More Unique Places in Prague

  • Franz Kafka statue in the Jewish Quarter
    Franz Kafka statue in the Jewish Quarter
    by Jefie
  • Zoubek's Monument to the victims of Communism
    Zoubek's Monument to the victims of...
    by Jefie
  • Prague's Hunger Wall
    Prague's Hunger Wall
    by Jefie

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Prague

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    Strahov Stadium

    by HORSCHECK Updated Feb 6, 2016

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    The Strahov Stadium (Velky Strahovsky Stadion) is the largest sports stadium in the world. Its field size equals about 9 football pitches.

    The stadium was opened in 1926 as a venue for mass gymnastics events, which at that time were so called Sokol gatherings. During the communist era these were replaced by the Spartakiade.

    These mass physical-exercises were often followed by more than 220.000 spectators in the stadium.

    Nowadays the stadium is used as a training ground for the football club Sparta Prague. Sometimes it is the venue for concerts or similar events. The future of the decrepit stadium is uncertain.

    Directions
    The Strahov Stadium is located on a hill in Prague's Strahov district. It can be found just west of the green Petrin park, which can be reached by the Petrin funicular.

    Strahov Stadium (2015) Strahov Stadium (2015) Strahov Stadium (2015) Strahov Stadium (2015) Strahov Stadium (2003)
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    Teeny tiny things..........

    by leics Updated Oct 31, 2015

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    Now, here's an odd place well worth a visit. It's the Museum of Miniatures which is in (appropriately) a small building in the courtyard of the Strahov Monastery courtyard.

    Inside are amazing tiny things (you view them through microscopes) made by a Russian chap called Anatoly Konyenko (who has made the world's smallest book).

    There's a flea with golden horseshoes, scissors and key, a caravan of camels in the eye of a needle, trains running on human hairs...........totally weird and totally enthralling stuff.

    What an amazing skill to develop!

    Tram 22 or 23 to stop 'Pohorelec', then walk into the monastery courtyard; the museum is signed from there.

    Tiny museum of tiny things
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    Off the tourist grid: Operation Anthropoid Mem.

    by steedappeal Updated Aug 14, 2015

    It will take a bit of tourist stamina to visit this memorial to the heroes who attacked Nazi tyranny way back at 10:35 am on May 27, 1942.

    The area has drastically changed but you can still get a sense of the "rounding the corner" drama that unfolded between Reinhard Heydrich and his Czech resistance attackers.

    The signage is in Czech so read-up before you go.

    Unless you take a taxi (Interesction of Zenklova & V. Holesovickach), you can take a tram 3 or 10 to Vychovatelna stop in Prague 8.

    It is a zig, zaggy walk through several underpasses until you arrive at the memorial.

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    Petrin Lookout Tower.

    by Pod Updated Aug 5, 2015

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    Height: 64 m a bloke down the pub told me from the bottom of the hill to the top of it is the same hieght as the Eiffel Tower.
    Built as a mini version of Paris's Eiffel Tower, the Petrin Observation Tower was built in 1891 for the Jubilee Exhibition.

    The tower is 60m tall, which doesn't seem particularly high until you add in the fact that it sits at the summit of Petrin Hill, which is 318m (1043 feet) high.

    Climb the 299 steps to reach the top of the tower and the view over Prague is magnificent. On a clear day it is possible to see the highest peak in the Czech Republic, Snezka, which is 150km away.

    The Petrin Observation Tower is set in landscaped gardens, which make for a pleasant stroll all year round. In the grounds there is also a hall of mirrors, an observatory with a telescope open to the public, a church and a rose garden (small entrance fees apply for the tower, mirror maze and observatory - there is no need to pre-book).

    Much of the stone used to build the major sights in Prague was quarried out of Petrin. But this is well hidden beneath the grass and the trees that cover the hillside.

    To reach the Observation Tower and other attractions at the top of Petrin Hill you can take the Funicular Railway, which departs from Ujezd street in the Lesser Town (Malá Strana) (tram stop Ujezd).

    Alternatively, catch a taxi or take a 30 minute stroll up Petrin Hill. The climb is steep, but the walk is very pleasant, passing through the gardens and trees.

    Petrin Tower. Petrin station.
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    Hrad Ceský Šternberk

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 31, 2014

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    This castle is located about 30 minutes south of Prague on Highway E65 E50. You can't park at the castle itself. You will park down below. There are a couple ways to walk up to the castle. The website doesn't indicate appointments need to be made. The castle was closed but they said we could participate in the tour but we would have to wait about 45 minutes. So, we waited. It was worth while.

    Not many castles you visit will be fully furnished in period furniture and décor. This one was which was great! Founded in 1241, this castle still belongs in the family, a descendant of the man who first had it built, Zdeslav of Sternberg. They actually live on the second floor. You will tour the 3rd floor. The tour is about 40-50 minutes. Since this tour was in the Czech language, we were given laminated information sheets in English.

    Entrance cost is 125CZK for the Czech language tour. Other language tours cost 195CZK.

    It does cost money to use the toilet.

    Located at 257 27 Ceský Šternberk, Ceská republika

    Please see my travelogue for more photos of the castle

    View from the castle Family Tree
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    Josefov - Kostel svetoho Ducha

    by croisbeauty Updated Mar 28, 2014

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    Kostel sv. Ducha (Church of the Holy Spirit) is situated at the border of the Old Town and Josefov, right next to the Spanish Synagogue. It was originally founded in 1346 as a Gothic single-aisle building. It belonged to the Benedictine order who had a convent adjacent to the church. During the Hussite wars, in the 15th century, the church was severely plundered same as the most of the Roman Catholic churches in Prague. In 1689, during a Big Fire in the city the church was destroyed and rebuilt in the Baroque style.
    During the reign of Emperor Ferdinand I (1503-1564), Jews had to attend catholic service in this church.

    kostel svateho Ducha kostel svateho Ducha kostel sv. Ducha and Spanish synagogue in behind

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    Narodni trida

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 31, 2013

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    Narodni trida is one of the important avenues in Prague, placed on the boundary of NewTown and Old Town. It is connecting Most legii (the Legion Bridge) with The Jungmannovo namesti, right on the line where in the medieval times there were the city walls.
    Narodni trida is home of important buildings and institutions, such as, National Theatre and Czech Academy of Sciences. It is also home of a few very beautiful houses built in Art Nouveau style.
    For young Czech population this avenue has a particular significance, in 1989 riot police violently suppressed here a peaceful student demonstrations, which is thought as initiation of so-called Velvet Revolution.

    Viola Building Topic Building Czech Academy of Sciences Viola building Viola building

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    Memorial to the victims of the regime

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 25, 2013

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    The monument to the victims of Communism is located in Mala Strana Ujezd. The monument was unveiled in 2002 and made by sculptor Olbram Zoubek and architects Zdenek Hoelzel and Jan Kerel.
    The monument consists of a monumental staircase on which there are seven bronze sculptures of figures who gradually turn into torsos. A bronze strip goes through the centre of the staircase and there are a number of people on the stripe, whom the communist regime sentenced, executed, killed while escaping and forced to emigrate.
    I visited Prague before the fall of the Berlin Wall and well remember the harassment to which I was exposed when entering and leaving the country. At that time Prague was equally beautiful town, as it is today, but very rusty.

    the monument to the victims of Communism the monument to the victims of Communism

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    Josefov - Parizska ulice

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 25, 2013

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    Parizska ulice is the heart of Josefov and its main street. The street looks very representative, filed with beautiful buildings and prestigious rooftops. Between 1893 and 1913 most of the ghetto was demolished, as a part of an initiative to model the city of Paris. Obviously, it became an elite quarter in which lived the most wealthy members of the Jewish community of Prague.
    Parizska street is a mecca for shoppers, but for those for whom the cost is not important at all. Here are arranged, side by side in a row, shops with the most prestigious fashion brands.
    In the small park, next to the Old-new synagogue, is exposed a very beautiful sculpture of Moses, work of great Czech sculptor František Bilek. Bilek (1872-1941) is famous Czech Art Nouveau and Symbolist sculptor and architect. His works often reflect Biblical themes or have religious connotations. The bronze sculpture of Moses, work from 1905, represents the Bilek's vision of the Old Testament prophet. The figure of a kneeing man in a superhuman size who writes on the scroll the name "Adam", as a symbol of a mankind.

    Moses by Franti��ek Bilek Moses by Franti��ek Bilek Parizska ulice

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    Josefov - Jewish Town Hall + Vysoka synagoga

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 23, 2013

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    Židovska radnice (Jewish Town Hall) was constructed adjacent to the Old-New Synagogue, on the corner of Maiselova and Červena ulice. The building was constructed in Renaissance style but it acquired its Rococo facade in the 18th century. It was the main meeting house of the local Jewish community but currently is close for the public. The building features two clocks on its rooftop, one on a tower with Roman numeral markings, the other, lower, has Hebrew numarals, which are the same as letters in the Hebrew alphabet. The Hebrew numerals begin with "aleph" and continue counterclockwise around the clock dial.
    Vysoka synagoga (High Synagogue) was financed by Mordechai Maisel and it was finished in 1568, the same years as the Jewish Town Hall. The building was designed by P.Roder in Renaissance style. It was designated as a preaching place for councilors of the Jewish Town Hall. In 1689 it was destroyed in a Great Fire, reconstructed in 1883 but the facade was simplified to the modern appearance.

    Jewish Town Hall&Vysoka synagoga the clocks of the Jewish Town Hall The Jewish Town Hall from Maiselova ulice Josefov - Old Jewish Ghetto

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    Josefov - Maiselova synagoga

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 23, 2013

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    Maiselova synagoga (Maisel Synagogue), designed by Josef Wahl and Juda Goldsmied in late Renaissance style, was built in 1590-1592 as a private chapel for the Maisel family. Mordechai Maisel (1528-1601), who commissioned the synagogue, was a very rich man. He was a mayor, Minister of Finance, philanthropist and communal leader of Jews. The synagogue burnt down in 1689 and was then rebuilt in Baroque style. Since 1918 the synagogue became a center of Jewish Reformists.The synagogue survived Nazi occupation because it was planned to be the part of so-called "museum of extinct race".
    Mordechai Maisel financed a large number of the Renaissance buildings in the Josefov district, changing face of a ghetto into a modern city look.
    The synagogue serves today as a Jewish Museum, of a history of Jews in Bohemia and Moravia from the 10th to the 18th century.

    Maiselova synagoga Maiselova synagoga Maiselova synagoga

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    Josefov - Pinkasova synagoga

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 23, 2013

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    Pinkasova synagoga (Pinkas Synagogue) was founded in 1535 as a private chapel of Pinkas-Horowitz family, one of the richest members of Jewish community of Prague. It is now the second oldest synagogue in Josefov, built in the late Gothic style and later on partly renovated in early Renaissance style.
    Nowadays the synagogue is part of a Jewish Museum of Prague and the place of major importance for the entire Jewish people. Pinkas Synagogue is now one of the memorials to the victims of the holocaust. During WW II and the time of the occupation, Nazis killed most of Jews who lived in Czechoslovakia. The names of 77,297 victims were written on the synagogue's walls, to keep the memory of the Jews who did not survive the camp in Terezin.

    Pinkasova synagoga Pinkasova synagoga Pinkasova synagoga Pinkasova synagoga

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    Josefov - Španelska synogaga

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 23, 2013

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    Španelska synagoga (Spanish Synagogue) is a Moorish revival synagogue built in 1868 to the design of Vojtech Ignatz Ullmann. The synagogue was built on the site of the most ancient synagogue in Prague, called The Old Synagogue, which may originally have been used by Byzantine Jews, known as Romaniotes. The Old Synagogue was demolished in 1867.
    The facade copies the Leopoldstadter Tempel in Vienna. It has tripartite facade with a tall central section flanked by lower wings on each side. The central section is topped by a pair of domed turrets. Despite its name, the synagogue was never used by a Sephardic congregation, it was an early Reform temple.
    The building is owned by the complex of Jewish Museum of Prague and is used as museum and concert hall.

    Spanelska synagoga

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    Josefov - Staronova synagoga

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 23, 2013

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    Staronova synagoga (Old-New Synagogue), dating back to the 13th century, is the oldest synagogue in the Central Europe. It is also the oldest surviving medieval synagogue of twin-nave design.
    Completed in 1270 in Gothic style, it was one of the Prague's first Gothic buildings. (A still older Prague synagogue, known as the Old Synagogue, was demolished in 1867 and replaced by the Spanish Synagogue.) Originally it was called the New of the Great Synagogue. Its name deviates from the Hebrew "al tenay" which means on condition. According to the legend, angels have brought stones from the Temple of Jerusalem to build the synagogue in Prague, "on condition", that they are to be returned when the Messiah comes.
    The synagogue follows orthodox custom which separate seating for men and women during prayer services. Women sit in an outer room with small windows looking into the main sanctuary. It is said that the body of Golem (created by Rabbi Judah Lowe ben Bezalel) lies in the attic where the "genizah" of Prague's community is kept. Genizah is a storage area in the Jewish synagogue or cemetery designated for the temporary storage of books and papers of religious topics, but also for deceased bodies prior to proper cemetery burial.
    It is not allowed to take the pictures inside of the synagogue but I risked and took my chances.

    the Old-New Synagogue flag with the Star of Dabvid torah ark bimah the Old-New Synagogue

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    Josefov - Monument to Kafka

    by croisbeauty Updated Dec 23, 2013

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    Franz Kafka (1883-1924) was a German-language writer of novels and short stories, regarded as one of the most influential authors of the 20th century.
    The monument to Kafka is located in Dušni/Vezenska, right next to the Spanish Synagogue. It is symbolic location because the Kafka family lived at Dušni street no. 27. The sculptor, Jaroslav Rona, was inspired by an short story written by Kafka called "Popis jednohu zapasu" (Description of a struggle). Novel tells about young man riding on another man's shoulder through the streets of Prague. The split design of the statue refers back to the spiritual split of the writer mentioned in the novel. In Rona's work that figure is Kafka himself sitting astride a headless man.
    A bronze statue was unveiled in 2003.

    the statue of Franz Kafka the statue of Franz Kafka

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