Cesky Krumlov Local Customs

  • A Trdelink Broken In Two Wrapped in Cinnamon
    A Trdelink Broken In Two Wrapped in...
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Local Customs
    by TooTallFinn24
  • Local Customs
    by TooTallFinn24

Most Recent Local Customs in Cesky Krumlov

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    St. Martin Day Wine

    by TooTallFinn24 Updated Sep 5, 2015

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    The Czech Republic is not know for its wines throughout Europe. However late one evening when i couldn't find anything to do in the room I ventured downstairs to an area that included a wine refrigerator. I met a man from Czech Republic and our conversation quickly turned to wine and beer. He said that some of the wines in the cooler were most likely St. Martin Day Wines. When I pleaded ignorance to what St. Martin's Day was he told me the story. I found it indeed interesting not knowing of similar traditions in the United States.

    Every year on November 11th at exactly 11 a.m. wineries and many restaurants throughout the Czech Republic open their first wines of the season. The day is intended to signify the end of the harvest. The wines that are opened on this day are young fruity tasting wines with low alcohol contents. Cabarnet Sauvignon, Rose and a Sauvignon Blanc are among the types of wine that are opened on this day. This tradition of St. Martin's Day is apparently even older than comparable days in France. The tradition in the Czech Republic goes back to the time of Emperor Joseph. There are also a wide assortment of foods that are also served on St. Martin's Day.

    I also learned that St. Martin's Day is celebrated in other places most notably Germany. There it was celebrated for the final harvesting of wheat and slaughter of fattened cattle. It is not a public holiday in either the Czech Republic or Germany. However from what I heard it is widely celebrated in both countries.

    Of course I had to try one of the wines. The rose was indeed light and fruity. The price of the bottle was extremely reasonable amounting to about 100 CZH or about $ 4 US.

    St, Martin Day Wines from Moravia

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    Electrical Storms in a Box...?

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jul 5, 2015

    Redesigned fuse boxes, seen on a house in ul. Pansk√°. Funny idea! People in this tourist hotspot have preserved their sense of humour, and their creativity. The red lightning arrow is part of the original design as a warning of electricity, and then someone has added the clouds.

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    Having A Trdelink At a Bakery

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Jun 20, 2015

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    Walking the streets of old town Cesky Krumlov you can smell them from the street side shops at a distance. The Trdelink is tasty little dessert made from rolled dough then grilled on a machine. They are served coated with a wide variety of toppings such as cinnamon, sugar, chocolate or even bathed in fruit. They are sometimes eaten as a bracelet but we had ours on a plate.

    The trdelink is a desert that grew up in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. They have been served in these areas for a long time. The metal poles or sticks that they are rolled and cooked on always seem to be difficult for the waitresses and waiters to get off without burning your fingers.

    So the taste? It was good but not outstanding. My wife and I both agreed we liked churros with cinnamon better. A trdelink will set you back about 40-50 crown or about 2 USD.

    A Trdelink Broken In Two Wrapped in Cinnamon

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Trdelník

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 16, 2013

    This name is not a typo and not as difficult to pronounce as it may look - just consider the "r" a vowel, and it works. Learning this word is worth it because it gets you a simple but yummy treat. Trdelník is a kind of fresh pastry which originates in Transsylvania but is popular all over the Czech Republic and also Slovakia. A thin stripe of dough is wrapped around a metal cylinder and then baked. When done, it is rolled in grated nuts or sugar and cinnamon, taken off the cylinder and served warm. Eat it immediately, it is best when fresh and still warm. Many "hole in the wall" eateries in the old town make and sell it so it is not hard to find.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

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  • Eugenetheduck's Profile Photo

    Campfired sausages...I mean frankfurts

    by Eugenetheduck Written Jun 26, 2006

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    Just a case of lost in translation...

    Just before reaching Cesky Krumlov our coach stopped at a hypermarket. Our Czech companions told us that they were all buying sausages to cook at the campsite for dinner. To an Australian a sausage needs a hot plate and this is how we assumed we would be cooking our sausages. What they meant was what we call a fat frankfurt. Needless to say we were not able to skewer our thin sausages on a branch of a willow tree. Luckily for us others had spare 'sausages' and we had fun roasting them with our sticks over the flames of a campfire. I just wish I had some marshmallows.

    Cooking sausages over a campfire
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Camping
    • Backpacking

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  • Roeffie's Profile Photo

    Sgraffito everywhere!

    by Roeffie Written Oct 19, 2004

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    Well it isn't much of a local custom tip. But it is at least very common in Cesky Krumlov and in the Czech Republic.

    A lot of the buildings are painted with sgraffito. You think to see some stones, but it's all painted on the building.

    Great example of Craftmansship!

    The Castle

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    curious sign

    by xaver Written Apr 13, 2003

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    This is a cuirous sign I found on the entrance of the castle, it might mean: do not feed the bears on the other side of the gate.

    sign

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Cesky Krumlov Local Customs

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