Famine Memorial, Dublin

15 Reviews

Custom House Quay Dublin 1 +00 353 (0)1 605 7700
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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    REMEMBER THE POOR AND HUNGRY

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

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    By Custom House Quay there is a rather interesting stone on the ground that commemorates the United Nations . The limestone memorial signifies the solidarity with poor people living around the world. Joseph Wresinski organised 100,000 people to gather in Paris to honour the victims of hunger and poverty and call on the world to respect human rights. this took place on October 17th 1987 and since then the UN has declared 17th October the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Now there are 30 replicas of the original stone that are scattered around the world.

    Address: Custom House Quay Dublin 1

    Phone: +00 353 (0)1 605 7700

    Website: http://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/famine-memorial/31500

    WORLD POVERTY STONE
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    THREE POUNDS TO CROSS THE ATLANTIC

    by davidjo Written Jul 26, 2015

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    Dublin sculptor Rowan Gillespie designed this sad reminder of the Irish people that were forced to emigrate to America due to the 19th century famine. The memorial was unveiled in 1997 at Customs House Quay which was fitting as one of the first ships, Perserverance departed from there on St. Patrick's day 1846. the 74 year old Captain William Scott, a native of Shetland but now working in New Brunswick gave up his job to make the Atlantic crossing and help these unfortunate people. He was a veteran of the Atlantic and reached New York on 28th May 1846 without losing a crew member or any of the passengers who had paid 3 pounds each to make the journey.

    Address: Custom House Quay Dublin 1

    Phone: +00 353 (0)1 605 7700

    Website: http://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/famine-memorial/31500

    THE FAMINE SCULPTURE PLAQUE ONE POOR SOUL
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  • windoweb's Profile Photo

    Famine Memorial

    by windoweb Updated Jun 13, 2015

    During the famine approximately 1 million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland, causing the island's population to fall by between 20% and 25%.

    No event in history has had a more profound effect on Ireland and the worldwide Irish Community than that of the Great Irish Famine (1845-1849).

    The cause of Famine is blamed on a potato disease commonly known as potato blight. The blight ravaged potato crops throughout Europe during the 1840s. The impact and human cost in Ireland was one third of the population who was entirely dependent on the potato for food. It was exacerbated by a host of political, social and economic factors which remain the subject of historical debate.

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    Famine

    by gordonilla Updated May 27, 2015

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    We came across this as we were walking around the city centre. If you travel from the ferry terminal you pass this on your way into the city.

    There were a great many plaques set into the ground showing the names of Irish men and woman and those from around the world with Irish links.

    Address: Custom House Quay Dublin 1

    Directions: near to the Talbot Memorial Bridge and the Sean O'Casey Bridge

    Phone: +00 353 (0)1 605 7700

    Website: http://www.discoverireland.ie/Arts-Culture-Heritage/famine-memorial/31500

    Plaque

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Public Art: Somber memorial

    by yooperprof Written Jul 12, 2013

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    Life-size bronzes, beautifully sculpted by the brilliant Rowan Gillespie (b. 1953). The sculpture group is on the quayside, in front of the Custom House.

    Gillespie is Dublin born and has his studio here. I think it's interesting that he was greatly influenced by the work of Norwegian painter Edvard Munch.

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    A very moving monument / sculpture

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is a recent addition to the sculptures of Dublin. I think anyone who stops to think will find it a very evocative and moving piece of artwork.

    It's a memorial to both those who left these shores and those who did'nt. It was from here that thousands of emogrants boarded steamers to Liverpool before tranferring to cross-Atlantic ships. They may have gone on to prosperity and a new life, but pity those who were left behind in poverty.

    FROM the Irish Faminie fund website. :

    Building a future - by remembering the past

    In the mid-184O's, Ireland was in the grip of the Great Famine that would devastate the land and the people for many years. During this time, one and a half million men, women and children died, and a further one and a half million emigrated.

    It is now one hundred and fifty years since the Famine. Those that were forced to leave our shores built new lives for themselves, and helped to shape a brave future for their adopted homelands. As a result, over seventy million people around the world now proudly claim their Irish heritage.

    Address: Quayside North

    Directions: Follow the north bank of The Liffey out towards the sea - past the customs house.

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  • lbhspatriot's Profile Photo

    In honour of Irish history...

    by lbhspatriot Written Apr 14, 2010

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    One of the most moving Irish Famine Monuments is located on Custom House Quay. It is special for me, it depicts sculptures of starving people - very thin, walking towards the ships on the docks.
    It was built in memory of those who left for another country (mostly the USA) in hope of a better life. Ireland was struck with a great famine between 1845-49 when it was hit with potato blight, that destroyed most potatoes in the country. One milion people died of starvation or disease caused from lack of food.

    I think it is worth going there and pay a tribute, once in Dublin. A beautiful landmark, really.

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Memorial to the Victims of the Famine

    by MalenaN Written Mar 10, 2007

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    On Custom House Quay is one of the Famine Monuments in Dublin. The people depicted in the sculptures are very thin of starvation and it is like they are walking towards the ships along the quay that could take them to another country and hopefully a better life.

    Between 1845 - 49 Ireland was hit by the potato blight, which destroyed almost all potatoes growing. And as potatoes were the primary food source it was a disaster and about one million people died of starvation or diseases. Even more people emigrated to Great Britain, Australia or America.

    Address: Custom House Quay

    Struggling A man and a dog
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  • hevbell's Profile Photo

    FAMINE MEMORIAL

    by hevbell Written Dec 23, 2006

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    Alongside the River Liffey, just passed Customs House, is the Famine memorial dedicated to all those who lost their lives in the infamous Irish potato famine. At night it is lit up and the rake thin statues look quite eerie but definitely bring it home to you how people must have suffered during that time.

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • IrishFem's Profile Photo

    Irish Famine Memorial

    by IrishFem Updated May 19, 2006

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    During the time of the Great Irish Famine, 1845 to 1849 more than one million men women and children died and nearly two million were forced to emigrate. The famine resulted in the potato crop failure the main source of food for Irish people. A memorial of six life sized bronze figures is situated near the customs house quay as a reminder of the hardship endured at that time. This area has had a complete makeover. Once a dangeous place to venture, now its full of restaurants, bars and a place where all the banking institutes have their offices. Do look out for magazine listings for the Summer months. The plaza turns into a makeshift theatre hosting plays and all sorts of music.

    Directions: From Trinity College head north of the river, cross over O'Connell Bridge and turn right. Custom House Quay its the next quay after Eden Quay.

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  • axekick's Profile Photo

    Haunting Statues

    by axekick Updated Mar 26, 2006

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    These statues of Ireland's greatest economic disaster are in front of custom house quay (a symbol of Ireland’s economic success), I'm not sure what this says.

    The statues themselves are very good however the plaques on the floor are a little off putting. They list the names of people who donated money to help build the memorial, which is all well and good. However the names of famous people are in bold and highlighted. Personally I think a memorial should be just that, not a means to promote your celebrity status.

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • ChrsStrl's Profile Photo

    The 'Famine' Sculpture

    by ChrsStrl Written Jul 30, 2004

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    Just down from Custom House is the rather moving sculpture of a number of figures made to represent the poor who left Ireland during that time to find hope elsewhere.

    It was sculpted by Rowan Gillespie and commemorates the 1845 famine. The figures are tall and elongated - the strecth making them thinner. There is a rather nicely done dog amidst them.

    Address: Custom House Quay, north side of the Liffey

    What can one say?
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  • elsebeth's Profile Photo

    So-called art

    by elsebeth Updated May 17, 2009

    This is the very famous Famine memorial, which is apparently art. It's some bronze statues with the saddest look on their face I've ever seen. Well they were starving so no wonder really..

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • frankcanfly's Profile Photo

    Famine Memorial

    by frankcanfly Written Jul 7, 2006

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    There are actually two famine memorials that I found while wandering about. One is just down the river from The customs house, and another is in St. Stephens Green.

    Address: Custom House Quay

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  • elcolibri's Profile Photo

    The Famine Memorial

    by elcolibri Written May 29, 2005

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    The famine memorial in Dublin is a complex sculpturic monument remembrances the potato famine in 1846-47, designed by Rowan Gillespie in 1998. The complex is seat on Custom House Quay.

    Address: Custom House Quay

    Famine Memorial

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