Schloss Charlottenburg - Charlottenburg Palace, Berlin

4 out of 5 stars 61 Reviews

Spandauer Damm 20-24, 14059 Berlin 320 91-1
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  • Schloss and Schlosspark Charlottenburg
    Schloss and Schlosspark Charlottenburg
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  • Schlosspark Charlottenburg
    Schlosspark Charlottenburg
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  • Belvedere im Schlosspark Charlottenburg
    Belvedere im Schlosspark Charlottenburg
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    Schloss and Schlosspark Charlottenburg

    by lotharscheer Updated Aug 15, 2016

    The Schloss Charlottenburg was built for Queen Sophie Charlotte as a summer residence in 1695 to 1713. Friedrich the Great had it extended in 1740 to 42. The garden is partly formal and partly english (with statues to Friedrich's liking hiding inbehind the trees).
    In the Belvedere (this is not the Schloss Belvedere) you can see very nice porcellan collection.
    Open from 10 am to 5 pm, in summer 10 am to 6 pm, entrance fee is € 12, the garden is free.

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Website: http://www.spsg.de/schloesser-gaerten/objekt/schloss-charlottenburg-altes-schloss/

    Schlosspark Charlottenburg Schlosspark Charlottenburg Neuer Pavillon Belvedere im Schlosspark Charlottenburg Schloss and Schlosspark Charlottenburg
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    Charlottenburg Palace in Autumn

    by Chinggis_n_Borte Updated Dec 16, 2015

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    Our accommodation was in the suburb of Charlottenburg, and in walking distance from Charlottenburg Palace, or Schloss Charlottenburg in German.

    On 27 October, we decided to take advantage of our close proximity to the Palace and the lovely weather, and visit the Palace.

    Being Autumn, the trees on the Palace grounds were in stunning colours of bright yellow and some orange.

    The original palace was commissioned by Sophie Charlotte, the wife of Friedrich III, Elector of Brandenburg in what was then the village of Lietzow.

    Inside the Palace was a room described as "the eighth wonder of the world", the Amber Room (Bernsteinzimmer), a room with its walls surfaced in decorative amber.

    It was designed by Andreas Schlüter and its construction by the Danish amber craftsman Gottfried Wolfram started in 1701.

    Friedrich Wilhelm I gave the Amber Room to Russian Tsar Peter the Great as a present in 1716.

    The Amber Room was installed in Catherine Palace Tsarskoye Selo near St Petersburg, where Borte went in 2013.

    The Nazi invaders dismantled the Amber Room and stole it. To this day the stolen amber has not been recovered, but it was thought earlier this year that it may be on an abandoned train discovered in Poland. That has not been confirmed yet. The Soviet Union reconstructed the Amber Room at Catherine Palace at incredible expense. I still think it is ironic that so much money is spent by a Communist regime on a royal palace, when it was the Communists who overthrew the last Tsar and assassinated the entire family.

    SOPHIA CHARLOTTE

    As a girl, Sophia Charlotte visited the Kingdom of France with her mother in hopes of marrying the "Grand Dauphin" Louis, heir to the French throne. He later married Duchess Maria Anna Victoria of Bavaria instead, but Sophia Charlotte was also proposed as a possible bride for Louis' father, King Louis XIV, after he lost his wife in 1683. Nothing came of this plan either.

    A marriage to Frederick of Hohenzollern, son of the "Great Elector" Frederick William of Brandenburg and heir of both Electoral Brandenburg and the Duchy of Prussia, was therefore arranged.

    By marrying Frederick on 8 October 1684, she became Electress of Brandenburg in 1688, and after the elevation of Brandenburg-Prussia to a kingdom in 1701, she became the first Queen in Prussia.

    Her only child to reach maturity became King Frederick William I of Prussia.

    Whilst on a visit to her mother in Hanover, Sophia Charlotte died of pneumonia on 21 January 1705, when she was only 36 years of age.

    FREDRICK OF HOHENZOLLERN

    Fredrick was a Hohenzollern (the same family line as Kaiser Wilhelm II, the last King of Germany).

    The Hohenzollern state was then known as Brandenburg-Prussia.

    Although he was the Margrave and Prince-elector of Brandenburg and the Duke of Prussia, Frederick desired the more prestigious title of king.

    However, according to Germanic law at that time, no kingdoms could exist within the Holy Roman Empire, with the exception of the Kingdom of Bohemia.

    Frederick persuaded Leopold I, Archduke of Austria and Holy Roman Emperor, to allow Prussia to be elevated to a kingdom.

    This agreement was given in exchange for an alliance against King Louis XIV in the War of the Spanish Succession.

    Frederick argued that Prussia had never been part of the Holy Roman Empire, and he ruled over it with full sovereignty.

    Therefore, he said, there was no legal or political barrier to letting him rule it as a kingdom.

    Frederick crowned himself on 18 January 1701 in Königsberg.

    Although he did so with the Emperor's consent, and also with formal acknowledgement from Augustus II the Strong, Elector of Saxony, who held the title of King of Poland, the Polish-Lithuanian Diet (Sejm) raised objections, and viewed the coronation as illegal.

    In fact, according to the terms of the Treaty of Wehlau and Bromberg, the House of Hohenzollern's sovereignty over the Duchy of Prussia was not absolute but contingent on the continuation of the male line (in the absence of a male heir, the duchy would revert to the Polish crown).

    Therefore, out of deference to the region's historic ties to the Polish crown, Frederick made the symbolic concession of calling himself "King in Prussia" instead of "King of Prussia."

    Legally, the Hohenzollern state was still a personal union between Brandenburg and Prussia.

    However, by the time Frederick crowned himself as king, the emperor's authority over Brandenburg (and the rest of the empire) was only nominal, and in practice it soon came to be treated as part of the Prussian kingdom rather than as a separate entity.

    His grandson, Frederick the Great, was the first Prussian king to formally style himself "King of Prussia" rather than “King in Prussia”.

    Frederick was married three times, first to Elizabeth Henrietta of Hesse-Kassel, with whom he had one child Louise Dorothea, born 1680.

    Then he married Sophia Charlotte of Hanover, with whom he had Frederick August (1685–1686) and Frederick William I, born in 1688, who succeeded him.

    And in 1708, Frederick married Sophia Louise of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, who survived him but had no children by him.

    Frederick died in Berlin in 1713 and is entombed in the Berliner Dom.

    Originally named Lietzenburg, the inauguration of the palace was celebrated on 11 July 1699, Frederick's 42nd birthday.

    The palace was badly damaged in 1943 during the Second World War. However, it was rebuilt to its former condition. From 2004 until early 2006, Charlottenburg Palace was the seat of the President of Germany, whilst Schloss Bellevue was being renovated.

    The trees on the palace grounds are splendid in Autumn.

    The address is Spandauer 10, Charlottenburg, Berlin.

    The closest U-bahn is Richard-Wagner Platz on the U7 line. Take Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    When you walk across the street from the palace, there are buildings which were taken over by the Nazi Regime.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Spandauer 10,

    schloss Charlottenburg Autumn at Charlottenburg Palace Japanese bridge at Charlottenburg autumn trees at Charlottenburg Palace
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    Belvedere Porcelain Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Nov 20, 2015

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    Photos:
    1. The Belvedere at Charlottenburg Palace
    2. Porcelain in a padded box for safe storage
    3. Porcelain on display in the museum

    The Belvedere in the park behind Charlottenburg Palace was first built as a lookout pavilion in 1788 by the architect Carl Gotthard Langhans for King Frederick William II of Prussia.

    Since 1971 this has been the site of the KPM Porcelain Collection of the city of Berlin. KPM stands for "Königliche Porzellan Manufaktur" or Royal Porcelain Manufacturing, which was formed in 1763 when two private porcelain companies were taken over by the king.

    Even for a paper-plate kind of person like me, this is a very impressive collection and well worth the 3 Euro admission charge (2.50 if you get a discount).

    The opening hours from April to October are 10.00 to 18.00, but during the winter only from 12.00 to 16.00. Closed Mondays.

    Address: Spandauer Damm 20-24, 14059 Berlin

    Directions: GPS 52°31'39.08" North; 13°17'43.15" East

    Phone: 030.32 09 14 45

    Website: http://www.spsg.de/index.php?id=138

    1. The Belvedere at Charlottenburg Palace 2. Porcelain in a padded box for safe storage 3. Porcelain on display in the museum
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    Charlottenburg Palace

    by Nemorino Updated Nov 20, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Photos:
    1. Charlottenburg Palace
    2. Statue in the palace garden
    3. The palace from a bridge in the garden
    4. Walking towards the palace on Schlossstraße = Palace Street

    From the excellent English-language audio guide we learned that this palace was originally built by Elector Frederick III as a summer residence for his wife Sophie Charlotte in 1699. It was later expanded into a royal palace after Frederick became the first Prussian King, Friedrich I.

    The palace was severely damaged by allied bombing in 1943, but was carefully reconstructed after the war.

    Behind the palace is a large park which was originally a formal French Baroque garden. In the 18th and 19th centuries it was gradually transformed into an English-style landscape garden. After the Second World War a small part right behind the palace was again laid out in the original French style.

    Address: Spandauer Damm 10-22, 14059 Berlin

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210
    GPS 52°31'13.66" North; 13°17'44.65" East

    Phone: 030 32 09 11

    Website: http://www.spsg.de/index.php?id=134

    1. Charlottenburg Palace 2. Statue in the palace garden 3. The palace from a bridge in the garden 4. Walking towards the palace on Schlossstra��e
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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Charlottenburg palace

    by Raimix Written Sep 29, 2013

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    Charlottenburg is the largest palace in Berlin, used by Hohenzollern family. It was built as a summer residence for Sophie Charlotte, in 1695 - 1699. After a few years palace was expanded, it was one of the great examples of baroque in Berlin. During Second World War it was almost completely destroyed, but now it is presented with a former look, fully reconstructed. It houses picture gallery.

    Charlottenburg park is also projected as baroque one, but. in my opinion, it is not so special.

    It was a place to prove that Berlin is not only modern - looking town.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg.

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210.

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  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Charlottenburg Palace

    by shavy Written Sep 1, 2013

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    Charlottenburg Castle is the largest castle in Berlin it was built at the end of the 17th century by order of Elector Frederick, who would be crowned as King Frederick I. later He built it as a summer residence for his wife, Sophie-Charlotte shortly after completion the palace was expanded with the Orangerie was a dome tower added later became the eastern wing

    For the original furniture is not much left this is because the lock was almost completely destroyed in World War II. Schloss Charlottenburg is the largest palace in Berlin and one of the most popular attractions

    The park surrounding the castle was built on the model of the gardens at the Palace of Versailles in this park is a villa (a belvedere) where a fine collection of porcelain can be seen

    Address: : Spandauer Damm 10-22

    Charlottenburg Palace

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    The Mausoleum

    by alancollins Written Jul 3, 2013

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    In the gardens of the Charlottenburg Palace are a number of buildings, one of those is the mausoleum. The doric temple was commissioned by Frederick William III to house his consort Queen Luise after her death in 1810. The mausoleum has been extended twice starting in 1840 when Frederick William III died and again in 1894, it was damaged during WW2 but was repaired over a period of 13 years The mausoleum contains a number sarcophagi of various members of the royal family. The mausoleum is tucked away to the south-west of the Belvedere and is open to the public from April to October, Tuesday - Sunday, 10 am - 6 pm and is closed on Mondays and it cost 2€ to enter.

    Address: Spandauer Damm 20-24, 14059 Berlin

    Directions: See the website for transport options

    Website: http://www.spsg.de/?id=134

    The Mausoleum The Mausoleum
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    Charlottenburg Palace

    by alancollins Updated Aug 26, 2012

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    Charlottenburg Palace is now the largest palace in the Berlin Area. Construction work started in 1695 for a new summer residence for Sophie Charlotte who was the wife of Friedrich III, Elector of Brandenburg. After his wife died in 1705 Friedrich named the palace and surrounding estate Charlottenburg in memory of Sophie Charlotte. Over the years the palace which started with only the cental section was gradually expanded with a frontage of 505 metres and the extensive gardens laid out. During WW2 the palace was severely damaged but has now been fully restored to its former glory.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Phone: +49 (0)331.96 94-200

    Website: http://www.spsg.de/index.php?id=134

    Front of the Palace Palace & Gardens Palace Gardens Lake with Palace in the background One of the Palace Wings
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  • Skibbe's Profile Photo

    Charlottenburg Palace

    by Skibbe Updated Sep 5, 2011

    This was built in 1699 by Friedrich I as a summer palace for his wife Sophia Charlotte. Later rulers also used it and added to it. It is a gorgeous and fascinating place even if you just see the original section, as I did.

    Directions: Far western area of Berlin.

    Website: http://www.berlin.de/orte/museum/schloss-charlottenburg/index.en.php

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    Sophie Charlotte's Summer Palace

    by iblatt Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Do you feel like getting away from the remnants of 20th century history to the early days of the Electors of Brandenburg? Charlottenburg Palace is the place to visit. It's the largest palace in Berlin; its construction started in 1695: Elector Frederick III had it built as a summer palace for his wide, Sophie Charlotte, and called it "Lietzenburg Pleasure Palace". After Sophie Charlotte's death it was named after her. Construction actually took place in several stages, spanning over 100 years, beginning with the central section, then the central tower, then the wings, the orangerie, the annexes...

    In the coutryard there is an impressive Baroque statue of the Great Elector, Frederick William of Brandenburg, founder of the State of Brandenburg and Prussia, on horseback. You can see his frightened enemies almost trampled by his horse. This statue was commissioned by the Great Elector's son, Frederick III, to honor his father, and was unveiled on July 12th, 1703, the Elector's birthday. It used to stand elsewhere, was removed in 1943 and sent on board a ship for safety, but the ship was overloaded and sank in Tegel Harbor. After the statue was recovered, it was relocated to the courtyard of Charlottenburg Palace, which seems the natural setting for it.

    The palace tour leads you through the historic apartments of Frederick I, Sophie Charlotte and Frederick the Great, with stucco decorations, antique furniture, paintings, porcelain, chinoiserie...

    There is free entrance to the park behind the palace, a landscape garden reconstructed after WWII, with a small part laid out in French style resembling the earlier layout of the original park.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Phone: 320 91-1

    Frederick the Great's statue,Charlottenburg Palace Charlottenburg Palace Charlottenburg Palace courtyard Charlottenburg Palace by night
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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Charlottenburg Castle

    by mvtouring Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A place that I really wanted to visit as it was highly recommended by my friends who live in Berlin. The castle was built by King Friedrich II of Prussia for his wife Charlotte. It is filled with a grand art collection, and provides a glimpse into the life of Friedrich II and Charlotte, their fellow Prussian nobility, and other German history.

    You must leave any bags you have with an attendant . NO PHOTOS are allowed inside, but you can snap as many as you want of the beautiful park that surrounds the castle. Ensure that you have enough time to enjoy the gardens as well, they are well worth a nice stroll.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Phone: 320 91-1

    Charlottenburg

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  • der_geograf's Profile Photo

    The first place I visited in Berlin!

    by der_geograf Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    My feet hadn't even been on the beautiful Berlin soil more than an hour before I was on my way to see the Schloß Charlottenburg!

    When I was first researching for my trip to Berlin, I knew I wanted to see it badly, and I wasn't disappointed. It was built by King Friedrich II of Prussia for his wife Charlotte. It is filled with a grand art collection, and provides a glimpse into the life of Friedrich II and Charlotte, their fellow Prussian nobility, and other German history.

    Admission price was "reasonable," and you must leave any bags you have with an attendant (and we had no problems with anything being stolen). NO PHOTOS are allowed inside, but you can snap as many as you want of the beautiful park that surrounds the castle. (A good place to make good use of your jogging shoes, too.)

    Enjoy it!

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Phone: 320 91-1

    Schlo�� Charlottenburg, Berlin, Germany
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    A moment of pleasure

    by Igraine Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    After all the grim and rather depressing world war II and East german sites and of course all the rain it was a real pleasure to have some sun and see the Schloss Charlottenburg. Built late 17th century, its a good looking baroque palace with even better looking halls, rooms, hallways etc etc. Excellent for a look at how things were in these days. A stroll through would have been very nice too but sadly enough we didnt have time for that.

    Inside its palace wings are also exhibitions rooms for changing exhibtions and a "troje museum", which shows some findings from Schliemanns excavation expedition to Troje.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Phone: 320 91-1

    Statue of Friederich IIi
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    Schloß Charlottenburg

    by alexberlin Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Schloß Charlottenburg, the largest and most beautiful palace in Berlin, is a shining example of baroque architecture.
    It was built from 1695–99 as a summer residence for Sophie Charlotte, the consort of Elector Friedrich III., to plans by Johann Arnold Nering and Martin Grünberg, though at first only the central part was actually built. In 1701, after the coronation of the Elector as King Friedrich I. of Prussia, the palace was extended by Eosander von Göthe in the style of the palace at Versailles: the main building was extended and side axes were created around the courtyard. In addition, the Great Orangery was constructed on the western wing, while a domed tower with tambour crowned the main building. Knobelsdorff constructed the eastern wing from 1740–46. From1787–91, Carl Langhans constructed the palace theatre as an extension to the orangery wing.
    The palace was badly damaged during the WWII, and rebuilding work began in the 50th. The splendor of the Berlin Baroque is particularly apparent in the Great Oak Gallery, a banqueting hall with magnificent carvings which was completed in 1713, and the Porcelain Room, with its valuable collection of Chinese and Japanese china. Other impressive rooms include the banqueting halls from 1740–47, the White Room and the Golden Gallery, a rococo room in soft pastel tones with rich golden ornamentation. The former theatre is now the home of the Museum for Pre- and Early History, whose most famous exhibits come from Heinrich Schliemann's excavations at Troy.
    The palace park grounds, one of the most idyllic oases in the city, is a favored spot for both tourists and Berliners. The park features a mausoleum constructed by Schinkel in the style of a temple, which contains amongst other the sarcophagi of Queen Luise and Friedrich Wilhelm II., designed by Christian Daniel Rauch. The belvedere, formerly a teahouse and built by Langhans at the same time as the theatre, now displays an exhibition on the history of royal porcelain manufacture.

    Address: Luisenplatz, 14059 Berlin

    Phone: +49331969402

    Charlottenburg

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    Schloss Charlottenburg

    by Roadquill Updated Feb 8, 2011

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    At one time, a long, long time ago, in a world we no longer know, the Schloss Charlottenburg would have been the showcase it was designed to be. I monument to having more money than Toyota or Bill Gates. Walking through the Schloss is certianly worth the time. It is a very pretty place, with wonderful rooms and exhibitions of life in the luxury lane. The down side is that they don't allow pictures inside the Schloss.

    Address: Luisenplatz 1, Berlin-Charlottenburg

    Directions: Bus X9, 109, 145, 210

    Phone: 320 91-1

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