map
Map &
Directions
access_time
Hours
mode_edit
Been here?
Rate it
chevron_left
 
chevron_right

Top Tours

 
Communist Budapest 3 Hour Small Group Excursion with a Historian
"The “Communist Budapest” tour takes you along some of the scenes of crucial events in these strange decades of oppression as well as progress; You’ll get a rich glimpse of daily life during this era. We start at Bem József Square where the first big demonstration of the 1956 uprising started. On the square is also a coffeehouse that has retained its original interior from the 1960’s. From there we go by subway to Kossuth square in front of Parliament to see several monuments that bear witness to the political and armed conflicts that took place during the 1956 revolution.It is just a minute walk to Freedom Square where the Cold War is symbolized by four edifices in stone: the US embassy a monument to the Soviet army the statue of President Ronald Reagan and the entrance to a secret atomic shelter. The subway takes you to one of the 1970’s housing estates at the edge of the city centre. These housing blocks may seem drab and grey today but at the time young Hungarian families were overjoyed to be awarded an apartment here because the newer building had elevators and modern conveniences unknown in Budapest’s older constructions. You’ll also get a feel of what a communist era shopping ce
From $65.00
 
Communist Budapest 3 Hour Private Excursion with a Historian
"The “Communist Budapest” tour takes you along some of the scenes of crucial events in these strange decades of oppression as well as progress; You’ll get a rich glimpse of daily life during this era. We start at Bem József Square where the first big demonstration of the 1956 uprising started. On the square is also a coffeehouse that has retained its original interior from the 1960’s. From there we go by subway to Kossuth square in front of Parliament to see several monuments that bear witness to the political and armed conflicts that took place during the 1956 revolution.It is just a minute walk to Freedom Square where the Cold War is symbolized by four edifices in stone: the US embassy a monument to the Soviet army the statue of President Ronald Reagan and the entrance to a secret atomic shelter. The subway takes you to one of the 1970’s housing estates at the edge of the city centre. These housing blocks may seem drab and grey today but at the time young Hungarian families were overjoyed to be awarded an apartment here because the newer building had elevators and modern conveniences unknown in Budapest’s older constructions. You’ll also get a feel of what a communist era shopping ce
From $295.00
 
Communist Budapest 3 Hour Private Excursion with a Historian
"The “Communist Budapest” tour takes you along some of the scenes of crucial events in these strange decades of oppression as well as progress; You’ll get a rich glimpse of daily life during this era. We start at Bem József Square where the first big demonstration of the 1956 uprising started. On the square is also a coffeehouse that has retained its original interior from the 1960’s. From there we go by subway to Kossuth square in front of Parliament to see several monuments that bear witness to the political and armed conflicts that took place during the 1956 revolution.It is just a minute walk to Freedom Square where the Cold War is symbolized by four edifices in stone: the US embassy a monument to the Soviet army the statue of President Ronald Reagan and the entrance to a secret atomic shelter. The subway takes you to one of the 1970’s housing estates at the edge of the city centre. These housing blocks may seem drab and grey today but at the time young Hungarian families were overjoyed to be awarded an apartment here because the newer building had elevators and modern conveniences unknown in Budapest’s older constructions. You’ll also get a feel of what a communist era shopping ce
From $295.00

Terror Haza - Terror Museum Tips (35)

Andrássy út 60

An iron curtain.

It sits outside Andrássy út 60. That building was the headquarters of the Arrow Cross Party (the Hungarian version of the Nazi Party) until Germany invaded in 1944.

It then became the state's jail, torture chamber and execution chamber.

When the USSR "liberated" the country in 1945, the ÀVH carried on where the Nazis left off. The ÀVH was the local version of the KGB.

The building became a museum to "The Terror" in 2002. “Terror Háza Múzeum” in Hungarian.

It is excellent, but harrowing. Two things stood out - the videos of victims who survived to tell their stories, and the cells, torture chambers & gallows in the basement.

A line of photos of victims which runs along the outside of the building. Many just disappeared, of course. Relatives can light candles for them and leave them on the ledge underneath.   

A piece of the Berlin Wall also sits in the street outside. No photography is allowed inside the museum.

Entry was 1,000 Ft for me, taking advantage of a reduction for EU citizens over 62 years of age. The normal adult price is 2,000 Ft.

It’s closed on Mondays.

iaint's Profile Photo
iaint
Nov 25, 2015

TERROR HOUSE MUSEUM

A feeling of sadness has descended upon me as I think about writing on this museum.
You see, I am thinking about what I saw and read about the people who were kept captive, beaten, starved, tortured and killed in this building, by members of two of Hungary's most frightening regimes - the Nazis in the early 1940's, and the Soviets, until 1956.

It was in December, 2000, when the old building was purchased, so it could be reconstructed and refurbished to become the Museum.
After paying our entrance fee and being told - NO PHOTOS ALLOWED. we began our tour. There is a set way to go around the Museum.
The Museum is very well set out and done in a way to make people "feel" what it was like to be held in this building.

The House of Terror Museum commemorates the victims of both the Communist and the Nazi regimes in Hungary. The building was the former headquarter of the ultra-right (Nazi) party in 1940, and its basement was used as a prison. I was able to go and see the small cells the prisoners were kept in. During Communism, the building was taken over by the State Security (Hungarian version of the KGB). Hundreds, or perhaps even thousands, were tortured in the House of Terror.
The prisoners weren't actually executed here, they died here through the horrific conditions at the Terror House.
There are four floors to the Museum. The basement contains cells where torture took place - including a room in which oxygen was shut off to the occupant and a room where the occupant was made to sit or stand in water.

You need to go to feel the experience that is stated as.......
" a multi-sensory experience that takes visitors beyond the visual and seeks to emphasize the importance of remembering this time in Hungary's history."

Outside the Museum on the exterior wall, are photo's of many of the young victims. So sad to see the young ages.

OPEN
TUESDAY - SUNDAY: 10:00 am-6:00 pm
CLOSED MONDAYS

ADMISSION
No admission fee required for visiting our bookstore.
ADULTS 2000 HUF
CONCESSION 1000 HUF
Free admission for:
Disabled visitors and their carers.
Visitors over the age of 70 (for Citizens of EEA)

Temporary exhibition ticket price 1000 HUF
Temporary exhibition ticket price with permanent ticket: 500 HUF

balhannah's Profile Photo
balhannah
Apr 30, 2014

A must!!

This museum was recommended to my by one of my Hungarian co-workers. Housed in the former headquarters building of the secret police it is a poignant memorial to those who fell to the inherent evils of National Socialism and oppressive communism. On the exterior of the building are affixed photos of those who were tortured and killed within the walls. Walk through the basement "interrogation cells", and see the memorial to the martyrs of the 56 uprising.

You will leave with an appreciation of the 20th century struggles of the Hungarian people. Needless to say, it was a very humbling place to visit.

JeffreyC10's Profile Photo
JeffreyC10
Oct 20, 2013

house of terror

i wasn't planning to visit this museum but thank God some local people told me to do so.It's one of the most scary-and at the same time- touching museums i have ever been at.It presents the two bloody periods of Hungarian history(nazism and communism) and it's a memorial to the victims of those.When i left the building i saw people coming out and crying...

prices:
2000 HUF full price ticket
1000 HUF half price ticket (for citizens of EEA - European Economic Area - between 6-26 and 62-70 years)
(with international student card between 6-26)

evadeen's Profile Photo
evadeen
May 28, 2013
 
 
Sponsored Listings

Hotels Near Terror Haza - Terror Museum

Hotels
15. Aradi utca, Budapest, 1062, Hungary
Show Prices
Hotels
30 Aradi utca, Budapest, 1062, Hungary
Show Prices
Hotels
Eotvos utca 25/a, Budapest, 1067, Hungary
Show Prices
Hotels
Izabella Utca 61, Budapest, 1064, Hungary
Show Prices
Hotels
Terez korut 22, 1066, 6th district, Budapest, 1066, Hungary
Show Prices
Hotels
Budapest VI Terez krt. 30 III/28, Ring Code 48, Budapest, 1066, Hungary
Show Prices

The best museum in Budapest

In my opinion, this was the most interesting museum in Budapest. It is housed in the building that served as headquarters to the Nazi party and then to the Communist party while the country was under Soviet rule. As you make your way through the museum, a collection of artefacts, documentaries and info sheets give you information about this determining era in the history of the country, which ones tend to forget given how much Budapest has changed and recovered from its battle wounds. It also serves as a memorial to the victims of these two totalitarian regimes. The visit includes a tour of the basement's cells where people were detained, interrogated and executed by the KGB.

Admision costs 2000 forints and the museum is closed on Mondays.

Jefie's Profile Photo
Jefie
Nov 11, 2012

House of Terror

The House of Terror is a very interesting and eye-opening museum about one of the dark chapters of Hungary's past. This museum showcases what life was like under communism and fascism and commemorates the victims. It details the activities of the old secret police and takes you downstairs to view their various torture and interrogation rooms. Pictures of the victims line the walls. The "propaganda room" is also very interesting to walk through. There is so much information here as well as exhibits and original "artifacts" from this time. If you come to Budapest, you have to visit this museum to see what life was like in Hungary for a large part of the 20th century.

hungariangirl896's Profile Photo
hungariangirl896
Aug 23, 2012

House of Terror

This building on Andrassy Avenue at number 60 was the headquarters of the secret police first under the Fascist Arrow Cross regime (who called it the "House of Loyalty") and then the communist regime. The building now operates as a museum telling the story of the repression of the Hungarian people under these two regimes (with a heavy emphasis on the communist regime).

The route around the building starts on the 2nd floor and works down to the basmement where you see the cells that many of the regimes' victims were incarcerated in. The displays are on the whole evocative and emotive (with atmospheric, foreboding background music) rather than informative. The information is conveyed instead through printed A4 information sheets which you pick up as you enter each room (in Hungarian or English). Each room does provide a great deal of information in this way and you can take these info sheets away with you. Many of the rooms also have screens showing interviews with people who are telling their stories about the actions of these regimes (victims and staff).

zadunajska8's Profile Photo
zadunajska8
Nov 28, 2011

Chilling, Exciting,Eye-opening: A Must in Budapest

I must confess: When I planned my visit to Budapest the House of Terror was not high on my list: Given its name and the fact that in popular travel websites it was rated first in popularity among all the Budapest sights, I expected some kitschy tourist attraction that commercialized Hungary's grim history in the 20th century and sold this story to attraction-hungry tourists from overseas. Well, I was mistaken, I was wrong.

This is a serious, comprehensive display of the troubles in Hungary from the 1940s to 1991: The Second World War, the Arrow-Cross regime, the rounding-up of Hungary's Jews and their dispatch to liquidation, the short "spring" after Hitler's defeat, then the Communist takeover, the early suppression of liberal, democratic voices, the 1956 uprising and its cruel suppression, the totalitarian regime up to the Soviets' departure in 1991.

Although serious and comprehensive, the display is extremely well put together, the stories are thrilling, the atmosphere created in every room different according to the topic but very realistic. This creates for the visitor a personal journey through recent history, experiencing what the Hungarian nation has been through.

The setting is the grim building of the secret police, with its authentic prison cells. And where, of all places? On the elegant Andrassy Street, in central Budapest.
Yes, it is claustrophobic; a Russian tank occupying the center of the small inner courtyard on the ground floor; an elevator which takes you (one way!) down to the prison cells in the basement. You can't go back up in the elevator; you have to make your way through the small labyrinth of the prison to find the way up again, and then the atmosphere changes abruptly: It is happy and solemn, the Russian tanks are leaving, this time for good.

One of the powerful halls of the museum is deisgned as a courtroom. You actually sit on a wooden bench and watch a black & white documentary of the trial of Imre Nagy, the Hungarian leader who wanted more freedom for his people.

A humorous interlude is the room dedicated to Communist consumer propaganda: Bright lights, colorful posters, some of them saying that American-bred insects are destroying the Hungarian crops (see photo)...

Whatever you do in Budapest, the House of Terror is a must!

iblatt's Profile Photo
iblatt
Nov 01, 2011

Top 5 Budapest Writers

MedioLatino's Profile Photo

MedioLatino

"Budapest - My dear hometown! :)"
View Member
1courage's Profile Photo

1courage

"Budapest, the "Phoenix bird", my lovely home city"
View Member
balhannah's Profile Photo

balhannah

"BIG, BUSTLING, BEAUTIFUL, BUDAPEST!"
View Member
Cristian_Uluru's Profile Photo

Cristian_Uluru

"A fantastic town along the Danube River"
View Member
antistar's Profile Photo

antistar

"Budapest"
View Member
 
 

Central Pest: House of Terror

Looking more like a nightclub than a monument to the thousands who suffered at the hands of the autocratic regimes that ran Hungary into the ground in the latter half of the 20th century, the House of Terror remains a very popular tourist destination. It's a museum that charts the horrors of the fascist Arrow Cross Party, and the longer period of pain under the Communists.

It's a fascinating period of Hungary's history, but the museum has drawn some criticism for its political nature, not least because its first exhibition is a video that details the loss of Hungarian territory under the Treaty of Trianon, a popular theme with Hungary's far right.

antistar's Profile Photo
antistar
Oct 23, 2011

Sort of Terrifying, I Guess

The Summer of 2010 will probably go down in my personal history as The Summer of Communist Memorials. Having recently visited the Memorial to Victims of Communism and the Resistance in Sighetu Marmatiei, I was interested in seeing Budapest's take on the same theme. I thought, surely a world-renowned, wealthy metropolis like Budapest will have a museum that really makes an impact. Sadly, House of Terror simply did not compare to the museum I'd visited only weeks earlier in Romania. House of Terror (Terror Haza) is one of Budapest's most popular "tourist attractions". Located on the upscale Andrassy utca in the former headquarters of the secret police, this museum is something of a labyrinth, with rooms dedicated to the atrocities committed by the fascist and Stalinist regimes, as well as the events preceding the 1956 Uprising (against Soviet policies in Hungary). While I found many of the rooms to make a strong visual impact, I didn't feel that the experience was cohesive for non-Hungarian speakers. As a young North American anglophone I had minimal background knowledge, and the information cards at the entrance to each room left much to be desired. If you have a passionate interest in fascism or Stalinist policies, or an interest in gallery design, you might want to visit House of Terror. Otherwise, I'd be hard-pressed to recommend it. Note that the museum is closed on Mondays and regular admission is about 1800 HUF. Access from Oktogon metro station.

Jetgirly
Apr 01, 2011

House of Terror

House of Terror is a museum located at Andrássy út 60 in Budapest, Hungary. It contains exhibits related to the fascist and communist dictatorial regimes in 20th century Hungary and is also a memorial to the victims of these regimes, including those detained, interrogated, tortured or killed in the building.

The museum opened on February 24, 2002 and the Director-General of the museum since then has been Dr. Mária Schmidt.

mallyak's Profile Photo
mallyak
Dec 13, 2010

Terror Museum

This museum is one of the best I have seen in Eastern Europe. It has interactive displays, state of the art equipment and English description. It is 3 floors of rooms, taking you from the Nazi occupation, to liberation by the Soviets and then to the Soviet occupation. There is a mock prison in the basement and the weirdest fountain I have ever seen in my life in the lobby- an oil fountain. The tank in the lobby has an incredibly slow dripping oil fountain. The normal price is 1500 HUF for adults, 750 HUF for students, but on Sundays its free, all you have to do is show your ISIC or other card like it. I would give yourself 45-90 minutes to go through it, depending on what kind of a museum person you are.

jlfloyd's Profile Photo
jlfloyd
Jun 24, 2008

Things to Do Near Terror Haza - Terror Museum

Things to Do

Stamp Museum - Belyemuzeum

When ever we travel, we make it a point to always seek out the local post office. Most all places we have visited, we have come home with colorful stamps from the country we visited .... Great To...
View More
Things to Do

Ernst Museum

We found this museum by our Budapest Card Catalogue. It was our last day in Budapest, Sunday, it's drizzling. But we decided to visit some museums. And Ernst Museum was one of them. We saw so...
View More
Things to Do

Westend City Centre Mall

Westend is a huge shopping center on the Pest side of town next to Nyugati Railway Station. Westend's more than 350 stores include some designer clothing shops, shoe stores, jewelry shops, a...
View More
Things to Do

Post Museum - Postamúzeum

The other amazing building of the Andrássy avenue is the Postmuseum projected by Győző Czigler and built between 1882 and 1886. Like ost of the buildings of the Avenue also this one was...
View More
Things to Do

Agriculture Museum

The Museum of Hungarian Agriculture is the biggest museum of agriculture found in Europe. It is situated in one of the lovely buildings of Castle Vajdahunyad on the Széchenyi-island in Városliget....
View More
Things to Do

Comedy Theatre - Vigszinhaz

The neo-baroque building of the Commedy Theatre is the most beautiful sight on the Szent István körút(Saint Stephen`s Ring), the first part of the Nagykörút (Big Ring). The contruction of this theatre...
View More

Getting to Terror Haza - Terror Museum

Address

1062 Budapest, Andrassy ut 60.

Hours

  • Sunday 10:00 to 18:00
  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday 10:00 to 18:00
  • Wednesday 10:00 to 18:00
  • Thursday 10:00 to 18:00
  • Friday 10:00 to 18:00
  • Saturday 10:00 to 18:00

Map