Munich Local Customs

  • Christopher Street Day Parade
    Christopher Street Day Parade
    by IreneMcKay
  • Christopher Street Day Parade
    Christopher Street Day Parade
    by IreneMcKay
  • Christopher Street Day Parade
    Christopher Street Day Parade
    by IreneMcKay

Most Recent Local Customs in Munich

  • Chinggis_n_Borte's Profile Photo

    Local Market and Food eateries - Viktualienmarkt

    by Chinggis_n_Borte Updated Mar 1, 2016

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    Viktualienmarkt

    This place was called once upon a time "Markplatz" a church was demolished on this spot under the order of King Maximillian in 1807 to make way of the growing food market at "Marienplatz". Since the last few years it is now popularly called "Viktualienmarkt".

    If you happen to be at Marienplatz and looking for quick cheap local foods and drinks then we highly recommend you go here first than getting into the expensive restaurant around and within Marienplatz. This place could get real crowded especially when the soccer foot ball team "Munich Bayern" have a game. It is more of an open food court and you can simply join table with locals and chat with tourists. There's lots of different beers around here, but what we enjoy eating here is the German Kebabs in a plate. It is really delicious and cheap by tourist standard.This is not only a food court but also a market for local produce where you can buy German made handcrafts, clothes , shirts, bags, flowers and many other souvenirs.

    Opening hours

    During the following hours, all stalls and shops are open. Some open earlier, some close later - depending on the individual shop:

    Monday to Friday 10am - 6pm Saturday 10am - 3pm

    To get there

    Public transport S-Bahn lines 1-8, U3 or U6, Bus 52 to Marienplatz, then walk towards Tal and turn right behind St. Peter's church

    Website: http://www.muenchen.de/int/en/shopping/markets/viktualienmarkt.html

    Giant lobster at Viktualienmarkt Viktualienmarkt Viktualienmarkt
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    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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    Juliet Statue

    by IreneMcKay Written Sep 6, 2015

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    I was surprised to see this statue in Munich and thought thatit looked exactly like the Juliet statue in Verona. I did not realise Munich is twinned with Verona. The Juliet statue is a gift to the people of Munich from the people of Verona. They received it in 1974. It is a custom to present the statue with flowers or like the one in Verona rub her breast for luck. This statue is located on the southern side of the old town hall.

    Juliet Statue Juliet Statue
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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Christopher Street Day Parade

    by IreneMcKay Written Sep 5, 2015

    The very first Christopher Street Day took place in 1980 so 2015's celebrations were the 36th to be carried out. Around 200,000 people took part.

    There was a huge procession of floats travelling around the city centre. We spent some time watching the festivities.

    Christopher Street Day Parade Christopher Street Day Parade Christopher Street Day Parade Christopher Street Day Parade
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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Munich Christopher Street Day

    by IreneMcKay Written Sep 5, 2015

    We arrived in Munich on July 11th 2015. There was a lot of partying and celebrating going on. We had no idea why. It turned out to be Munich Christopher Street Day! This is apparently the biggest gay and lesbian celebration in Bavaria. It takes place every July and lasts for nine days. We started by watching the Schuhplattler dancing taking place in Marienplatz. With our usual impeccable timing this was just ending as we arrived.

    Munich Christopher Street Day Marien Platz on Munich Christopher Street Day Munich Christopher Street Day
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Street Muscicians

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Feb 28, 2015

    When walking along the cenre of Munich we enjoyed the street musicians playing Mozart.

    You can watch my 1 min 51 sec Video Munchen Street musicians and Mozart out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Street Muscicians Street Muscicians Street Muscicians Street Muscicians

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Voltage, frequency and plug ins.

    by Jerelis Written Apr 27, 2013

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    Maybe it sounds a bit weird, but as an experience traveler I know that you every now and then need this kind of information in advance: electricity in France is 230 Volts, alternating at 50 cycles per second. If you travel to France with a device that does not accept 230 Volts at 50 Hertz, you will need a voltage converter.

    There are three main types of voltage converter. Resistor-network converters will usually be advertised as supporting something like 50-1600 Watts. They are light-weight and support high-wattage electrical appliances like hair dryers and irons. However, they can only be used for short periods of time and are not ideal for digital devices. Some companies sell combination converters that include both a resistor network and a transformer in the same package. This kind of converter will usually come with a switch that switches between the two modes. If you absolutely need both types of converter, then this is the type to buy.

    Outlets in France generally accept 1 type of plug: Two round pins (see the picture). If your appliances plug has a different shape, you may need a plug adapter. Depending on how much you plan to travel in the future, it may be worthwhile to get a combination voltage converter and plug adapter.

    Two round pins system.
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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Talko to someone who knows ...

    by Jerelis Written Apr 27, 2013

    I guess we all agree on this on; there is nothing more exciting than going travelling - exploring another country, experiencing a different culture, travelling around in new ways, sampling the local cuisine and chatting to the local people for a different perspective on life.

    However during our travels we learned that there is one certain thing that you should be aware of and prepared for to make sure that the trip is as easy and enjoyable as possible. We always try to see everything once we're there, but this is not always an act of responsible travelling. We always talk to the locals and we know that they have the information about just the right spots to visit and how to undertake them. It will not only enhance your experiences but also avoid any unnecessary hassles.

    For us the travel tips we have written in this section made the most of our travel experience and we came home in the same happy, healthy state that we left.

    Related to:
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    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Münchner Kindl - one of the icons :-)

    by Trekki Updated Sep 6, 2012

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    One of Munich’s icons, apart from the famous ones like Frauenkirche and Rathaus of course, is Münchner Kindl, the one in my photo. It decorates buildings, beer coasters, beer mugs, an abundance of souvenir things, can be seen public transportation vehicles and many more. It is also part of the coat of arms of Munich however it seems that this is not widely known.

    Originally the kindl is a monk, dressed in a black coat with yellow (or gold) stripes, who holds a book in one hand and the other hand raised for the oath. According to the official sources, the monk represents the monastery of Tegernsee, which is said to be the place where “original” Munich was built. And München, the town name, is said to have derived from Mönch, the German name for monk. Over the years, the monk was somehow transformed to a kid, hence the name Kindl (German for little kid). The Italian name for Munich is Monaco, Italian for monk. As far as I know it is the only language where the name still refers to Munich’s roots.

    © Ingrid D., September 2010.

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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Who would guess that Munich = beer?

    by Trekki Updated Sep 6, 2012

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    This is more of a fun “tip”, but fits very well into Munich’s local custom section. Munich stands for beer all over the world. Why else is there an Octoberfest existing in countless countries or cities? Oh well, yes, beer is maybe the most famous icon of this town, and more so the huge beer mugs which holds one litre: the Mass.
    When we walked through Englischer Garten Saturday afternoon, I almost fell into the lake from laughing when I saw this special illumination for the beer garden in the northern part of the lake. Beer mugs, Mass, what else....

    © Ingrid D., September 2010.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    Surfing

    by iaint Written May 2, 2011

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    Well, I've seen it for myself so it's true. Surfing in downtown Munich.

    I'm told someone created this artificial wave on the fast flowing river which runs into the Englischer Garten under Prinzregentenstr. So, Saturday lunchtime at Easter the surfers are out showing off their skills.

    Only the Beach Boys missing...

    see, it's true! 2nd shot, just to be sure!
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  • claudia1975's Profile Photo

    Free Museums on Sunday

    by claudia1975 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    All state owned museums in Munich can be entered free on Sunday! This includes the “alte Pinakothek” and the “neue Pinakothek”, the “Pinakothek of modern art”. You can save a lot of entrance fees. If you are an art love you might take a whole Sunday for each, if you just want to get a first impression to come back later and see certain exhibitions in details then you can scroll two (or even three) in one day. I like the “alte Pinakothek” (get the audio guide! – each painting there has its own interesting story) and also the “Pinakothek of modern art”, which has a small but great section on architecture of famous buildings and construction principles. All the “Pinakotheken” have caffees and museum stores. Further “Sunday-free” museums include the "Bavarian national Museum", the "Munich City Museum", the "Glypothek" and others. Not included in the free offer are privately owned museums like the “Lehnbachhaus” .

    For the “Pinakotheken” exit the U2 or bus 53 at Königsplatz. Then follow the signs. By car you might find parking in the area around, but this might take some time. For detailed driving directions see www.stadtplan.de.

    Architecture of the
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  • orlikins's Profile Photo

    Fasching

    by orlikins Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    It is like the Karneval in Cologne.
    Everyone dresses up in February and gets drunk, throw confetti and glitter around Marienplatz & Viktualienmarkt and sing "Alice, Alice, Who de F*ck is Alice". People go mad, basically.
    Pity I do not have any photos of it, but it was fun. Pic is from www.serve.com

    Munich's Fasching
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    NO need to dress "Bavarian style"

    by globetrott Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    When you - as a tourist - go to Oktoberfest, you will certainly not need to dress formally ...

    For bavarian farmers outside of Munich Oktoberfest was a long time ago the only kind of entertainment, they would go to during the year, also because of the fact, that every second year Oktoberfest is combined with a big agricultural exhibition on Theresienwiese ( would there be any better excuse to go there ??:-)

    You will see plenty of bavarian people there, even whole families with several small children , all dressed in their traditional costumes...

    This pic was taken inside "KÄFER-Schenke" , a place where mostly only the Jet Set of Munich will go !

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  • orlikins's Profile Photo

    Bavarian words & phrases...

    by orlikins Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Radler - a beer shandy, in North Germany, it's known as Alsterwasser.

    Geh' ma - 'let's go', 'come on'

    Auf Wiederschauen - like Auf Wiedersehen (see you later)

    Wiesn - Another term for the Oktoberfest

    Hendl Hoch! - Raise your chicken! (only used at the oktoberfest, when the bandmaster shouts Hendl hoch, you raise your chicken piece, like a toast!)

    Ein Maß - 1 litre of beer.

    Servus! and Gruss Gott - typical Bavarian greetings - you will NEVER hear this in North Germany, unless you're talking to a Bavarian. You'll hear it in Austria too.

    Gucken, schauen - both mean 'to look'

    Bavarian flag

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  • Sirvictor's Profile Photo

    Drink Brüderlein Beer instead of Water

    by Sirvictor Updated Sep 23, 2010

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    Germans of Munich drink bier like a barrel in huge bier glasses. I am not used it. For that reason I drink only a "kleines" little. There was also brass music in the halle but it was too noisy. For that reason we find ourselves a remote place in one of the endless corridors. I think the Munchener had the idea to build a hugu bier halle after seeing our covered bazaars in Turkey. the Kapali Carcis. hi hi hi

    A drink of Love A grosses drink Prost Thomas Zimmermann, Edit Tasnadi,eg��szs��g��re This time not the Raki the lion milk but Beer. Without words, Clever understands.
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Munich Local Customs

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