Day Trip to Pompeii, Naples

26 Reviews

  • Day Trip to Pompeii
    by apbeaches
  • Day Trip to Pompeii
    by apbeaches
  • Day Trip to Pompeii
    by apbeaches

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    There Are Many Tenements Near the Capuan Gate

    by hquittner Written Nov 30, 2013

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    There are clusters of rectangular narrow streets around the Capuan Gate filled with tenements with laundry hanging across the narrow streets and at the ground level markets and open stalls in every open space not covered by parked cars and the noise of a busy world.

    Tenement Street Fish Stall Small Fancy Suit and Dress
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    • Seniors

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    Pompei - The place most Naples tips are about

    by sargentjeff Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Okay, so Jeff finally made it to Pompei. I've been meaning to visit for quite some time, but finally did in Nov 2002. I was quite impressed, and all the reading I did prior to the trip really made it more interesting. Bottomline - The people of Pompei were brilliant, and made some extraordinary contributions during their day.

    It's better to go during summer months when the ruins are open until 7:30 p.m., as they close at 5:00 during winter months.

    Address: Pompei - Um what more can I say

    Directions: Take the Tangenziale from Naples, or the circumvesuviana train. Driving, go towards "Costiera Amalfitana". Pompei is past Ercolano, and the ruins are just off the highway after the toll.

    Pompei Porto Marina Gate
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    Pompeii

    by guell Updated Feb 24, 2010

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    Now that you’ve seen the museum collection, head to Pompeii. Pompeii is one of the world's best-preserved towns of Ancient Rome.

    Pompeii can be visited on a day-trip form Naples, Sorrento and even Rome. It can also be visited in transit (from Sorrento or the Amalfi Coast to Naples or Rome for example.)

    From Napels, take the inter-city train heading to Sorrento. About half way to Sorrento, you’ll reach Pompeii..

    Website: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/3ed33/23921/

    Temple of Apolo-Pompeii
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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Pompei

    by apbeaches Written Jul 16, 2008

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    Pompeii is a ruined and partially buried Roman city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. It, along with Herculaneum (its sister city), was destroyed, and completely buried, during a catastrophic eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius spanning two days on 24 August 79 AD.

    The volcano collapsed higher roof-lines and buried Pompeii under many meters of ash and pumice, and it was lost for nearly 1700 years before its accidental rediscovery in 1748. Since then, its excavation has provided an extraordinarily detailed insight into the life of a city at the height of the Roman Empire.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • FinElina's Profile Photo

    Pompei

    by FinElina Written Nov 25, 2006

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    The ruins of Pompei are very near the city of Naples, just take the Circumvesuviana train to Scavi di Pompei.
    The area is huge so you might want to hire a guide (possibility to do this on site) or at least take a map of the area with you.

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  • Vineyards of Pompeii

    by Foriano Updated Dec 29, 2005

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    In the Orchard of the Fugitives today, with its green grass, robust grape vines, and fruit trees, it is life, not death, that prevails, and the orchard is lovely once again. Ever more patches of green have come to life over the past decade as environmental biologists try to identify and recreate Pompeii's urban gardens. Down the street another vineyard adjoins the Osteria of the Gladiators, where four species of indigenous white grapes have been planted in soil that nurtured similar vines two thousand years ago. After a hot summer, the grapes are so full of sweet juice that the vines have to be covered with fine nets to protect the harvest from thieving birds. For harvest it they will. This vineyard is not just for show but is part of an ambitious effort to resurrect the vineyards of Pompeii and recreate the wines of the ancient Romans according to old Roman methods. The project- is a public-private partnership between the Archaeological Superintendence of Pompeii and the Campania wine estate Mastroberardino. Ancient frescos, root imprints, Roman authors, and DNA are used to identify the grape varieties.

    Directions: The slopes of Vesuvius provide a perfect landform for a vineyard.

    Website: http://www.dolcetours.com/re_article9.htm

    Zingaro at Sundown
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    • Food and Dining
    • Wine Tasting

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  • spicysurfer's Profile Photo

    Pompeii by night

    by spicysurfer Updated Aug 31, 2005

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    At the firts glance it seems to be dark and dangerous. But by the way of the visit, it begin to became astonishing. Under the lights the town seem to born again. You can really see the people living here and working and go back to their houses. I wanted to stay there all the night, but it was impossible. Every tourist (and neapolitan) must live this experience.

    Address: Pompeii archaeological excavations

    Directions: By car: motorway to Salerno. Exit Pompei

    Pompeii by night
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    Pompei

    by Beograd Updated Dec 15, 2004

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    This is a model of Pompei. When I saw this model, it was understood how come we were so tired after walking around Pompei and yet have seen only a small frycture of it! That's right! It's HUGE!!!!!

    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • anaiis's Profile Photo

    If you ve reached Naples, you...

    by anaiis Updated Sep 18, 2003

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    If you 've reached Naples, you probably wont miss Pompei, the ancient city, destroyed by its neighbour, volcano Vesuvio. I think its last noteworthy eruption was in early 50-ies of the former century so it is safe for you (probably) to go and pay your respect to the (still smoking some sulphur) volcano. Many tourist buses come and you can admire tourist princesses climbing up in totally totally unapropriate high heels being on the edge of seriously damaging not only their shoes but also break their legs. Small rocks are crumbling down as you walk. Very unique. I am terribly afraid of height, so I didnt have the courrage looking inside Vesuvio. But my boyfriend told me, what is lying on the bottom: old tyres. So that information can spare you from looking into it, if you are afraid as me.

    Pompei:
    Most of the city is still lying under tons of volcano ash. The last second of its citizens were probably full of coughing - if they even had time to do this. But there is plenty uncovered for you to explore. You will probably be fascintated by everything you see there. The houses are left empty though. There are some paintings to see (even the erotic ones). Pieces of things that were found in the houses are in museums (like National museum in Napoli). You well see some burnt, 'frozen in time' people. As for my experience in unbearably hot August I must tell you the first thing I saw there lying on ancient plazza was a death of a modern overweight turist (probably heart attack). I was so confused by this I just wondered off and didnt visit nearby museum. So - remember to take a lot of fluids with you, wear a hat or umbrella or dont go there in the peak summer, if you have problems with your heart.
    But the city is worth of your attention: you can observe beautiful spas, renovated gardens, pavements and streets of stone, liquor selling shops, long and straight avenues ... You can have lunch in the centre of the Pompei. You can choose between ordering (very expensive) or self servise lunch (bearable).

    Directions: Visiting vulcano Vesuvio wont take a whole day, but I suggest you visit Pompei, which is under Vesuvio, some other day (read more info about why).

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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  • Pompei and naughty boys

    by maybetara Written Jun 18, 2003

    I'd heard that Pompei is very beautiful and eerie at night, but I visited it in the day nonetheless. I saw, on display, a few plaster-filled lava-encrusted bodies of Pompeians killed by Mount V, that served as a wildly irrelevant example, by a Napolitan mother standing next to us, of punishment for naughty little boys. "You biricchino!! (which I think roughly translates into 'you naughty little devil!')That's what will happen to you if you are naughty again!" - she apparently told her bug-eyed kid, as was translated to me..

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    Pompeii

    by cheekymarieh Written Sep 7, 2002

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    The 20,000 citizens of Pompeii were killed by the volcanic eruption of Vesuvius on the 24th August 79AD. For three days the eruption continued and when it stopped the city was covered in 7 metres of ash. It remained concealed until 1594. The major excavation work however did not commence until 1748 and continued for 150 years.

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  • Andrew_Mc's Profile Photo

    Visiting Pompeii - About 10...

    by Andrew_Mc Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Visiting Pompeii - About 10 feet (3 m) of tephra fell on Pompeii, burying everything except the roofs of some buildings. The city was abandoned and its location forgotten. In 1595, excavations discovered artifacts at Pompeii and centuries of pillaging followed. Archeological excavations began in the mid-nineteenth century. Now, much of Pompeii has been excavated and it has revealed much about how people lived during that time (and died during the eruption). There are numerous molds of people in their final moments.

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  • anne_h's Profile Photo

    Pompeii

    by anne_h Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Living in Rome, I've seen my fair share of ruins, so I was tempted to give Pompeii a pass. But luckily I didn't. If you get tired of looking at frescoes and mosaics, you can always sit in one of the gardens and soak up the sun, listen to the birds sing, and smell the flowers. It's surprisingly peaceful, given that it's not that far from Naples, about 40 minutes on the Circumvesuviana train. I recommend getting an audio guide (or if you're in a group, hiring one of the guides hanging around the entrance) so you know what you're looking at. Highlights: the House of the Faun, the House of the Vetti (though this was closed for restoration when I was there), House of the Tragic Poet, and the Villa Misteri.

    Pompeii with Vesuvius in the background

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  • visit Pompei, stay there for...

    by Schocolade Written Aug 25, 2002

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    visit Pompei, stay there for one day, do not forget the museum, you must take a train in fron of the gate, to another site, the detail are all in the information paper which you can get from the gate. and you have no right to just buy the ticket for the ruins, must also buy all the tickets for all the sites there, if you have not enough time, that is quite unfair to you, like us, we did too. but do go to Vesovio. see crater.

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  • PartyRambo's Profile Photo

    Visit Pompeii and/or...

    by PartyRambo Written Aug 24, 2002

    Visit Pompeii and/or Herculaneum.

    (See my travelogue for more details to follow).

    HISTORY:

    The better-known of the cities sitting under Mount Vesuvius when it blew its lid in 79 AD, Pompeii had been a major cultural and business centre in the area for several centuries.
    Under Roman rule since 200 BC, Pompeii was a seaside resort town for the patrician class as well as an export centre for wine and fish products (particularly a locally made fish sauce).
    In 63 AD, a sever earthquake ravaged the area, and it was still rebuilding when Vesuvius erupted 16 years later, bathing the whole city in ash and mud.
    It had been spouting for several days when the final toll came, so out of a population of 20,000 only about 2000 people were caught still in town, perhaps too stubborn to get out of town. Toxic fumes disabled most of the people left around, and ash & pumice rained down to bury them 'in place', leaving one of the best-preserved examples of ancient life. Because of this, historians have learned more about ancient Roman daily life than from any other site.
    From the taverns and restaurants to the graffitti on the walls, life in Pompeii stayed undisturbed for 1500 years.
    When the site was re-discovered in 1600, it wasn't until 1748 that excavations began, and although virtually complete, you may still stumble upon an archaeologist or two doing some fine-tuning in some spots. During my visit, some were uncovering what looked to me like a sewer

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