Ostia Antica Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by leics
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by leics
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by leics

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Ostia Antica

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    Hidden treasures.

    by leics Updated Mar 20, 2016

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    Ostia is so vast that it simply wouldn't be possible to remove all the artefacts discovered during excavations off the site and into the safety of museums, especially if those artefacts are badly damaged when excavated.

    So do explore off the main streets and go into houses, gardens and courtyards. You may well be surprised at what you find, still in its original place.

    The decorative brickwork is on one of the tombs which line the road which now serves as the main entrance into ancient Ostia. It dates from before 100AD/CE.

    The beautifully-carved but broken coffin was also tucked away in the necropolis (tombs) which lines the main entrance.

    The niche with the broken statue is in the courtyard-garden of one of the smaller private houses on a side-street.

    The granite flour-grinders are in the courtyard of one of the several Ostia bakeries.

    The large female sculpture is set in what must have been a lovely garden-courtyard of one of the larger private houses.

    Hidden treasure.
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Central heating.

    by leics Updated Mar 20, 2016

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    Explore some of the houses and you may see the remains of their central heating system of underfloor heating and box tiles to carry warm air through the walls.

    The Romans were pretty good at this sort of system and, even in Italy, winter evenings can be chilly. Of course, this sort of central heating was of even more value in the chillier parts of the Roman empire, such as the UK!

    The hypocaust system is simple enough but very effective: floors were set on top of piles of tiles or bricks, with the gap large enough for a small servant (or a child servant) to crawl in and clear out soot etc when required. The under-floor areas were linked to a large oven or ovens, where fires were set and fuelled with wood (more servants and servant-time required). The warm air (and no doubt smoke) passed through the underfloor areas and also rose up through the rectangular tiles set into every wall and covered with plaster, warming the rooms from the sides as well as from below.

    Of course, only the wealthier citizens could afford this sort of heating in their homes and premises. Ordinary folk had to make do with a brazier or two: efficient enough but dangerous both in terms of fire and in terms of fumes.

    Box tiles.
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    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Terme del Foro

    by sinoda Written Jan 6, 2005

    You can go beneath the baths into the small and winding dungeons, where the heating system and water retention has been. It's not really spooky, but not really canny either.

    but remember: don't go towards the light! =)

    terme del Foro; Ostia Antica
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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Adventure Travel

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    Please don't use these

    by sinoda Written Jan 6, 2005

    This has been a public toilet facility (latrine).
    People were sitting close to each other on maybe marble desks with holes in them. Beneath there must have been water running to dispose the droppings...

    this seems very eloborate.

    latrines; Ostia Antica
    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Archeology
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    Residence outside Ostia Antic Piazza

    by icunme Written Mar 16, 2006

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    If you venture to Ostia Antica to see the ruins - you could park up toward the town Piazza and see the local people and their homes. It is just a short walk to the ruins.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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Ostia Antica Off The Beaten Path

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