Human Remains, Pompeii

32 Reviews

Via Villa dei Misteri, 2, Pompei, Naples, Italy
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  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Plastered Human Remains at Forum Granary

    by machomikemd Written May 5, 2016

    beside the various artifacts unearthed around Pompeii that are displayed at the restored Forum Granary, you would also see the plastered remains of the humans and animals that perished in the famous Vesuvius eruption of 79 AD.

    at the northwestern end of the Pompeii forum is a large restored building which was the site of the former Forum Granary, which was once used to store grain for sale but today it houses and stores various artifacts taken from Pompeii such as amphorae, architectural elements, plaster casts of victims. jars, vases, plates and even the plastered remains of the victims of the Mount Vesuvius Eruption of 79 AD.

    Opening times
    1st April – 31st October: daily from 8.30 am to 7.30 pm (admission closes at 6 pm)
    Closing day: 1st May
    1st November – 31st March: daily from 8.30 am to 5 pm (admission closes at 3.30 pm)
    Closing days: 25 December and 1st January

    admission price is 11 Euros per person or 20 Euros which includes 5 sites (Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplontis, Stabiae, Boscoreale) – valid for 3 consecutive days

    Address: Via Villa dei Misteri, 2, Pompei, Naples, Italy

    Directions: Several locations throughout Pompeii

    Phone: +39 0818575347

    Website: http://www.rome.net/pompeii

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    Human Remains at Casa Dei Ceii

    by machomikemd Written May 4, 2016

    you would see many human bones, skulls and even mummified remains all over the ruins of Pompeii and one of the areas is along Casa Dei Ceii along Viccole Dei Menandro.

    the Casa Dei Ceii, located along the intersection of Vicolo Del Menandro and Vicolo Del Citarista. The Villa is owned by a certain Lucius Ceius Secundus. the villa has a simple layout of which the entrance leads to the atrium, from the atrium the other rooms open out. at the back, a corridor between the triclinium and tablinum leads to the yard. A staircase with a wall in opus craticium leads to the upper floor which was not completed due the eruption. Inside the Villa are mosaic floors have geometric shapes inserted between multi-colored marble tiles. The back wall of the garden is decorated with a hunting scene and Egyptian landscapes along the side walls

    Opening times
    1st April – 31st October: daily from 8.30 am to 7.30 pm (admission closes at 6 pm)
    Closing day: 1st May
    1st November – 31st March: daily from 8.30 am to 5 pm (admission closes at 3.30 pm)
    Closing days: 25 December and 1st January

    admission price is 11 Euros per person or 20 Euros which includes 5 sites (Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplontis, Stabiae, Boscoreale) – valid for 3 consecutive days

    Address: Vicolo Del Menandro. 80045 Pompei NA, Italy

    Directions: Several locations throughout Pompeii

    Phone: +39 0818575347

    Website: http://www.pompeiisites.org/Sezione.jsp?idSezione=1409

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    • National/State Park
    • Archeology

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    The bodies

    by solopes Updated Oct 2, 2014

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    One of the most impressive sights were the petrified bodies in exhibiting. Reading the guide, Horacio claimed that they were original.

    It would be too much violent so I told him they were scaled reproductions. He didn't insist and I relaxed. But not very sure.

    True or imitation, the figures hit the goal - to remember the human dimension of the drama.

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  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Petrified mummies back

    by shavy Written Sep 23, 2014

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    A Roman city that was destroyed by an eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. Located half an hour train from Naples. Pompeii is one of the most popular tourist attractions of Italy. Within a few hours the city was (just as the towns of Herculaneum and Stabiae) gauge buried under thick layers of ash. In 1599 the city was rediscovered. It took about 150 years before Pompeii was excavated.

    Some residents were recovered as petrified mummies. Incidentally, in Pompeii, you see only a few of those famous petrified mummies back. Most mummies are used for research or be seen in foreign exhibitions. A lightning visit to Pompeii takes at least 1 hour. Others pull it out one day. Pompeii is in fact enormous. In what is now ruins are, once lived 20,000. It is very impressive to walk around. Hire a guide in particular, because that someone always points you to separate things that you do not stand out and tells wonderful stories in everything you see.

    Address: Via Villa dei Misteri 2

    Directions: Opening hours: 09.00-17.00
    Admission: € 10.00

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    Plaster casts of bodies of victims of the eruption

    by FruitLover Updated May 28, 2011

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    In the three terrible days of August 79 AD, when Vesuvius underwent the most destructive period of its activity - three major coastal communities in Campania, namely, Herculaneum, Pompeii and Stabia WERE WIPED OUT, each in different ways derived from their different locations with respect to the volcano.

    Pompeii was covered by a layer "only" 6 meters deep consisting of ash and cinder, considerably less difficult to remove.

    Situated on the western slopes of Vesuvius, Herculaneum was hit by a flow of boiling mud, perceded by burning cloud at a temperature of about 400 Celsius degrees. As the mud solidified, over the centuries it formed a tuffaceous mass between 16 to 25 meters thick, creating a situation completely different from that of Pompeii.

    The town of Stabia, unlike the other two, was completely destroyed by Silla during the occupation 10 years later, and rebuilt only partially

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    Storage facilities

    by eksvist Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Plaster casts...
    Suffocated by volcanic gasses and covered in ash and debris, their bodies eventually decayed inside the hardening matter. This air space essentially formed a mold, since the ash that had surrounded the person retained an imprint of the body. Excavators realized this and filled the air pockets with plaster. The resulting "plaster mummies" poignantly capture the human tragedy of Pompeii.

    Address: via Villa dei Misteri, 2 80045 Pompei (NA) Italy

    Phone: +39 081 8575111

    the man is praying? Storage facilities another plaster mummies another plaster mummies the dog at storage facilities

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    Dug up

    by painterdave Updated Jan 11, 2011

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    In the area on the west side of Pompeii, near the cafeteria is an area where they have laced stacks of jars, vases and other implements from the time of Pompeii. There are several plaster replicas of people who died and were covered by the ash. When Pompeii was rediscovered they found holes in the ash where people had died and their bodies were decayed. The scientists would blow plaster into the holes and let it dry overnight. Then they would removed the ash around the holes to discover these "human" statues.
    If you look closely you can see the fabric lines on his stockings, and on some of them you can see belts and jewelry.
    There is a dog statue which has an interesting dog collar.

    Directions: West of the cafeteria.
    The guy below ate in there just yesterday.

    Not Feeling A Thing Scenes of Pompeii
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    Victims of Vesuvius

    by windoweb Updated Nov 9, 2010

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    In 79AD, Vesuvius erupted, destroying the cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii.

    The pyroclastic blast from the eruption incinerated the inhabitants of Herculaneum. In Pompeii, although the 2000 inhabitants who did not escape the city were killed, the eruption preserved as well as destroyed.

    The ash cases contained skeletons and were kept intact. It is possible to pour plaster into the hollow, which then sets about the skeleton to reveal an exact cast of the body at the moment of death.

    Our guide Giuseppe
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    Victims

    by roamer61 Written May 4, 2009

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    The ash that buried Pompeii also doomed the human inhabitants. The ash and burning cinders adhered to all life, encapsulating them for all time. Over the millennium, their internal organs and soft tissue had long vanished, leaving only the outlines and bones of their bodies.
    In 1863, a process was developed and used to create casts of the remains, after removing the outer layer of pumice. What you have are the perfectly preserved remnants of the inhabitants of this once theiving city. You can even see their horror and agony in their death throes.

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    Orto dei Fuggiaschi

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Apr 25, 2009

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    The Orto dei Fuggiaschi (in English, Garden of the Fugitive) is a big garden cultivated as a vineyard. Here you can see the plaster casts of some of the victims of the eruption of Vesuvius while they were seeking an escape.

    Address: Via di Fuggiaschi, Regio I

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Human Remains in Pompeii

    by mallyak Written Aug 25, 2008

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    Hundreds of casts of human and animal bodies survive in Pompeii. The way they were preserved is unique and gives an insight into the life and death of the city.
    Although the flesh decayed the skeletons of the victims remained trapped within the preserving layer of volcanic debris. This sarcophagus of ash also maintained an imprint of each body as it was at the time of death.

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    The Bodies of Pompeii

    by wilocrek Written Mar 15, 2008

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    This sobering scene of bodies frozen in time and ash is both a reminder of those catastrophic events of 79 AD and at the same time inspires wonder at the preservation of the bodies. This is located by the entrance to Pompeii nearest to the Colisseum.

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    Oooppps...wrong catergory!

    by wilocrek Written Jan 11, 2008

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    Inappropriate humor aside, one can view several different bodies that have been preserved in ash in Pompeii. They are located in a covered area behind a fence by the forum. This is where they have stored many other artifacts as well.

    I wonder if they found this body in the brothel?

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    The plaster Casts or People

    by Balam Updated Oct 23, 2007

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    In 1748, Pompeii was rediscovered--not only its houses, but (eventually) some of its citizens. Although only fragmentary skeletal remains were found there, hollow spaces within the hardened volcanic debris revealed the forms of many deceased Romans. Suffocated by volcanic gasses and covered in ash and debris, their bodies eventually decayed inside the hardening matter. This air space essentially formed a mould, since the ash that had surrounded the person retained an imprint of the body. Excavator and Archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli, who had taken charge of the excavations in 1860, realized this and injected the cavities with plaster, which set. He then chipped away the ash which had set like stone from around the plaster casts. The resulting "plaster mummies" poignantly capture the human tragedy of Pompeii.

    All the casts in Pompeii are the original ones, they can be seen nowhere else.

    Directions: There are several visible in the large warehouse on the western edge of the forum, including possibly the most famous one (picture 4). There are also several in the Building of Eumachia and the villa of mysteries.

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    Frozen in time

    by BorneoGrrl Written Jun 11, 2007

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    At first sight, these bodies covered & hardened by ash, mud & debris looked creepy but as I looked upon them, I felt sad because they couldn't escape the volcanic eruptions of Vesuvius and died where they stood from the heavy clouds of ash or stones. Many of the bodies discovered were found where they died, encased in a grey cast and preserved in death

    A Pompeii native
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