surrounding buildings, and the pigeons that congregate up close towards the Sebilj na Carsiji.

    Directions: In Pigeon square, where line 1 stops at "bascarsija"

    Bascarsija Dzamija's minaret The gate and the artists The fa��ade of the mosque The mosque's rose garden More of the rose garden
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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Sebilj u Bascarsiji

    by mikey_e Written Jan 28, 2009

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    The Sebilj or Fountain is perhaps the most characteristic of all of Sarajevo’s landmarks. In the open square that leads into Bascarsija in front of the Bascarsija Mosque, it is a beautiful structure that combines with the backdrop of the mountains, the pigeon-filled square and the low, Ottoman shops to give the best and most spectacular panorama for pictures in the entire city. The first fountain here was erected by an Ottoman Wazir in 1754, but it was destroyed in the great fires that swept the city in 1852. In 1891, the architect Vancas (who also designed the Franciscan church) planned this monument, which is a wooden structure and would lead you to believe that it is an old Ottoman design. The word “Sebilj” is not, in fact, Slavic (fontana is the word most commonly used) but is an Arabic borrowing. In Arab and specifically Arab Muslim culture, sabil designates a public structure that is erected as a good deed by a pious individual – being a religion of the desert (originally), Islamic culture narrowed the application of this word to fountains built as good deeds, as nothing could be more helpful and thoughtful than ensuring a source of clean water in an arid land.

    Directions: Right in front of the Bascarsija tramway stop (line 1)

    Sebilj The sebilj and the pigeon square
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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    Bascarsija

    by easterntrekker Written Aug 11, 2008

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    The Bascarsija is the old Turkish part of Sarajevo. Built in the the 1400’s, the area was once the town's market place. The streets are named after the products that were once sold there..such as copper alley.There are 40 narrow , interesting streets in all . We had so much fun roaming around sampling the local food and browsing in the shops!

    Address: Sarajevo

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  • neodue's Profile Photo

    BASCARSIJA 3

    by neodue Written Mar 23, 2008

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    Bascarsija was founded in 1462, when Isa-bey
    Ishakovic built an inn and number of shops.
    In that period, majority population lived around
    Emperor's mosque, which is located on the other
    side of Miljacka river, so, Isa-bey Ishakovic built
    a bridge over the river in order to span main
    Sarajevan settlement with economic centre of
    the city.Sixteenth century was the best period in
    the history of Bascarsija. Great number of
    craftsmen had been associating in guilds, thus the
    Bascarsija had been partitioned in streets with
    similar craft shops. Therefore, the streets were
    named as Saraci (Saddlers), Kovaci
    (Blacksmiths), Kazandziluk (Coppersmiths), etc.

    According to some assessments, there were 12,000 shops in this period. Next century could have
    been disastrous for this old part of the city.Huge earthquake struck Sarajevo in 1640, and later in
    1644 and 1656, it was affected by fires. Half a century later, in 1697, Eugene of Savoy fired and
    plundered entire city, when only several buildings remained untouched. Sarajevo was real metropolis
    in 1660 and the second most important city in Ottoman Empire.Over 80,000 people lived in
    Sarajevo, and two centuries later, Zagreb and Belgrade had just around 15,000 inhabitants each.
    Range of accidents and events were reasons for cessation of development of Sarajevo and
    Bascarsija. By Austria-Hungary arrival, foreign architects wanted to make European city from
    Sarajevo.

    They succeeded in this idea after fire that struck everything but the part of Bascarsija which still exists. Thus the border between the old and „modern“
    part of the city emerged at the endof Ferhadija Street.

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    BASCARSIJA 2

    by neodue Written Mar 23, 2008

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    Bascarsija is an old Sarajevan market-place,
    historical and cultural centre of Sarajevo city.
    Bascarsija was built in 15th century, when
    Isa-bey Ishakovic had founded entire city.
    Word Bascarsija is derived from Turkish word
    „baš“ which means „main“, thus the whole word
    „Bašèaršija“ means „main market-place“.
    Bascarsija is twice smaller than it used to be,
    because of the fire in 19th century. Communist
    authorities wanted to destroy it completely in
    1940's, but fortunately, they gave up from that
    plan. Bascarsija is located on north Miljacka
    riverside, Old Town municipality.There are several
    important historical objects in Bascarsija, such as
    Gazi Husref-bey's mosque and Tower Clock.

    Gazi Husref-bey built his mosque in 1530. He also
    built in the Bascarsija Madrasah (Moslem religious
    secondary school), library, hammam (Turkish bath),
    Bezistan (domed market building), Morica Han
    (inn), Tower Clock and many other objects.Gazi
    Husref-bey is buried in the harem of his mosque,
    and beside him is a domed burial site of his freed
    slave and the first mutevelija (mosque
    superintendent) of his endowment Murat-bey
    Tardic. Bascarsija was the strongest in the second
    half of 16th century. There were 80 different crafts,
    organized in craft-guilds. Bascarsija was organized
    in the crafts, so shops of one or more similar crafts
    would have been settled in each street (e.g. Kovaci
    Street, Kazandziluk Street, Saraci Street, etc.)


    A range of trade objects were constructed in this period (bezistan, hostelries, resting places for caravans – karavansaraji and many other).
    Sarajevo was important trade centre in Balkan with three bezistans (Gazi Husref-bey's Bezistan and Bursa Bezistan exist today). There were Venetian
    and Ragusan colonies in Sarajevo. Around 12,000 trade shops were settled in Bascarsija in that period, but 17th century was not so good for
    Sarajevo and Bascarsija. Sarajevo was struck by earthquake in 1640 year and affected by fire several times in 1644 and 1656.
    However, famous travel writer Evlija Celebija wrote in 1660: „Carsija has a thousand and eighty shops, which are paragons of beauty. Carsija itself
    is very attractive and built according to a plan.“Unfortunately, Eugene of Savoy broke in Sarajevo in 1697, fired and devastated entire city. Only
    several buildings remained. Region of Sarajevo city did not develop too much up to 19th century. During Austria-Hungary occupation in 1878, many
    foreign architects wanted to transform Sarajevo in a modern European city. The fire, which devastated entire old town except the part that still exists,
    helped them a lot. Well-known border between Bascarsija and Ferhadija Street emerged in this way.

    After liberation of Sarajevo in 1945 year, new city people's board made decision for devastation of carsija with an explanation that old trades centre
    does not have a role in the modern city. Bascarsija however succeeded to survive and its modern role in the city became a standard in 1970.

    Directions: Bascarsija is main tourist attraction of the city.Before arrival of Ottomans, the biggest
    settlement in Sarajevo valley was market-place Tornik, which was located at crossroads, where Ali-pasa's mosque is today.

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