More Unique Places in Athens

  • bust of Melina Merkouri
    bust of Melina Merkouri
    by mindcrime
  • bust of Melina Merkouri
    bust of Melina Merkouri
    by mindcrime
  • tomb of Melina Merkouri
    tomb of Melina Merkouri
    by mindcrime

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Athens

  • nikkot's Profile Photo

    the turn of the century

    by nikkot Updated Feb 16, 2011

    When you visit the history of Athens museum you can admire some old photos of Athens city, how it was at the beginning of the 20th century. Marvelious!. Hotel Grande Bretagne at Syntagma squaire, aiolou street, the acropolis, omonia squaire!

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • penny_g's Profile Photo

    Thiseio flea market

    by penny_g Written Dec 9, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is definitely a must-do for the fans of oriental markets. You will see lots of gipsies, locals and other "exotic" people, offering a wide range of goods on this market. It is easily reachable by metro. The goods vary from souvenirs and ancient coins to lyngerie and wonderbras. Bear in mind that you can negotiate on the price and many articles start from 1 euro. Enjoy this flea market!

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    City Views Atop A MAssive Stone

    by AusPinay Updated Aug 9, 2010

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A massive stone right across the enormous Acropolis where most people go saved us the trouble of joining in the crowds there!

    We climbed up a steep flight of steps, though there is also another way up to the top of this massive stone which looked like made of granite. It was a bit slippery but it helped us see uninterrupted views of the city of Athens, even as far as the other temples of popular interest. Due to the intense heat, we were not inclined to go high up to the Acropolis and also we're scared to go back late to the ship as we're sailing around 3 pm and we didn't expect the bus trip to take longer!

    But finding and climbing this rock was a delight and gave us the stunning views that we didn't need to go there ourselves!Just look at the photos!We saw lots of ruins and temples from that vantage point alone!

    we went up here on a massive rock reached the top saw city views and more! another one we saw atop the rock!
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • angiebabe's Profile Photo

    Athens Airport

    by angiebabe Updated Sep 26, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I dont know if theres always an exhibition on there but keep an eye out as if theres an as interesting one as when I arrived then its worth taking a few minutes to have a look - when I arrrived there was a World Press Photo exhibition with excellent photos including moving pics of soldiers in Afghanistan - under an Airport Art banner.

    And then I went off to find the rental office and go get sorted with my rental car - great to just take your gear and go get in a car and be free again! Easy access to the motorways and I was on my way to Corinth and the Corinth Canal in no time.

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • profuselycool's Profile Photo

    Delos - Views and ruins just a half day-trip away!

    by profuselycool Updated Jun 7, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ok so while Athens has ridiculous amounts of historic sights and scenes, there is a very worthwhile half day-trip to take. Head down to the main docks where you'd catch a ferry to any of the islands, and there will be several different times a day in which a ferry will be offering fares to Delos, which is a small island visible off the coast of Athens. I think the ride took 30-45 minutes if memory serves correctly.

    Anyways, you (and about 100 other ppl on the ferry?) will be privvy to some of the most complete and preserved ruins in Greece! Delos was an old merchant island that went uninhabited, and there's tons of cool stuff to check out here. Foundations from housing plots are still erect, you can make out the squares and gardens that graced the wealthier homesteads, and there is a fantastic hike up a sizeable hill in the center of the island. This was certainly a hightlight- do the hike! It's way less than an hour from the docks to the top of the hill, and the view of the whole Aegean and distant Athens landscape is SO WORTH IT. If theres only a few things you do while in Athens, go to the parthenon, temple of poseidon, and DELOS!

    Sweeping views Ruins Cool sculptures
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    More ancient bits 2

    by leics Written Apr 24, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As in my other tip, the remains of ancient Athens are now being preserved as they are exposed by new building.

    In Platia Monastirakiou you can see ancient walls, drains and watercourses exposed underneath protective glass covers.

    Sadly, the guard rails around the covers are too high and too far away for small people like me to see clearly.

    But if you are bigger than I am do have a look as you wander through the square.

    Underneath the square.......... Platia Monastirikiou
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    More ancient bits 1

    by leics Written Apr 24, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ancient Athens (both Greek and Roman)extended far further than the Acropolis area, of course, but there is little sign of this under the acres of concrete.

    However, when ancient remains are exposed by new building they are now being preserved.

    You can see the remains of the Achanian Gate at the end of pedestrianised Eolou (which leads to Platia Omonia), and some bits of drainage systems, tombs, houses and roads are
    visible under protective glass and in Platia Kotzia (off Eolou).

    There is little enough to see of the ancient city once one is away from the Acropolis area: it is good to see newly-exposed remains being protected and kept visible.

    Achanian Gate and city wall Tombs and houses and wells More tombs and walls
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Roman baths

    by leics Updated Apr 20, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    You will almost certainly visit the site of the enormous Temple of Olympian Zeus.

    Whilst you are there take the time to wander the edges of the site. You'll find the remains of a 1st century Roman baths complex, and various other buildings, all quite well-signed in English.

    Although not huge, there are some nice bits of mosaic and some good examples of how the heating system worked.

    Worth a look before you go elsewhere.

    Entrance to site on Vasilissis Olgas. Open daily, April - September 8.30am - 7.30pm, October - March 8.30am - 3pm. 2 euro or joint Acropolis ticket.

    Mosaic flooring Heating furnace Exposed heating system Seats for the bath-house
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Fethiye Tzami

    by leics Written Apr 20, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ancient mosque of Fethiye Tzami dates from 1458 and stands in a corner of the Roman agora/forum site.

    The mosque was dedicated by Sultan Mehmet 11, who conquered Constantinople ('fethiye' means 'conquest')

    You can't go in, because it is used as an archaeological storage area, but you can look round the exterior.

    At the rear there are several tombstones, inscribed with Arabic memorials.

    Fethiye Tzami Ancient gravestones Mosque entrance Above the doorway
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Medresse

    by leics Written Apr 20, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Opposite the Roman agora/forum site, on the corner of Eolou and Pelopidha, stands the one of the few remnants of Ottoman Athens.

    The Medrese (madrassa or Islamic school) was no doubt linked with the ancient Fethiye Tzami mosque on the forum site (see other tip). The mosque dates from 1458, but the medresse was built in 1721, founded by Mehmet Fahkri.

    It was a big building, used later for a prison (and known for its poor conditions). It closed in the 1900s, and only its entrance gate and a small adjoining room now remain (not tilted..that was me!).

    A small glimpse of another side of Athens in the past........

    Medresse entrance
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Turkish Baths

    by leics Written Apr 19, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These are quite near the Roman Agora site, and worth a visit.

    The baths building dates from 1450, and it was in use right up to 1965! Oriinally men and women bathed at different times, but later on partitions were built and sections added to allow separate men's and women's baths.

    The baths have been beautifully and carefully restored, with some sections left exposed so you can see the inner workings.

    The glass lighting in the domes was deliberately designed to produce shafts of healing sunlight within each hot room.

    An audioguide tells you, in English, all about each room. It's a little bit too wordy, I think...I spent a good 10 minutes standing in the first room until I worked out how to fast-forward it.....but it is stuffed with interesting information. There is also a video presentation, but I didn't stay for that.

    It's well worth popping in to explore if you are nearby. The baths give a glimpse of an Athens neither ancient nor modern.

    Kiristou 8

    Open from 9 to 2.30pm Closed on Tuesdays. Entrance 2 euro.

    Tepidarium and caldarium Heating system exposed Shafts of sunlight........ Exposed wall heating pipe Model of the baths building
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Wander the Pnyx

    by leics Updated Apr 19, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Pnyx is a hill just below the Acropolis, and an easy walk from there.

    It is surrounded by parkland, with trees and wild flowers and places to sit and ponder whilst looking at the view.

    But the Pnyx is also an important archaeological site. It was here, in clear sight of the Acropolis, that the world's first democratic assemblies were held, fromas early as 507BC.

    Citizens of Athens (male) gathered on the Pnyx to debate issues, and to vote. They listened to speakers such as Pericles and Demosthenes....you can stand where they once stood.

    Two stoas have been excavated, where those enjoying debates could refresh themselves, and you can also see the remains of part of Athens'defensive wall, and a retaining wall built to support the are where asemblies were held. A sanctuary to Zeus Hephistos was erected there too...but perhaps the most evocative sight is that of the 'bema', the platform from which those famous speakers once addressed the assembly.

    Do wander the Pnyx if you can. I suspect not many visitors do. To me, it speaks more of ancient Athens than the wonders of the Acropolis itself....but it is worth a visit just for the views.

    Entrance is free, but the surrounding area (enclosing the Pnyx and the Hill of the Nymphs) is fenced, and there is no access after dusk.

    Acropolis viewed from the Pnyx. Bema....where the speaker stood Retaining wall Sanctuary wall carvings Sea view from the other side
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Ancient agora: grindstones.

    by leics Written Apr 12, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sites such as these are fullof things, far too many to display properly. That's why there are always piles of random stonesaround, too precious to just throw away but with no real possibility of use.

    Hidden away under the trees in the ancient agora site I found these grindstones neatly stacked and gradually being hidden by the Spring growth. They were used for grinding grain into flour: every bakehouse would have its own set (probably several sets).

    The sheer number of them (and I doubt these are all that have been discovere) underlines the busy-ness of this ancient marketplace. If you need that many grindstones you presumably expect to do very good daily business selling your flour and/or your bread!

    So many stones........
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Roman forum: stones

    by leics Written Apr 12, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Roman forum, containing the rather lovely Tower of the Winds, is a 'must-see'.

    But whilst you are exploring do take the time to look at the stones which are piled up everywhere, forming retaining walls or seats or just lying around in the grass.

    There are some really lovely examples of superb craftsmanship.

    Carved column Frieze Stones and column section Intricately carved decoration Useful as a bench
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • leics's Profile Photo

    On the Acropolis 2: the stones

    by leics Written Apr 11, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It's very obvious that a huge amount of work is going on here, with cranes and builders and machinery and piles of stones everywhere.

    It is worth looking at some of the stones in those piles. Although the main buildings are impressive, the 'abandoned'stones can be viewed close-up, and give a real idea of the massive skill involved in producing this site and others.

    Look for the hollows and bumps which enabled sections to fit together (as in the main photo). Look for the beautiful carving, and the sheer attention to detail which enabled this place to be created.

    Then remember that although Pericles and Fideas may have envisaged and masterminded the project, it was the ordinary working men of Athens whose superb skill actually allowed it to be built. The Parthenon only took 10 years to build......a fantastic feat......but the names of those men who created it are long, long forgotten.

    The bump which allowed it to fit: a perfect circle Inscribed column fragment Carved capitols Each stone cut and shaped by hand
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner

Athens Hotels

See all 372 Hotels in Athens

Latest Athens Hotel Reviews

Sofitel Athens Airport
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 5 Reviews
Athens Lycabettus Hotel
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 1 Review
Athenaeum Intercontinental
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 4 Reviews
Hotel Grande Bretagne, A Luxury Collection Hotel
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 13 Reviews
Hilton Athens
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 7 Reviews
President Hotel
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 10 Reviews
Athens International Youth Hostel
Great (4.0 out of 5.0) 6 Reviews
Omiros Hotel Athens
Very Good (3.5 out of 5.0) 2 Reviews
Airotel Parthenon
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 5 Reviews
The Westin Athens Astir Palace Beach Resort Athens
Excellent (4.5 out of 5.0) 3 Reviews

Instant Answers: Athens

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

13 travelers online now

Comments

Athens Off The Beaten Path

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Athens locals.
Map of Athens