Civitavecchia Things to Do

  • Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
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  • Teatro, Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    Teatro, Corso Centocelle, Civitavecchia
    by maykal
  • Civitavecchia beach
    Civitavecchia beach
    by maykal

Most Recent Things to Do in Civitavecchia

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    No more "Sailor & Nurse" sculpture

    by globetrott Updated Oct 28, 2015

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    When I was in Civitavecchia in 2012 there was a giant sculpture of the "Sailor & Nurse" scene, that was taken out of a photo made at the end of WW II and had been published in the LIFE-magazine, see an article about it, when you click on the link below!
    When I was there again in 2015 the sculpture was gone and I have no idea why.

    Directions: it was close to the castello and directely on the beach-boulevard.

    Website: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/vet-who-says-he-was-kissing-sailor-famous-photo-dies-n52876

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    • Photography
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    Viale Giuseppe Garibaldi

    by globetrott Written Aug 23, 2015

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    Viale Giuseppe Garibaldi is the name of the direct street that you can take from the Port-gate and Forte Michelangelo in order to walk to the train-station. You will find a church along that street, various cafes and restaurants, some nice architecture as well and the street is paved with stones that are a bit better than the old cobbled stones would be, so this is almost quite a good path for a rolling suitecase, even though there is no asphalt.
    In my last picture: the trainstation of Civitavecchia.

    Directions: Viale Garibaldi runs from the portgate and Forte Michelangelo to the trainstation.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    The Ocean-Boulevard

    by globetrott Written Aug 23, 2015

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    There is a great Ocean-Boulevard between the Forte Michelangelo and the train-station and to walk that distance it will take about 20 minutes. In 2011 I saw there the giant sculpture of the "Sailor kissing a Nurse", but that was not there anymore in August 2015. You will find lots of benches and some shady palmtrees along the Ocean-Boulevard, some kiosks and cafes and lots of other places to relax. There is a beach as well, mostly with gravel instead of fine sand.b.t.w. that sculpture in my last photo is for Luigi Calamatta, he was an Italian painter and engraver. He was born in Civitavecchia in 1801.

    Directions: The Ocean-Boulevard starts at Forte Michelangelo and ends at the trainstation.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Forte Michelangelo / Michelangelo castle

    by globetrott Written Aug 23, 2015

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    The city of Civitavecchia was part of the Papal States from 1432 till 1870 and Pope Julius II (1443 - 1513) gave the order to build Forte Michelangelo as a part of the medieval townwall, but the castle was built as a seperate building anyway and a last place to find shelter. The first architect of the castle was Donato Bramante who died in 1514, then
    Giuliano Leno, Antonio da Sangallo and finally Michelangelo finished the castle as a fortification and in order to defend the port.
    Nowadays Forte Michelangelo still looks as in the 15th century and as far as I remember it is not open to visitors.

    Directions: Forte Michelangelo is at the port-gate. All cruise-passengers whose ships are docked on the long pier will be unloaded by the port-shuttle-buses right in front of the castle.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Teatro Comunale Traiano / The Municipal Theatre

    by globetrott Written Aug 23, 2015

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    Teatro Comunale Traiano, the Municipal Theatre of Civitavecchia is one of the few buildings in town that might be interesting to take a closer look at for some interesting architecture. The theatre has a great facade in Neoclassical style and it was built in the year 1844. Civitavecchia is a settlement for much more than 2000 years and has about 72.000 inhabitants nowadays.

    Directions: You will find it in Corso Centocelle, from the port-gate you have to walk maybe 10 minutes to get to the Municipal Theatre.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Festivals
    • Architecture

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    Chiesa Dell'Immacolata

    by globetrott Written Aug 23, 2015

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    La Chiesa Dell'Immacolata / the church of the virgin was built in 1856 on the place, where a small church of the 16th century served by the Franciscans used to stand. Inside the church you will find the grave of Alessandro Cialdi, who was the last captain of the Papal fleet

    Directions: You will pass by the Chiesa Dell'Immacolata, when you walk from the port-gate to the train-station.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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    The lighttower

    by globetrott Updated Aug 23, 2015

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    The first lighttower of Civitavecchia dated back to the year 108 AD, built by the Roman Emperor Trajan. Civitavecchia was called Centumcellae at that time. The lighttower in the port of Civitavecchia certainly was built much later, but it looked interesting and most of the cruisepassengers will pass by it on the way from the cruiseship to town.
    And it is interesting to see how small such an old lighttower is nowadays against a giant ship like the MSC Sinfonia, the ship that has taken me from Capertown to Genua in 2012.

    Directions: This lighttower is standing on the long seaside-pier !

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    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    remains of the medieval townwall

    by globetrott Written Aug 23, 2015

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    In many places, especially close to the cruiseport you will still find some great remains of the medieval townwalls that were once built while Civitavecchia was a part of the Papal States. In some place you will be able to walk on top of these walls and be able to watch the scenery from above just like the old soldiers did, even though the besiegers of today will be thousands of cruise-passangers every day heading into Civitavecchia or to Rome.
    There will be days in the high season when 5-8 giant ships will be in port at the same time with a total capacity of 15.000 passengers and even more. Hopefully the majority of them will take the (mostly quite expensive) excursions organized by the ships, but just imagine all of them would decide to take the train to Rome on their own.....

    Directions: They are mostly close to the port-area !

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Photography

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    Wanna spend the day in town ?

    by globetrott Written Aug 16, 2015

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    Some years ago I spent the day in the town of Civitavecchia instead of heading to Rome with all of the others. No good idea, the town is quite boring, no special shops, no special restaurants, beaches or sights. After some time in town I went back to the ship and spent the rest of the day there .

    Directions: Civitavecchia is about 70km west of Rome.

    Related to:
    • Cruise
    • Architecture

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    THE MUNICIPAL THEATRE

    by balhannah Updated Sep 5, 2012

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    The Municipal Theatre was designed by the 'architect Antonio De Rossi was named in honor of the emperor Trajan Trajan Theatre founder of the city.
    I thought this was quite interesting, in that the original shape of this building was a horsehoe, and the curtain was made up of an oil painting depicting a sacrifice to Neptune Emperor Trajan

    It was in 1844, the Theatre opened with the premiere of Donizetti's opera "Eustogia by Romano."
    Unfortunately, it was destroyed in the war, and a new theater was rebuilt and reopened in 1948.
    The theater has a neoclassical facade on the outside, and inside, it has 638 seats.

    Address: Course Centocelle, 1

    Website: http://www.civitavecchia.com/spettacolo-teatro_comunale.html

    Municpal theatre
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    • Theater Travel

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    ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHEDRAL

    by balhannah Updated Sep 5, 2012

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    Where the Cathedral stands today, once stood a smaller Church. The City and population outgrew this Church, and a new one was built, which was the Cathedral I was viewing today. It was a simple Church until 1805, when the Church of San Francesco became the Cathedral of the Diocese of Civitavecchia.
    If you look up to nearer the top of the Cathedral, you will seed two large statues of S. Francis of Assisi and St. Anthony of Padua. The Bell's are of historic interest too, as they were made with metal with two cannons donated specifically by the Pope.

    The entry to the front door is by many steps.

    Directions: The Cathedral is located on the main square of Civitavecchia, just before taking Corso Marconi in the direction of Tarquinia.

    Website: http://www.civitavecchia.com/luoghi-chiese.html

    The Cathedral
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    • Religious Travel
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    FORT MICHELANELGO

    by balhannah Written Sep 5, 2012

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    The Fort, you will see from the Cruise Ship, and will be the first major sight when being dropped off by the shuttle bus at the end of the Pier. When standing beside these walls, I realized just how massive they were, and even though I couldn't measure the thickness, I read they are 6 metres thick, wow!

    It was the Pope in the year 1503, who decided a city a fortress was needed to defend the town as well as the port. The fort was completed in 1535 under the pontificate of another great Pope, Pope Paul III Farnese, the great patron of the arts.

    The fort is the shape of a quadrangle, and has four bastions which are named, Saint Columba, Santa Stop, San Sebastian, San Giovanni. In the tower of San Sebastian is an underground corridor, used as a secret exit from the fortress to the ground, and in Santa Stop, once in direct contact with the sea, is a small chapel in honor of the saint, patron of the city.
    The walls have a balustrade with an openings where muskets or cannons were fired. Once, there was a Moat, this no longer exists
    The fort could be completely isolated from the rest of the fortress in order to be able to concentrate the last defense. The old entrance still has the bronze pulley that was used to lower and raise the bridge.

    There is an admission fee

    Address: Port of Civitavecchia

    Website: http://www.civitavecchia.com/home.html

    Fort Michelangelo Fort Michelangelo Fort Michelangelo Fort Michelangelo Fort Michelangelo
    Related to:
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    • Castles and Palaces
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    Civitavecchia visit

    by balramdass Written Aug 20, 2012

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    Just came back from Civitavecchia from a cruise visit. C is much changed since we were last there about 8 years ago, then we just went to Rome and just spent about an hour in C but this time we didnt go to Rome and stayed in C.

    It is now a more like a asmall seeside town with a lot of shops , market, restaurants and bars.
    You can change money here too at a reasonable rate. The market was good, managed to get a few things with some bartering. Had 2 beers in the open outdoor bar, another paint at the bar by the seaside, a bit expensive though for 5 euros. There is a lovely statue of a sailor and a girl by the seaside.

    Next time I go on another cruise and we stop at C i will be more than happy to spend 3-4 hours here.
    Hope this helped, Bal

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  • Ancient Baths - Terme Taurine

    by MTZsgirl Written Oct 15, 2009

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    Terme Taurine
    Located in Civitavecchia you'll find the Archaeological-Botanical Park of the Taurine Baths. These baths were built around naturally hot sulfur (sulphur) spring water. The site has two parts: The Republican Baths which date back to the 1st century B.C. and The Imperial Baths built by Emperor Hadrian between 123-136 A.D. For approx. 5 euros you can walk around on your own however for only approx. 8 euros you can have a guided tour (English available). The guided tour is much more informative as you will learn about the building techniques, what archaeologists believe each space was used for, and much more. Recently the site has added a formal Roman style garden called Horti Traianei (Gardens of Emperor Trajan), which includes many of the plants that the Romans would have recognized.

    The guided tour takes about 1.5-2 hours and makes for a leisurely afternoon if you are looking for a short trip. The Baths are closed on Mondays. Current hours for the summer are Tues.-Sun. 9:00am-1:00pm and again 2:30pm-dusk. Winter hours are Tues.-Sun. 9:00am-1:00pm and again 3:00pm-dusk.

    For more information visit the website: www.prolococivitavecchia.it, send an email to prolococivitavecchia@inwind.it, or call (from in Italy) 338-2707567.

    Address: via Terme Taurine

    Directions: Car: highway A12 - exit for Civitavecchia Nord/Tolfa. Bus: Cotral o Tolfa leaving Piazza V. Emanuele (in front of Cathedral). Pro Loco Shuttle: every morning from Fort Michelangelo starting at 9:00am. See Visitors Info inside the harbor Or call a Taxi.

    Phone: (from in Italy) 338-2707567

    Website: http://www.prolococivitavecchia.it

    A view of the ruins at Terme Taurine
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Trains
    • Cruise

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    The walls and Forte Michelangelo

    by maykal Updated Jan 16, 2009

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    You can walk along the top of the walls...not as exciting as it sounds, as it is more like walking along a wide pavement, but you do get good views over the busy harbour and Forte Michelangelo, a 15th century fortress museum at the entrance to the port. Can't tell you more about the fort...if Civitavecchia merits a mention in any tourist guide, it is usually the fort that is mentioned and nothing else, but it was a hot day and I was in no mood for museums. And anyway, it was shut.

    Old walls and Fort Michelangelo, Civitavecchia

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