Merrion Square, Dublin

4.5 out of 5 stars 41 Reviews

  • Merrion Square
    by yooperprof
  • Merrion Square
    by yooperprof
  • Memorial to Oscar Wilde
    Memorial to Oscar Wilde
    by yvgr

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    LET US NOT FORGET THEIR SACRIFICES

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The National Memorial to Members of the Defence Forces Who Have Died in Service (2008) is situated in the east side of Merrion square Park and it is rather an attractive memorial, being a glass and granite pyramid, inside of which there is a member of the Army, Navy, Air Corps and Reserve standing over an eternal flame. It is quite difficult to take a decent photograph through the glass and capture the scene. Dubliner Brian King designed and created the monument which was installed in 2008.

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    An D��n Cuimhneach��in (Irish name for the memorial) view from glass panel
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    THE VICTIMS

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the more interesting sculptures in Merrion Square Park was a piece of work named THE VICTIMS by artist Andrew O'Connor. The Victims was installed in the park in 1976 but were actually given to the Dublin Municipal Gallery in 1938 and 1947 by members of O'Connor's family. They were originally intended for a huge war memorial in Washington DC but no such monument was ever commissioned to him. The sculpture is of a dead soldier strapped to a bier with his wife and mother by his side, inscribed with the words NAKED YOU COME INTO THIS WORLD, His wife is kneeling with her hands clasped in prayer and is often called THE MOTHER OF SORROWS. She is inscribed with the words ‘As cranes chanting their dolorous notes traverse the sky’ which is taken from a version of Dante's Inferno.

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    one of the best in the park
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    HE WROTE UNDER THE PSEUDONYM AE

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    George Russell (1867-1935) is remembered by a bust in Merrion Park. He was an Irish Nationalist but also a poet, writer, critic and painter. He was also a mystical writer, and centre of a group of followers of theosophy in Dublin, for many years. George wrote using the pseudonym AE and his bust was the work of sculptor Jerome Connor, an Irish American.

    Address: MERRION SQUARE PARK

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    GEORGE RUSSELL
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    THE REVOLUTIONARY LEADER

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Michael Collins (1890-1922) was an Irish revolutionary leader who fought and died during the Irish War of Independence. In 1921 he was part of the group that negotiated the Anglo/Irish agreement and as well as being head of the provincial government he was commander-in-chief of the government forces during the civil war. Th sculptor was Dick Joynt who traveled through the Americas before returning to Dublin where he set up Craan Studios

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    MICHAEL COLLINS
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    REMEMBER MANDELA

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walking around Merrion Park you will come across a few sculpture of heads and there is one by the famous British artists, Elizabeth Frink whose work TRIBUTE HEAD II was unveiled on 26th June 1983 which was the 20th year of Nelson Mandela's imprisonment in S Africa. Elizabeth is a member of Art for Amnesty project and she had these words to say
    ‘a tribute to all people who have died or suffered for their beliefs. These men are heroes in the sense that they
    are survivors, but they are also victims stripped of everything but their human courage.’

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    TRIBUTE HEAD II
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    A LOVELY PARK WITH OSCAR WILDE BY THE ENTRANCE

    by davidjo Written Jul 27, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The townhouses at Merrion Square were built at the end of the 17th century but the earliest plan of the park shows a double line of trees around the perimeter which was eventually surrounded by railings early in the 19th century. The park was only accessible to residents of the square until the city council took it over in 1960. As you enter you will see Oscar Wilde perched on a rock but as you wander around on the paths you will see many trees, gardens and many statues that are partially hidden in the garden.It is well worth spending an hour here on a summer's day.

    NOTE
    Strict rules are enforced regarding ball games, dogs, bicycles and alcohol

    Address: Merrion Square

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Georgian: Merrion Square Townhouses (II)

    by yooperprof Written Aug 3, 2013

    Notice how this house is five windows wide! It would have been very prestigious indeed. There was a clear social hierarchy based upon how many "bays" your house possessed. Pity those whose Georgian townhouse was only two windows wide.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Georgian - Merrion Square townhouses (I)

    by yooperprof Written Aug 3, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dublin is notable for its extensive and very well-preserved Georgian neighborhoods. The Georgian townhouse created both a urban way of life, and an influential vocabulary of architectural features. In this view, notice how the relative modesty of the exterior facades conceals the relative extravagance of the luxury that is found within. See how the windows on each floor are of a different height, revealing the function and prestige of the activities found within. The ground floor windows are tall, but the highest windows are found one floor up, which is where the "reception rooms" would be located.

    Directions: Merrion Square

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • yvgr's Profile Photo

    Oscar Wilde's Birthplace

    by yvgr Updated Apr 22, 2012

    The birthplace of Oscar Wilde still exists and the building looking the very same as back in Wilde's times. It is located in the Merrion square almost on the opposite side of the Oscar Wilde monument. Today it is the place of Irish American University and outside the there's a memorial sign to Wilde's father who was a famous surgeon.

    Merrion Square (Irish: Cearnóg Mhuirfean) is a Georgian square on the southside of Dublin city centre. It was laid out after 1762 and was largely complete by the beginning of the 19th century. It is considered one of the city's finest surviving squares. Three sides are lined with Georgian redbrick townhouses; the West side abuts the grounds of Leinster House (seat of the Oireachtas), Government Buildings, the Natural History Museum and the National Gallery. The central railed-off garden is now a public park.

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    Oscar Wilde was born here Memorial to Oscar Wilde
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • Durfun's Profile Photo

    Green oasis in the City

    by Durfun Written Dec 29, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This stretch of a park is more like a thick forest.

    Inside the north west corner gateway, there is a statue of Oscar Wilde composed of different coloured stone, sitting on a large granite boulder.

    It is visible from outside the perimeter railings. Once inside, you will see a funky factfile pillar about 15 feet in front of Oscar.

    In 1855, the family moved to 1 Merrion Square, and hence this is a well-appointed tribute to the great Irish playwright, poet and author.

    Address: Merrion Square, Dublin

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.
    Not far from the National Gallery.

    Viewed from the front (in the park) Front view (outside the park, via the railings) Viewed from the left (in the park) Street the statue faces (that Oscar sees daily!)
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Merrion Square

    by Dabs Written Jul 27, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I had learned during my 1st 6 days in Ireland that you take advantage of good weather when you have it so after checking into my hotel just north of Merrion Square, I headed into the Archbishop Ryan Park that sits in the middle of the square to have a look around. As I wandered through the park, I found the bust of politician Michael Collins but it's the statue of Oscar Wilde, affectionately known as the "fag on the crag", that is the star here. He reclines on a rock in the northwest corner of the park, just across the street from his childhood home at No. 1 which now houses the American College Dublin. On pillars across from him are a naked male torso and his pregnant wife Constance, the pillars etched with some of his witticisms.

    The houses that line the square are fine examples of the Georgian style of architecture and had many famous residents, besides Oscar Wilde, Irish national leader Daniel O'Connell lived at No. 58 and WB Yeats lived at Nos. 52 and 82, you can see blue plaques on the facades that identify their famous previous owners.

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    The fag on the crag-Oscar Wilde Tribute to Oscar Wilde Tribute to Oscar Wilde Archbishop Ryan Park Bust of Michael Collins

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    Childhood home of Oscar Wilde

    by Jefie Updated May 23, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Merrion Square is one of Dublin's largest and finest Georgian squares. Its plans were laid out by John Ensor near the end of the 18th century, and it is surrounded by some of the city's most important buildings, including the National Gallery, the National Museum and Leinster House, the seat of the Irish Parliament. A number of illustrious citizens have also lived in the beautiful townhouses that surround the square, including W.B. Yeats (No. 82) and Oscar Wilde (No. 1). The square's central park is very nicely designed. A number of statues and monuments are dispersed throughout the park, including that of Oscar Wilde, affectionately known to most Dubliners as "The fag on the crag"(!). There is also a nice collection of old streetlights spread throughout the park.

    Address: Merrion Square

    Directions: Downtown Dublin

    Oscar Wilde statue at Merrion Square Merrion Square in Dublin One of the old streetlights Government Buildings, just off Merrion Square Oscar Wilde's childhood home (from 1855 to 1876)

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Merrion Square

    by call_me_rhia Written Aug 27, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Merrion Square, the best Georgian square in Dublin... sublime architecture and the famous colourful irish doors. Georgian architecture was fairly rigid and unform, so people used colourful doors to differentiate... and artistic door knockers.

    In georgian times the rich and famous lived here, and if you take your time and walk around it, you'll see may plaques indicating who lived there. For example: Oscar Wilde lived at No 1, Daniel O'Connell at No 58, Sheridan Le Fanu at No 70 and W. B. Yeats at No 82.

    There is also charming park in the middle, with colourful flowers and shrub beds. In the past this park was private: only residents of the square had the keys and could enter it. it is now public, and it's one of the nicest parks in town.

    Address: merrion Square

    Directions: Dublin 2, a few minutes walk from Stephen's Green

    colourful door colourful door merrion square, park Wb yeats plaque colourful doors

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Oscar Wilde Statue

    by MalenaN Written Mar 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900) is one of the most famous Irish writers, a play writer, novelist, poet and short story writer. As a child he lived in a house at Merrion Square and just across from that building, in the park, there is a colourful statue of him. He is half sitting /lying on a big granite boulder. Wilde himself is made up of stones in different colours.

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner
  • LittleDee's Profile Photo

    Oscar Wilde's Resting Place

    by LittleDee Written Sep 13, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Merrion Square with its well kept central park dates back to 1762 and has the National Gallery on its west side, while the other three sides are lined with elegant Georgian buildings. Around this square are the hallmarks of the best Georgian Dublin entrances - elegant doors and peacock fanlights, ornate door knockers and more than a few foot-scrapers where gentlemen removed mud from their shoes before venturing inside.

    Merrion residents include Oscar Wilde who can now be found lounging on a rock watching the world go by within Merrion Square park.

    Directions: In the southeast of the city centre, about 10 minutes walking east from the front of Trinity College.

    Was this review helpful?

    Add to your Trip Planner

Instant Answers: Dublin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

108 travelers online now

Comments