Brest Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by alectrevor
  • Things to Do
    by alectrevor
  • Things to Do
    by alectrevor

Most Recent Things to Do in Brest

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    For Your Last Beer

    by johngayton Written Nov 8, 2015

    At Brest railway station there's an all-purpose bar/café/tabac/newsagent and general convenience store called "TRIB's". Friendly little place, good-looking eats and rather tasty barmaid. The terrace is on the afternoon sunny side of the station, overlooking the commercial port.

    Ideal for a beer on the sunny afternoon as I was leaving...

    Address: Gare de Brest

    Directions: On the station concourse, overlooking the commercial port.

    Website: http://www.gares-sncf.com/fr/gare/frbes/brest/boutiques-et-restauration/tribs

    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Trains

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    Soviet Brutalism???

    by johngayton Written Nov 8, 2015

    OK this is just a bit of fun but I couldn't help but note that Brest's post-war central square reminded me of those much derided Soviet installations from the same time.

    So, did Stalin take his inspiration from the French? Or vice-versa?

    Pics are the Place de la Liberte and the Hotel de Ville.

    I'll leave that up to you guys to decide.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

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    Musée National de la Marine

    by johngayton Updated Nov 8, 2015

    The Chateau de Brest is a "Thing to Do" in its own right and the fact that it hosts the Musée National de la Marine is a doubleplusgood bonus.

    This is one of the five French National Maritime Museums, the others being in Paris, Port Louis, Rochefort and Toulon, which began with the "Salle de Marine" at Paris's Louvre in 1752. In the aftermath of the Second World War Brest's castle was about the only substantial building left of the city and was taken over by the French navy who used some of the site to establish their Naval College.

    The main towers of the castle, its keep and ramparts became the museum in 1955 and now house the collections of sculpture, ship models and other naval paraphernalia which escaped capture during the German wartime occupation.

    This makes for a fascinating couple of hours, taking in the castle itself and the museum exhibits which follow the city's history and that of the French Navy through about 17 centuries. The free audioguide explains everything as you wander and is available in French, English, Spanish, German and Italian.

    Of particular interest to me was the room devoted to mastheads and other ship-borne artworks and you get great views over the city, the river and the bay from the ramparts.

    For 6 euros, including the audioguide, this is definitely a must-do.

    Address: Chateau de Brest

    Directions: Overlooking the naval harbour, where the H-shaped bridge is. Metro - "Chateau".

    Website: http://www.musee-marine.fr/content/brest-musee-de-la-marine

    Main Entrance Inside the castle View from ramparts Mastheads and other ship-borne sculptures A few of the models datoing from the 18th century
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Le Chateau de Brest

    by johngayton Written Nov 8, 2015

    About the only substantial structure, apart from a couple of sections of the city walls, that is left of Brest's pre-World War II existence is its imposing castle overlooking the Rade de Brest, the sheltered deepwater bay that brought Brest's rise to prosperity, its destruction and its subsequent rebuilding.

    The original "chateau" was the town, with everything protected within its walls, but as the burgeoning town outgrew the restrictions of those walls the castle became, literally, the cornerstone of the important naval and commercial port Brest was to become.

    As military technology advanced, especially regarding artillery, the walls of the chateau were thickened to withstand bombardment but following the French Revolution and the subsequent defeat of Napoleon the castle lost its military importance as Europe temporarily calmed down.

    For a time it was used as a prison, and probably not a pleasant one at that, and then during the German occupation of the city during World War II it was used as a barracks and part of the "Atlantic Wall" defences against the Allied forces.

    Le Chateau de Brest is now part of the French Musee National de la Marine (French Naval Museum) which has its headquarters in Paris and other museums in the ports of Port Louis, Rochefort and Toulon.

    If you don't want to spend the money, 6 euros I think it was, for the museum you can still walk around the outer walls and gardens for free.

    Address: Chateau de Brest!

    Directions: Above the naval harbour, where the H-shaped bridge is.

    Website: http://www.musee-marine.fr/

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Photography

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    The City Walls

    by johngayton Updated Nov 6, 2015

    Brest has been a fortified town since the time of the Roman Empire, when Brittany was known as Armorica and until the 16th century the town lay wholly within the walls of the castle. Towards the end of the 16th century the castle was refortified to keep pace with advances in naval artillery and the town grew outside its walls.

    Around 1680 the prolific military engineer Vauban was commissioned to review the burgeoning city's fortifications which involved creating ramparts as firing platforms for the defence of the harbour, with the castle as its stronghold and as barracks for the artillery crews.

    World War II saw most of the walls destroyed by allied bombing and bombardment and pretty much all that remains is the seaward sections facing the ports and the castle itself. A pleasant promenade is the Cours Dajot which runs from just outside the railway station, along the front overlooking the commercial harbour, and finishes at the gardens of the Naval College and the Chateau.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • alectrevor's Profile Photo

    Recouveance Bridge Brest

    by alectrevor Updated Nov 11, 2014

    This bridge a massive drawbridge over the river Penfeld. 64 m high [ 214 ft ] separates the city district and Recovrance district. Brest lies on one of the worlds finest harbours, with nearly 60 square miles of deep water

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    American Monument

    by alectrevor Updated Nov 8, 2014

    Insription says " Erected by the United States of America to commemorate the achievements of the Naval Forces of the United States of America and France during the World War. -- -- In English and French

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  • bonio's Profile Photo

    Things to do

    by bonio Written Mar 7, 2011

    Well, do a little research, we decided to visit the maritime Museum on a morning - only open in the afternoon and then to visit Oceanopolis on a Monday, guess what it's closed on Mondays. Our own fault with a little planning we could have made far more of Brest, here's some photos of the harbour the castle and our wandering around town anyway.

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  • freemattia's Profile Photo

    Seaside by bus

    by freemattia Written Jan 18, 2009

    If you are in Brest and wish to go to the seaside but you don't have a car, don't worry, you can get a bus from the bus station off the train station and you get to go there. Stop in Porspoder and you will enjoy the amazing landscape of this part of the coast by walking. You can see from here the famous light-house "Phare du Four" and tipical houses, free horses and goats.
    Bring with you some food for a picnic and enjoy. Don't forget your k-way. Weather is a bit crazy and while you think it's the perfect sunny day in a moment you will have 5 minutes of rain and the sun again and the rain again.
    The village is small, you can find 1 or 2 bars a restaurant and a creperie. There is also a small supermarket close to the church if you forgot to bring your food for the picnic. Buy bread and local cheese and go.

    Address: Bus from Brest, stop in Porspoder

    Directions: Porspoder village

    Phare du Four Porspoder
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Road Trip

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    Every end of September, a typical big fair

    by earendil Written Sep 25, 2005

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    During three days, for the Saint Michel (29th september), a big fair is organized in the city and the streets are closed to cars.
    Some streets are reserved to professional merchants, and you can find good items for your house or for you.
    On the "freedom place", it's reserved for children who can sell their old toys and old books...it's very fun and nice for them, they can earn a bit of money.

    Address: City center

    From the town hall The center of the fair A french pacha Some original items you can find strange faces...

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    Beautiful sea side

    by Toyin Updated Dec 21, 2004

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    If you are making Brest by private car, it is interesting to make a stop at St Brieuc. This is a beautiful sea side with an english speaking population. You could see a slightly different culture here, in comparison with Paris. You ll see people in a near traditional Anglo-Saxion way of life..but they still speak French.

    Address: You cant miss it..National 12 highway from Paris.

    Directions: It is about 80 miles to Brest. From Paris, you likely start on A11 as I did, then you link with National 12. About two third of your driving to Brest , you will see St Brieuc.

    A lady walking her Horse and Dog in St Brieuc.
    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips

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    The Chateau

    by Toyin Written Dec 8, 2004

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    Brest enjoys a wonderful location, on the shores of an enormous bay, with the beauty of inland and coastal Brittany all around it. The city is a centre of commerce, combining the cobbled streets and fortifications of the old port with all the attractions and facilities of the modern city.

    Address: Brest Naval Shipyard

    Marine Museum
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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    The Tanguy Tower

    by bambino36 Written Sep 13, 2004

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    Built on a block of granite, the Bastille of Quilbignon or "Tower of the Tanguy" occupies a privileged location in edge of the river Penfeld in front of the castle of Brest. Inside the Tower there's an interesting museum about Brest history.

    Phone: +33 (0)298008860

    The Tanguy Tower, Brest

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    Les Alignements de Carnac

    by Porteplume Updated Jun 9, 2003

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    .
    Français:
    Sites mégalithiques: alignements de menhirs, et dolmens et tumulus.
    Photo: Les alignements de Carnac:
    Il s'agit de menhirs disposés en lignes à peu près parallèles. (3000 sur Carnac). Les Alignements se composent de trois principaux champs, ils avaient probablement un rôle culturel et religieux
    La période où l'on a construit ces mégalithes a duré environ de 4500 à 2000 ans avant J-C, c'est la période néolithique.

    Les dolmens ou tumulus avaient une fonction funéraire et servaient de sépultures collectives ou individuelles.

    English:
    The Megaliths were erected during the neolithic period which lasted from 4500 BC until 2000 BC.
    The two main structures of the megalithic architecture are "Menhirs" and "Dolmens" and "Tumulus".
    Dolmens and Tumulus were burial structures, they were either collective or individual tumbs.
    Menhirs: an army of stones
    There are approximately 3000 menhirs in the Carnac area. The alignments probably had a cultural role and were a place of worship.

    Carnac - [own photo]

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    A great day out for old and young kids

    by bzh Updated Feb 27, 2003

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    Océanopolis is not just an aquarium. It is a full blown marine life museum. Divided in three parts, for temperate, polar and tropical climates. Kids can learn all about ocean life while having a lot of fun. Make sure you don't miss the penguin feeding time.

    Address: On the Moulin Blanc harbour

    Directions: If driving, just follow the signs. Otherwise, take bus 7 to "Port de Plaisance" and alight at the "Océanopolis" stop.

    Website: http://www.oceanopolis.com/

    Boats and Oc��anopolis building
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Aquarium
    • Museum Visits

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Brest Things to Do

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