Nymphenburg Palace, Munich

4.5 out of 5 stars 111 Reviews

Schloß Nymphenburg 1, 80638 Munich +49 - 89 - 17908-0
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  • Chinggis_n_Borte's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg Palace

    by Chinggis_n_Borte Written Dec 21, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our accommodation, Hotel Laimer Hof in Laimer strasse was about a two minute walk from Nymphenburg Palace.

    The Palace is in the west of Munich, and only about 15 minutes by public transport from the city centre. The nearest S-Bahn station is "Laim" station. And from Laim, there is a bus to "Schloss Nymphenburg". The nearest U-Bahn (underground) station is "Rotkreuzplatz", from which it is possible to take a tram to "Schloss Nymphenburg".

    The prices of admission differ depending on the season, and depending on whether you have a concession or not. We of course did not have a concession.

    Going in November, it was classified as “Winter” and there were not as many parts accessible to the public. The park palaces were not open, for example, and because of this, the admission fee was cheaper. It cost us 8,50 Euros for a combination ticket.

    Fortunately, unlike at the Hermitage in St Petersburg Russia there is no difference in the price for citizens and non-citizens. Foreigners pay the same price as Germans at Nymphenburg Palace.

    The costs are as follows:
    Combination ticket "Nymphenburg"
    1 April-15 October:
    11.50 euros regular / 9 euros for concession

    16 October-31 March:
    8.50 euros regular / 6.50 euros for concession

    With this ticket you can visit the palace, the Marstallmuseum (carriages and sleighs), the Museum of Nymphenburg Porcelain and the park palaces (Amalienburg, Badenburg, Pagodenburg, Magdalenenklause). In winter the park palaces are closed.

    Nymphenburg Palace only:
    6 euros regular / 5 euros for concession

    The palace was commissioned by the prince-electoral couple Ferdinand Maria and Henriette Adelaide of Savoy in 1664 after the birth of their son Maximilian II Emanuel.

    The central pavilion was completed in 1675.

    The architect they commissioned to design the palace was Italian architect Agostino Barell

    The official website of the Palace is http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/palace/index.htm

    The castle was gradually expanded and transformed over the years.

    Starting in 1701, Max Emanuel, the heir to Bavaria, a sovereign electorate of the Holy Roman Empire, undertook a systematic extension of the palace.

    With the Treaty of Nymphenburg signed in July 1741, Charles Albert allied with France and Spain against Austria.

    Two of his children were born at Nymphenburg Palace: Maria Antonia (future Electress of Saxony) in 1724 and Maria Anna Josepha (future Margravine of Baden-Baden) in 1734.

    For a long time, the palace was the favourite summer residence of the rulers of Bavaria.

    King Max I Joseph died there in 1825, and his great-grandson King Ludwig II was born there in 1845.

    Today, Nymphenburg is open to the public, but also continues to be a home and chancery for the head of the house of Wittelsbach, currently Franz, Duke of Bavaria.

    There are detailed directions on the website pasted below in the "General Area or Directions" section.

    Directions: http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/tourist/howtoget.htm
    The link above has driving directions and public transport directions.
    Nymphenburg is in the west of Munich.

    Phone: +49 (0) 89 - 1 79 08-0

    Website: http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/palace/index.htm

    Schloss Nymphenburg in Autumn Schloss Nymphenburg in Autumn Royal Carriage Palace Room Schloss Nymphenburg grounds
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg castle

    by globetrott Updated Aug 22, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Schloss Nymphenburg was the summer-residence of the Bavarian kings and the birthplace of "mad" king Ludwig II.

    Nymphenburg is one of the most beautiful baroque castles in Europe with a large baroque garden around it.
    You will need the whole day in order to see all the various smaller castles and other places of interest in the large park around the palace of Nymphenburg - you may as well have a look on my seperate page about "Schlosspark Nymphenburg" - just click on my link below !!

    Directions: Tram Nr.17 and Bus Nr.41 will take you to the castle !

    my SELFmade postcard of Nymphenburg castle
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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Schloss Nymphenburg

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 7, 2013

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    This huge structure was started in 1664 and continuend to be expanded well into the 19th Century. It has been used constantly since by Bavarian and Hofburg royalty and still today belong to the house of Wittelsbach, the last Bavarian royal family. It would be impossible either in text or pictures to describe just how enormous this place is.

    Address: Schloss- und Gartenverwaltung Nymphenburg

    Website: http://www.schloesser.bayern.de/englisch/palace/objects/ny_schl.htm

    Schloss Nymphenburg Schloss Nymphenburg Schloss Nymphenburg Schloss Nymphenburg Schloss Nymphenburg
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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Schloss Nymphenburg

    by antistar Updated Aug 14, 2013

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    The Nymphenburg palace just outside Munich's city center is magnificent, but it has even more magnificent gardens. These become a little world of their own, with rivers, waterfalls, follies, and even little villages to discover in among the trees and leaves. The palace was once the country home of the Wittelsbachs, which they'd escape to when they wanted to get away from the city. Now it has become subsumed within the city itself, and is easily reached by tram from the city center.

    The buildings were started in 1664 and took over a century and a half to complete. They are as vast as they are extravagant, and pictures do not do their majesty justice. You need to see a video of the palace to get an idea of its grandeur. And this is just the buildings. Stretching out the back of the palace is a park of over 200 hectares (500 acres). This park requires at least an afternoon to wander around, just to get a glimpse of what it contains. The whole journey should feel somewhat of an adventure. When I was there the buildings in the park would appear eerily out of the mist, creating a magical feel.

    Directions: Take Tram 17 from the center, and keep an eye out on your left for the palace. Get off at the next stop.

    Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich Swan, Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich Schloss Nymphenburg, Munich

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    Schloss Nymphenburg

    by IreneMcKay Written Aug 10, 2013

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    The Nymphenburg Palace was commissioned in 1664 by Elector Ferdinand Maria, to celebrate the birth of his son, Maximilian Emanuel. Later in 1770 Maximilian Emanuel, the young man for whom the castle was built, made additions to it. He added galleries and pavilions, extending the sides of the Palace.

    We did not go inside the palace. We walked to it via a little building surrounded with statues and containing the statue of a stag in its centre and also via its long canal. Then we wandered its pond and statue filled gardens.

    Schloss Nymphenburg. Schloss Nymphenburg. Schloss Nymphenburg. Schloss Nymphenburg. Schloss Nymphenburg.
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  • Trekki's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg Castle & park: great for morning walks

    by Trekki Updated Aug 4, 2013

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    For the time being I can’t write much about the castle itself or its interior, because I was here only briefly, for an early Sunday morning walk with Richie. But this is something I enjoyed very much, so that’s my suggestion:
    On a sunny morning anytime of the year go there as early as possible to have advantage of the lovely morning light setting and of an almost empty park. Don’t enter through one of the side gates but from the east, with full view of the castle itself (see here, panorama of the castle). This is where you will arrive when you take the streetcar no 17 (get off “Schloß Nymphenburg”) and walk along the little canal that ends at the outer castle pond. We were only in the southern park but I really loved it. And of course with Richie being a good guide, I saw all the little bits and pieces of buildings hidden in the forest.

    For a park plan, click => here. That’s the castle website with more information about the park and the buildings, in English.

    Directions:
    This depends how and from where you arrive. We came by bus no. 51 from Laim. For details see => park website “how to get there”.

    Location of Schloß Nymphenburg (entrance) on Google Maps.

    © Ingrid D., September 2012 (So please do not copy my text or photos without my permission.)

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Nymphenburg-the park

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 26, 2012

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    It is large at 490 acres, and was first in Italian style for a garden; later changed to English style in early 1800's. It has many winding lanes to traverse, and along the way see the unique and elegant hunting "lodges", or smaller palaces on the grounds. There are two main ponds that extend far into the park area.

    Panorama of buildings on the grounds View looking to the back of palace Flowers in garden near palace Lilac bushes near the palace buildings

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    Nymphenburg-Magdalenerklause

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 26, 2012

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    This is built as a hermitage in 1725-28. The theme was to make the building and surroundings look like it was a place where a hermit would live; thereby the outside facade is in half ruin appearance. The south end has a grotto of of St. Mary Magdalene, as well as the entry hall. These are works of art using sea shells, rough fabricated stone look, and figurines standing out of them.
    The north is the Elector apartments, small as they were, decorated with oak panels and copper engravings.

    Website: http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/p-palaces/magdalen.htm

    Rustic appearance of the outside Grotto of Mary Magdalene as anchor Close up view of grotto ceiling decor View of alter through the oak decor
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    Nymphenburg-Pagodenburg

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 26, 2012

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    It was built in 1716-19 at the direction of Max Emanuel. The magnificent blue and white tiles of Dutch origin are displayed throughout the small building. It was to be a respite for the weary after playing "Mailspiel game" (whatever that is). The main hall is in great splendor, and the upper rooms have a Chinese motif, and a Boudoir to take a rest. It is a most unique structure. At this time it was vogue to emulate and replicate the Chinese styles; called chinoiserie.

    Website: http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/p-palaces/pagoden.htm

    Blue & white ceiling with Entry at the front Chinese room in second floor
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    Nymphenburg-BAdenburg

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 26, 2012

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    This 18th century building constructed under the rein of Max Emanuel features the banquet hall with elaborate stucco works and frescoes. One stand out is a two story bath Hall; like a pool to us today. It too four years to build; 1718-22 by the plans of Joseph Effner. The hall in the middle is also a great feature, the banqueting hall

    Website: http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/p-palaces/baden.htm

    BAnquet hall ceiling and stucco Chinese wallpaper in rooms BAth Hall decorated walls
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    Nymphenburg-Amailenburg

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 26, 2012

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    This was to be used as a "pleasure palace" and hunting lodge for Karl Albert's wife; Maria Amalia. It is Rococo style architecture and was constructed in 1754. Francois Cuvillies designed this building. The large Hall of Mirrors in the center is fabulous and you can see yourself coming and going. There also is a Blue cabinet and bedroom, yellow room, and a hunting room and pheasant room; all opulent and elegant. The stucco and silver to designate wealth and class standing is displayed throughout. Even the kitchen of blue and silver tile is beyond the top in decoration.

    Website: http://www.schloss-nymphenburg.de/englisch/p-palaces/amalien.htm

    Front of the Richly decorated bedroom Hall of Mirrors stucco design
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    Nymphenburg Palace-Marstallmuseum

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 26, 2012

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    Not enough can be said for this unique museum of carriages, sleighs, and other transport modes. It is on the west wing of the palace, and the entry is separate. I do not think a lot of people are aware how precious this tour is; it surpasses the palace room tour, in my opinion-which is valuable to me. The exhibits also includes porcelain pieces and many rein, harnesses and pictures of famed horses.
    The coach house was built by Maximilian I on the east side, but by WWII the items in the museum first exhibited in 1923 were moved to current location. The war destroyed a lot of the area, and it reopened in 1952. The collection is of 18th-19th century transport carriages that onlyh the royals could make so opulent.
    Fee to enter is Euro 4,50, but a combo ticket is 11,50 Euro for all museums/buildings. It is open 9-5 daily.

    Coronation coach of 1818 State coach used 1870-71 by King Ludwig Elaborate coash of 1800's Coronation coach of Max Joseph I in 1818 Sleighs ro slide in style
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    Nymphenburg-main palace buildings

    by BruceDunning Written Jun 26, 2012

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    This is one magnificent place. The compound that was occupied by the Wittelsbach families is "huge" to say the least; or most. It was the summer residence to allow the rulers to get away from the town people in the square where the Residence is located. The palace is 2100 feet long and is segregated into 3 sections; all styled in Baroque, but some interiors were redesigned in later years Rococo or Neoclassical. The park is 490 acres (200 hectares), and holds the "smaller" palaces/retreats of Pagodenburg, Badenburg, Amalienburg, and a Magdalenenklaus meditation retreat. Elector Ferdinand and wife Henrietta Adailade had this built in 1664 to commemorate the birth of the son; but only the main building in the center was first to be constructed. Max Emanuel expanded to add the wings in 1701, which got completed in 1715.

    There is a self guided, and no guided tours of the main palace rooms; about 8-10 rooms in all. Entry to this is Euro 6. A combo ticket cost Eruo 11,50 and that includes the outlying buildings. It is open 9-5 daily

    Address: Notburasstrsse

    Directions: To the northwest of the city center about 3 miles

    Website: http://www.schloesser.bayern.de/englisch/palace/objects/ny_schl.htm

    Panoram view of palace buildings Ceiling in Great Hall Great hall-Steinerner Saal Royal bedroom
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    Nymphenburg - Big Palace

    by BruceDunning Updated Jun 23, 2012

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    This is one magnificent place. The compound that was occupied by the Wittelsbach families is "huge" to say the least; or most. It was the summer residence to allow the rulers to get away from the town people in the square where the Residence is located. The palace is 2100 feet long and is segregated into 3 sections; all styled in Baroque, but some interiors were redesigned in later years Rococo or Neoclassical. The park is 490 acres (200 hectares), and holds the "smaller" palaces/retreats of Pagodenburg, Badenburg, Amalienburg, and a Magdalenenklaus meditation retreat.

    The buildings are in great shape and the grounds beautiful.

    A huge panorama layout Another view of one wing Royal bedroom mirrored gold room Sprawling compound of Nymphenburg
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    Amazing Nymphenberg Palace

    by TooTallFinn24 Written Dec 7, 2011

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    What struck me first when arriving at Schloss Nymphenburg is the enormity of its width. The palace which began construction in 1664 is now over 700 meters wide. To even get a picture of the entire front baroque facade you practically have to stand back on the street.

    We took the palace and garden tour only. The palace itself contains rooms with styles from three different periods; baroque, rococo, and neoclassical. Some of the ceiling frescos had been well preserved or recreated. One of my favorite rooms which was the Gallery of Beauties in the south pavilion. King Ludwig I had the portriats of all his many affairs hung in this room.

    The park and the garden are worth a long walk. The garden was originally an Italian style garden but was redone in the early 19th century by Prince Charles Theodore. The park is divided by a long canal which begins near the palace and extends out to the statues of the Greek gods.

    We did not tour the carriage house or the factory on the first floor.

    Directions: The palace can be accessed from downtown Munich by taking Tram Line # 17.

    Front View of Nymphenburg Palace Ceiling Fresco On Second Floor of Palace Guest Quarters Canal That Runs Along Garden

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Comments (1)

  • Jan 16, 2013 at 1:16 AM

    The Nymphenburg palace looks so great in the sunshine. We took the hop on hop off to travel there. Or lunch break we took at the Hirschgarden which is near the Nymphenburg palace. There you can see some deer while having some traditional Bavarian food! It was fun!