Weesenstein Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by german_eagle
  • Things to Do
    by german_eagle
  • Things to Do
    by german_eagle

Most Recent Things to Do in Weesenstein

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    Garden

    by german_eagle Updated May 18, 2013

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    A must is the visit of the beautiful garden. First mentioned in the 16th century it was redone in French Baroque style in the 18th century.

    You'll find beautiful sculptures, two bridges crossing the Müglitz river and several monuments - and lots of blooming flowers of course! Focus of the part beyond the Müglitz river is a Baroque pavillion, currently with an exhibit on the terrible flood in 2002.

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    Catholic Chapel

    by german_eagle Updated May 18, 2013

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    When castle Weesenstein became the favourite place of King Johann he gave order to build a catholic chapel (unlike the Saxon people, who are in the majority Lutheran-Evangelics, the Saxon Rulers were catholic since August the Strong converted to Catholizism to become King of Poland).

    In 1840 the former bakery was rebuilt as a catholic chapel in Romantic style. The altar dates from the 12th/13th century, the pieta is a wonderful work of Ernst Rietschel.

    Catholic Chapel
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    Court Hall (Gerichtsstube)

    by german_eagle Updated May 18, 2013

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    The biggest and most beautiful of the medieval vaults is the court hall (Gerichtsstube). A beauty is the bookcase from the 16th century. Jurisdiction was assigned to the Bünaus in 1455, since then the Court of Weesenstein had its seat in this hall.

    The room has late Gothic doorframes and deep recesses with window seats. Narrow stairs lead up to the churchyard, half way up is a tiny room to the side (pic 4), probably the jail.

    Gerichtsstube
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    Knight's Hall

    by german_eagle Updated May 18, 2013

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    Although the name "Rittersaal" (Knight's Hall) was given in the romantic period of the 19th century, it is true that the oldest parts of this room were built in medieval times.

    As you can see it today it is a mixture of several construction phases: Gothic relics (fireplace), walls and frescos from the Renaissance (shortly after 1600), Baroque decoration from the 18th century.

    Paintings from the 16th century depict former patrons of the Bünau family who owned the castle for centuries. One is Rudolf II von Bünau, who passed away around 1540 and was buried in the castle church in nearby Decin, another of his properties. The other painting depicts Günter von Bünau, who commissioned the amazing epitaph, one of the finest works of art in late Renaissance style, in the parish church in nearby Lauenstein.

    Knight's Hall
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    Salettchen

    by german_eagle Updated May 18, 2013

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    The entrance of the residential apartment floor is marked by the "Salettchen", a mid-size hall.

    The decoration is originally preserved from the middle of the 19th century. The room is dedicated to King Johann of Saxony. The vault paintings depict his passions, Poetry and Justice. The magnificently decorated vault and the paintings on the wall in Neo-Renaissance style are influenced by architect Gottfried Semper.

    Salettchen
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    Bridge and portal of the castle

    by german_eagle Updated May 18, 2013

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    When entering the castle the magnificent portal catches the visitor's eye. The portal was created in 1575 in Renaissance style. It depicts the coat-of-arms of the owner at that time, Rudolf III. of Bünau and his wife Christiane of Schleinitz, as well as those of his parents and parents-in-law.

    A bridge spans the little canal that leads to the mill below the castle (pic 4); from the bridge in front of the portal you have a wonderful view of the garden (pic 5).

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    The Culprit: Müglitz River

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    Who'd think that such an innocent-looking little stream was capable of causing a disaster like the one of August 2002?

    The 2002 flood was not the first that hit Weesenstein. It probably won't have been the last either...

    M��glitz river M��glitz river
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    Flutpanorama: Exhibition On The 2002 Flood

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    The villagers of Weesenstein have also done an exhibition on the disastrous flood of August 2002. It is located in a small building along the road to the train station. The exhibition shows photos and videos, background information and original items found in the mud and debris. Whoever watched the German news in those days will recall the pictures from Weesenstein.

    The front room of the building contains an old mangle machine which can still be used by the locals to press their laundry.

    Directions: Watch out for the small building with the sign "Flutpanorama" on the roof. The door at the back side is the entrance. Press the button next to the door to enter.

    Exhibition at the Flutpanorama Flutpanorama building

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    Recalling The 2002 Flood

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    Disaster struck on August 12/13, 2002 when, after heavy rainfalls in the Ore Mountains, the little Müglitz stream turned into a destructive flood wave. The board shows what Weesenstein's centre had looked like before the flood, and the fate of every single house. All those that have a red dot have either been destroyed completely or damaged so badly that they had to be torn down afterwards.

    Directions: Board and viewpoint are next to the village bridge (yellow dot in the picture).

    Destructions of the 2002 flood Once there were houses 2 houses repaired, all others gone
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    Garden Pavillon and Flood Exhibition

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    The little pavillon at the end of the baroque garden contains a small exhibition about the flood of 2002, its damages and how the gardens have been restored afterwards. Moving.

    It's hard to imagine now that the whole gardens were flooded. Hardening mud and debris threatened to suffocate the bushes and trees. Helpers from all over the country came to rescue the plants and clean up.

    Garden pavillon Recalling the flood: 1.5 m of debris Exhibition in the garden pavillon
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    Palace Gardens: The Column

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    Metal plates on the column mention the date of Nov 10, 1872 and the Agricultural District Association of the Ore Mountains as donators. The date provides the clue: The monument was a gift of the above mentioned association to King Johann and his wife on the occasion of their 50th wedding anniversary.

    The 2002 flood smashed the stone column to pieces. The globe and the metal parts were rescued. The stone parts had to be reconstructed.

    Column in the palace gardens Column in the palace gardens Column in the palace gardens
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    Palace Gardens: Flora Statue

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    Flora, the goddess of flowers, is watching over the palace gardens. The 19th century marble statue was toppled by the 2002 flood and buried in mud and debris. Luckily it didn't break and could be rescued. Newly restored, the statue has returned to her garden.

    Flora
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    The Palace Gardens

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    Below the palace a gardens in French baroque style extends at the bottom of the valley. An English landscape garden was added on the hillside in the 19th century.

    After the 2002 flood most of the trees, boxwood shrubs and rose bushes could be saved. New rows of linden trees were planted in the back part. Lawns and flower beds have been renewed. The garden is flourishing again.

    Palace garden Palace garden Palace garden Palace garden, back part with linden trees Palace garden: the nursery
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    Schloss: The Protestant Chapel

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    The protestant palace chapel was built in 1737-1741. It is said to have been planned by George Bähr, the architect of the Frauenkirche in Dresden, who already died in 1738. His successor as Dresden's municipal architect, Johann George Schmidt, was then in charge of the construction.

    The baroque interior is a fine example of Lutheran palace chapels. The high altar contains in the centre, instead of a painting, the pulpit - a typical Lutheran element. The windows left of the altar hide the 'box' for the Princes.

    The chapel is used for services regularly and especially popular for weddings. Since I visited on a Saturday I had no chance to get inside.

    Palace Chapel (with wedding)
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    Schloss: The Portal

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 1, 2008

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    The renaissance portal at the end of the bridge is obviously much older than the facades around it. It bears the date 1575 and the coats of arms of the founder, his wife and their ancestors. Biblical quotations in German indicate that the Bünaus had already joined the Lutheran reformation when the portal was built.
    This is not its original location, it was transferred here during the 18th century conversions to prove the ancient tradition of the palace as residence of the noble family of Bünau.

    Palace Portal, dated 1575
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